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Research on reflections

dasdoing

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btw. you could also avoid the unwated reflection by fireing into the wall like this:


View attachment 165064

today we have DSP so the FR could be made as good (if not better) as with direct sound+reflections.

on a side-note: this would make the stage even wider as standard reflective triangle, since the phantom source will be the direction of the reflection only. in the standard it will be somewhere in the middle of the reflection and the speaker
 

Chromatischism

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btw. you could also avoid the unwated reflection by fireing into the wall like this:


View attachment 165064

today we have DSP so the FR could be made as good (if not better) as with direct sound+reflections.
If I did this with my speakers, they would sound terrible and the imaging would be shot to hell. No thanks.

Can you really use EQ to fix what was lost doing this? I'm not so sure.
 

Da cynics

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I don't understand, but it looks interesting

 
OP
A

aarons915

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I mentioned I would add comments when I moved to a larger space so pasting what I added to the OP:

Small Room vs Big Room:

I mentioned that I was previously in a small room (11' wide with 8ft ceilings and about a 10' listening distance) and just moved to a concrete loft that is a similar listening distance but is 15' wide with 12' ceilings. It is somewhat surprising but it didn't make the speakers sound smaller, if anything they are more spacious and the room sounds like a concert hall. I have almost no absorption in this room at the moment, just a few love seats so that may be a factor. I also feel like the sound is more clear, I speculate that I'm hearing the direct sound clearly with the early reflections that are now arriving a bit later due to the longer distances from the walls and ceiling and then the later arriving reflections are much lower in level so the overall sound remains clear.
 

bo_knows

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I would think accurately reproducing what is on the media vs "assuming of course that your goal is to get closer to a live acoustic performance in your room" are in my mind two different goals. One needs to define the goal in order to attempt to achieve it. That being said, IMHO, without some kind of standard this is not achievable.
What I'm trying to say, if the goal is to hear what the mastering engineer has heard in the studio, we will have to recreate the same environment in our homes (is stereo reproduction adequate enough to capture the live sound is a different topic). Most of the music being sold/offered today is still in stereo. So, if there's a template for example that shows, mastering studio dimensions are x,y,z, following room treatments were used and placed here, and the mastering engineer was sitting this far from the monitors. He or she was using Kii Audio three speakers (used them just as an example, which I assume need fewer room treatments and it could reduce the size and cost of the mastering studio). Now, if we can build our listening room using a template like this, we have a good chance to hear what the mastering engineer heard. In this case, to achieve this goal, I see things in black and white. In my mind, this would be the scientistic way of approaching this goal since it will be repeatable over and over again. Anyway, sorry for the rant but this is how I feel about what the mastering engineer intended for us to hear but in our homes. I do understand that with good monitors and good room, one can accurately reproduce what is on the media but it may not be the same sound that the mastering engineer heard hence the need for the "template".

This is the ultimate audiophile goal? Right? To hear what mastering engineer intended, no more no less.
Utopian view, huh. :)
I understand this is a marketing video but supports my take on the issue.

 

Jack B

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I understand this is a marketing video but supports my take on the issue.

I do not agree. What the mastering engineer heard (1) may or may not be the best attainable goal for the listener, and besides, (2) What he or she heard may not be accurately represented in the recording anyway. Toole's "circle of confusion" appears at many points including, but not limited to: Microphone type and placement; mastering environment; mastering engineer's hearing and taste; et al.
At our present state of the art, perfection is not attainable, and even is not properly defineable. Some approaches are better than others, but to a large extent it is still a crapshoot. IMHO.
 

bo_knows

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I do not agree. What the mastering engineer heard (1) may or may not be the best attainable goal for the listener, and besides, (2) What he or she heard may not be accurately represented in the recording anyway. Toole's "circle of confusion" appears at many points including, but not limited to: Microphone type and placement; mastering environment; mastering engineer's hearing and taste; et al.
At our present state of the art, perfection is not attainable, and even is not properly defineable. Some approaches are better than others, but to a large extent it is still a crapshoot. IMHO.
My point was to use the same speaker that the mastering engineer used to finalize the mix. If those speakers have a way to deal with the different rooms and room acoustics (and Kii THREE do) then you will be able to hear what he intended you to hear or close to it. It's ok, we agree to disagree.
 

Jack B

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My point was to use the same speaker that the mastering engineer used to finalize the mix. If those speakers have a way to deal with the different rooms and room acoustics (and Kii THREE do) then you will be able to hear what he intended you to hear or close to it. It's ok, we agree to disagree.
I have to agree to some extent. I recall back in the 70s when loud rock groups played live venues, did recording sessions, and fans played their recordings....all with the "West Coast Sound", primarily JBL stuff. That music could not be played back the same way it was made, using the polite, recessed midrange speakers of the "East Coast Sound". They couldn't reproduce that raw energy (even if they were, in some ways, more accurate).
 
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