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Should I sell my vinyl rig?

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Jas0_0

Jas0_0

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My partner (who’s away and unaware that I’m considering selling my turntable) just sent me - completely unprompted - a pic of us buying records while on holiday in Berlin.

Reminded me that records offer experiences that go beyond just sitting at home listening to perfectly reproduced music.

Think that just tipped me into keeping the turntable. The kitchen can wait another couple of months!

Thanks for everyone’s input - has been enlightening.
 
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N9R

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I had an amazing experience with a techno 12” single last night, could not believe the scale, imaging and weightiness.

One good reason for this; in Techno and related dance scenes, particularly for small labels, the vinyl cut is often the only time where experienced, professional mastering engineers get involved, indeed you can't really get vinyl made without this happening! The digital versions released are, in many cases, the mixdown direct from the artist's studio - if they sound "good enough" they're distributed as-is. Plus, digital is often an after-thought for vinyl-centric scenes and labels.. which is why you'll find in many instances (and I have numerous examples) the vinyl release is objectively superior - minus all the noise and distortions inherent to the format, of course
 

MattHooper

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One good reason for this; in Techno and related dance scenes, particularly for small labels, the vinyl cut is often the only time where experienced, professional mastering engineers get involved, indeed you can't really get vinyl made without this happening! The digital versions released are, in many cases, the mixdown direct from the artist's studio - if they sound "good enough" they're distributed as-is. Plus, digital is often an after-thought for vinyl-centric scenes and labels.. which is why you'll find in many instances (and I have numerous examples) the vinyl release is objectively superior - minus all the noise and distortions inherent to the format, of course

I've been tracking down vinyl copies of some of my favorite 90's techno/electronica and so far every LP has sounded stunning.
 

escksu

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This is my personal opinion.

I would say just keep them. From time to time, you would want to listen to them, esp. for that nostalgic feeling of LP. IMHO, LPs have their own character and I would say magic. Something which digital simply doesnt have. Furthermore, 2000 pounds isn't alot of money compared what you stand to lose. Although its easy to buy a new LP player next time, the same cannot be said for the vinyl records themselves.
 

FeddyLost

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Sometimes I feel that I need something "physical". So, I just stayed with CDs that I own.
They are also need "ritual" but more durable and compact. With DA frontend you can just buy good CD transport and CDs.
 

Zim

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Make digital vinyl rips of your collection and sell them off after. I'd imagine having newborns would severely diminish the amount of time you'd have to just sit and listen to vinyls. Why prioritise the physical aspect of it when the main goal is to listen to music?

Also, a (technical) benefit of making vinyl rips would be that you'd (usually) have a higher quality audio file versus what would be available on streams and general digital formats. A lot of modern digital versions of recordings are plagued by digital clipping and distortion (look up Loudness War).

I use the following website to see if a particular album by an artist I listen to is affected by clipping with the digital version of their album;
https://dr.loudness-war.info/
 

escksu

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Make digital vinyl rips of your collection and sell them off after. I'd imagine having newborns would severely diminish the amount of time you'd have to just sit and listen to vinyls. Why prioritise the physical aspect of it when the main goal is to listen to music?

Also, a (technical) benefit of making vinyl rips would be that you'd (usually) have a higher quality audio file versus what would be available on streams and general digital formats. A lot of modern digital versions of recordings are plagued by digital clipping and distortion (look up Loudness War).

I use the following website to see if a particular album by an artist I listen to is affected by clipping with the digital version of their album;
https://dr.loudness-war.info/

The experience of listening to vinyl is not the same as listen to digital rips.
 

Soniclife

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The experience of listening to vinyl is not the same as listen to digital rips.
Experience is different, but the sound is the same. Some people want that difference, I probably do, some don't.
 

levimax

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Make digital vinyl rips of your collection and sell them off after. I'd imagine having newborns would severely diminish the amount of time you'd have to just sit and listen to vinyls. Why prioritise the physical aspect of it when the main goal is to listen to music?

Also, a (technical) benefit of making vinyl rips would be that you'd (usually) have a higher quality audio file versus what would be available on streams and general digital formats. A lot of modern digital versions of recordings are plagued by digital clipping and distortion (look up Loudness War).

I use the following website to see if a particular album by an artist I listen to is affected by clipping with the digital version of their album;
https://dr.loudness-war.info/
The problem with rips of vinyl is that you are forever listening to the cart and TT/ set up you had at the time. Part of the fun of vinyl is getting a new cart and listening to all your favorite records again with a different sound / perspective.
 
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Robin L

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The problem with rips of vinyl is that you are forever listening to the cart and TT/ set up you had at the time. Part of the fun of vinyl is getting a new cart and listening to all your favorite records again with a different sound / perspective.
Translation: every turntable/cartridge/phono preamp will screw up the sound in a different way. Solution: listen to the digital file that was the master tape, before it was sonically compromised to cope with the inherent limitations of LP manufacture and reproduction.
 

levimax

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Translation: every turntable/cartridge/phono preamp will screw up the sound in a different way. Solution: listen to the digital file that was the master tape, before it was sonically compromised to cope with the inherent limitations of LP manufacture and reproduction.
That is a negative way of looking at it :) .... How about due to the mechanical nature of LP playback, unlike digital playback, it is possible to recover various degrees of musical information based upon the quality and set up of the mechanical parts.

Regarding the "solution" it does not work for me. Since I have older LP's that do not have an original digital source, and were recorded and mastered with the LP as the intended playback medium, I find the sound of the original LP to at least be an interesting historical reference and in some cases it is my preferred sound compared to later digital "re-mastered" versions.

Bottom line for me is LP playback is a "luxury" like a fancy mechanical watch. I can understand why it is not for everyone but I don't understand why people try to convince others that you have to chose between one or the other. I think having the capability to play both vinyl and digital expands my opportunities to enjoy the hobby and helps add historical and artistic context to recorded music.
 

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1629744989912.png
 

escksu

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Experience is different, but the sound is the same. Some people want that difference, I probably do, some don't.

I just saw that OP has decided to keep the turntable, I don't think there is a need to discuss about this anymore.
 
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Zim

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The experience of listening to vinyl is not the same as listen to digital rips.

I care less of the experience of using an equipment as a preference compared to the convenience and ability to enjoy the music with less limitations. Much like I care less about reading a book in physical form or on a Kindle. I just want to read a good book. But that's just me.
 

escksu

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I care less of the experience of using an equipment as a preference compared to the convenience and ability to enjoy the music with less limitations. Much like I care less about reading a book in physical form or on a Kindle. I just want to read a good book. But that's just me.

I just saw that OP has decided to keep the turntable, I don't think there is a need to discuss about this anymore.
 
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escksu

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My partner (who’s away and unaware that I’m considering selling my turntable) just sent me - completely unprompted - a pic of us buying records while on holiday in Berlin.

Reminded me that records offer experiences that go beyond just sitting at home listening to perfectly reproduced music.

Think that just tipped me into keeping the turntable. The kitchen can wait another couple of months!

Thanks for everyone’s input - has been enlightening.

Cheers!! Glade you decide to keep them!! I am very sure you made the right choice!!
 

A.wayne

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This question is less technical and more... philosophical? So apologies if it offends. I'm asking here because I think ASR leans away from vinyl being a good way to listen to music, so I'm hoping I'll get from you good, rational reasons to counter my slightly misty eyed ones.

The facts:
  • I have a low spec 1980s Linn LP12 turntable with a new MC cart, which I run into a mic amp, then into an AD converter, then into a Mac mini where I do digital RIAA and room correction before sending it to a DAC and then on to speakers.
  • I've a small but growing collection of around fifty records.
  • My partner gave birth to our twins ten weeks ago.
  • Our house needs renovations.
  • If I sold the vinyl-enabling portion of my system, I'd probably get around £2000, which is a long way towards a badly-needed new kitchen.
  • I am under no pressure from my partner to sell anything.
My arguments for vinyl:
  • I love the ritual of playing records, and how my records sound.
  • Before the twins were born I loved going to second hand record shops.
  • I have found some great music this way, that I wouldn't have done otherwise.
  • I like having a slowly growing physical representation of my favourite albums, rather than them just existing as little hearts in the Tidal ether.
  • I like the thought that in years to come the twins will leaf through and find music they might never encounter on YouTube, or whatever young people use by then.
  • Records look nice.
  • My LP12 looks nice.
  • I am proud to have created a vinyl playback system that is balanced from cartridge to speaker, that enables me to room correct a turntable, that is I think totally unique (not so humblebrag, sorry).
My arguments against vinyl:
  • Records are expensive
  • Records definitely don't sound as good as the same music streamed.
  • Modern LP pressings are often really disappointing.
  • My system would be far simpler without.

What should I do?

Thanks!

James
Hello,


To keep or not is too personal , once gone your LP’s collection will be hard to duplicate, as to sound if it is less so vs Streaming you have a bad analog setup and this is where your effort should be applied , improving your system ...

BTW , The LP12 is a great player if setup correctly...!


Regards
 

David Harper

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My TT has been in an upstairs closet for a few years now. Every now and then I think about getting it out and setting it up. I sit down and wait until
the feeling goes away because I know what will happen; I'll spend an hour or two or three fooling with the rig and connecting it up again and checking the cartridge and tonearm adjustments and cleaning the vinyl and in the end I will think "what was it I thought I would accomplish by doing this?". Happens every time.
 

Balle Clorin

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Good choice.

I only got a few 100s records from my teens mostly, too many memories , so I will never selling my record player even if is is not much in use compared to streaming.
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1632550746113.png


Besides the nostalgic experience playing it is fun to tweak and measure it
1632550867157.png
 

Holmz

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you left out the main drawback; all the screwing around required for cartridge mounting, stylus and record cleaning, tone arm balancing and adjustment, and walk across the floor very softly while it's playing. It's not worth the effort. I'd gladly sell my project carbon black TT, Ortofon cartridge, and phono preamp (which I paid a total of 800 for) for two hundred if anyone wanted them. Ask me why I bought them ten years ago.
I don't have an intelligent answer. Audiophile nostalgia I guess.

If you are in SoCal, then send a PM please.
My daughter’s birthday is coming up and she wants a TT.

Mostly it is nostalgia recalling when I let her and her sister dance to a record before school if they were ready on time.
I cannot figure out why I would have bought that Paula Abdul album back then, so that will be sent to her as it was the album that they danced to.
 
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