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Review and Measurements of Crown XLS 1502 Amp

amirm

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I am glad you show temperature in degree Celsius.
Are you starting to use the metric system in the US?
No, we are stuck in lousy English system. The reason I use degree C is because electronic part ratings are always in degree C so we (electrical engineers) are used to thinking in that scale.
 

Blumlein 88

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No, we are stuck in lousy English system. The reason I use degree C is because electronic part ratings are always in degree C so we (electrical engineers) are used to thinking in that scale.
The English system could have been good. Had it stayed with doubling measures it would have been almost like digital bits.

But 2 cups equal a pint.
2 pints equal a quart.
4 quarts equal a gallon.
Well not quite what you wanted is it.

How many pecks in a bushel? 4 pecks of course.
How much is a peck? Why 2 dry gallons. (used for grain and beans and peas).

320 rods in a mile. And a rod is a convenient 16.5 feet. Not to think of yards (5.5 yards in a rod). 1760 yards in a mile.

See it is all very simple.

Acres did anyone want to talk about acres? Originally defined as one chain by one furlong. (66ft x 660ft). Or 43,560 ft squared. Very simple.

I grew up in the USA with all these odd measures. But fell in love with the metric system at age 8. However, I can do most any conversion by remembering that 2.54 cm= 1 inch exactly. The only exact metric to english conversion. And that a 1 cm cubed of water equals one gram. Those two with knowledge of the old English system lets you do all the conversions. (I'll conveniently not mention slugs though I learned them in engineering course work 32.16 and all that)

So I ask you, especially all of you from outside the USA, is the English system lousy???? IS IT????

Oh, and need I mention Imperial gallons vs US gallons. US gallons are 231 cubic inches. Or maybe imperial tons to US tons? Oh did I forget to mention tons. Well never mind.

:facepalm:;):mad::p:cool:


PS- 212 F degrees for boiling and a convenient 32 F degrees for freezing is very simple to remember when that is all you heard about. 0 degrees F is lots colder than 0 degrees C. Who is Lord Kelvin anyway?

PPS- fluid ounces actually almost make sense. I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader. :rolleyes:
 
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Pillars

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Not too bad on the performance front for this amp. I bought a busted box new XLS2502 in the $200 range quite some time ago that has been a total tank.
 

amirm

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So I ask you, especially all of you from outside the USA, is the English system lousy???? IS IT????
Yeh, try to do woodworking and divide dimensions and see how far you get. :) 1/3 of 23.25 inches is what???? I have cut so many board wrong because I took 3.75 for 3.25 stuff like that....
 

RayDunzl

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RayDunzl

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1/3 of 23.25 inches is what?
No need to be irrational there.

1/3 of 23.25 = 7 3/4 inches.

What's 1/3 of a meter?

333.333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333 nevermind
 

Frank Dernie

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The English system could have been good. Had it stayed with doubling measures it would have been almost like digital bits.

But 2 cups equal a pint.
2 pints equal a quart.
4 quarts equal a gallon.
Well not quite what you wanted is it.

How many pecks in a bushel? 4 pecks of course.
How much is a peck? Why 2 dry gallons. (used for grain and beans and peas).

320 rods in a mile. And a rod is a convenient 16.5 feet. Not to think of yards (5.5 yards in a rod). 1760 yards in a mile.

See it is all very simple.

Acres did anyone want to talk about acres? Originally defined as one chain by one furlong. (66ft x 660ft). Or 43,560 ft squared. Very simple.

I grew up in the USA with all these odd measures. But fell in love with the metric system at age 8. However, I can do most any conversion by remembering that 2.54 cm= 1 inch exactly. The only exact metric to english conversion. And that a 1 cm cubed of water equals one gram. Those two with knowledge of the old English system lets you do all the conversions. (I'll conveniently not mention slugs though I learned them in engineering course work 32.16 and all that)

So I ask you, especially all of you from outside the USA, is the English system lousy???? IS IT????

Oh, and need I mention Imperial gallons vs US gallons. US gallons are 231 cubic inches. Or maybe imperial tons to US tons? Oh did I forget to mention tons. Well never mind.

:facepalm:;):mad::p:cool:


PS- 212 F degrees for boiling and a convenient 32 F degrees for freezing is very simple to remember when that is all you heard about. 0 degrees F is lots colder than 0 degrees C. Who is Lord Kelvin anyway?

PPS- fluid ounces actually almost make sense. I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader. :rolleyes:
Being pedantic what is referred to in the USA as the English system isn’t. The Imperial system, which was used in the United Kingdom until 1968 is different from the system used in the USA in several ways, a bit like the language and spelling.
For example the “cup” is afaik a purely US measure, not used in the UK, in baking dry units were measured by weight and liquids in pints and ounces, never “cups”, for example.
The Imperial gallon is bigger than a US gallon, 20 fl oz instead of 16.
We officially went to the SI units system in 1968 but a lot of older people still use stones for their weight (nobody would give their weight in pounds) though I have used kg myself for decades.
Farmers mainly still talk acres rather than hectares, speeds are still in mph on road signs and distances in miles (or yards for short distances).
Many older people still use farenheit when checking the weather, I don’t.
The differences are minor, but the measurement system and language used in the USA are not strictly “English”
 

Frank Dernie

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I wonder if decimal time and dates would have been any practical benefit? I know France tried that after the revolution, but it never succeded.
When I worked in France I always joked that France had a decimal year.
There are so many people on holiday and May and August nothing much gets achieved...
 

andreasmaaan

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Oddly enough, in Australia where the imperial system was abandoned in around 1968 too, the only indices IME that routinely continue to be thought of in feet/inches are human height, loudspeaker transducer diameter, and ***** length.
 

Timbo2

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Being pedantic what is referred to in the USA as the English system isn’t. The Imperial system, which was used in the United Kingdom until 1968 is different from the system used in the USA in several ways, a bit like the language and spelling.
For example the “cup” is afaik a purely US measure, not used in the UK, in baking dry units were measured by weight and liquids in pints and ounces, never “cups”, for example.
The Imperial gallon is bigger than a US gallon, 20 fl oz instead of 16.
We officially went to the SI units system in 1968 but a lot of older people still use stones for their weight (nobody would give their weight in pounds) though I have used kg myself for decades.
Farmers mainly still talk acres rather than hectares, speeds are still in mph on road signs and distances in miles (or yards for short distances).
Many older people still use farenheit when checking the weather, I don’t.
The differences are minor, but the measurement system and language used in the USA are not strictly “English”
Many years ago I forced the Wall Street Journal to print a correction after they wrote an article questioning why a UK model Ford automobile got so much better gas mileage compared to the one sold in the US. I pointed out that the "gallon" figure they pulled from the Ford UK site was an Imperial gallon.
 

Sal1950

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Sal will surely tell you there's no substitute for cubic inches.
You know me so well. LOL
Yes the system is a bit wonky, but we love it. :)
Only thing I don't agree on is farenheit vs celcius
Celcius in no way to me relates to what people feel in the way of temperature change, unless you use decimals.
80f is 26c 32 is 0? Goes from warm to freezing in a big hurry.

Besides if you were a poor mechanic like me and had to buy about $5k of new tools when the geniuses ordained we had to change to metric
you weren't too happy at the time.
Plus all the old brit cars & bikes using whitworth, that made 3 set of wrenches.
 

andreasmaaan

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You know me so well. LOL
Yes the system is a bit wonky, but we love it. :)
Only thing I don't agree on is farenheit vs celcius
Celcius in no way to me relates to what people feel in the way of temperature change, unless you use decimals.
80f is 26c 32 is 0? Goes from warm to freezing in a big hurry.

Besides if you were a poor mechanic like me and had to buy about $5k of new tools when the geniuses ordained we had to change to metric
you weren't too happy at the time.
Plus all the old brit cars & bikes using whitworth, that made 3 set of wrenches.
This is a joke right? ;)

Can you feel the difference between 80 and 81 deg Fahrenheit? Are that many gradations really necessary?

1 deg Celsius is about the minimum perceptible change in ambient temp (based on nothing but my flawed and biased personal experience).
 

Sal1950

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Can you feel the difference between 80 and 81 deg Fahrenheit? Are that many gradations really necessary?
Yes I think so, Not 1 but 2 degrees, in the water, you bet.
We have a on-going contest at the swimming pool here and I can consistently call the water temp within 2 degrees after a few minutes to acclimate.
 

RayDunzl

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Getting back somewhere that might be closer to the topic, which "measurement system/s" is/are in use when we measure the performance of our audio appliances?
 

amirm

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Getting back somewhere that might be closer to the topic, which "measurement system/s" is/are in use when we measure the performance of our audio appliances?
SI system.
 

RayDunzl

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