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Recommended inexpensive XLR or TRS cables?

rcstevensonaz

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One end: Male XLR
The other end: Female XLR

But if I attach this gender-changer to one end of the cable, is it still directional (vs. simply "gendered")? True, most XLR cables have gender for connection. But, aren't the pinouts interchangeable so that there really is no implied "direction" to the cable or the connectors?

EDIT: The fact that the equipment was designed with a standard using Female and Male connectors would lead me to believe that there are, or at least could commonly be wiring differences. But I assumed the gender was simply to help prevent accidentally connecting two instruments or two mixer cables to each other (especially in the case of a powered mic cable).

(Contrast with directional cable where ground is only attached at one end, so that it actually does matter which was the cable is "pointing"?)
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L5730

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Directional as in gendered. The shield should be connected at one end, but the ground connected at both ends (unless one has a ground loop, and then goes off standard to cure it).

That adaptor would make a male XLR connector into a female connector, so yes, it'd solve that problem, but better to not keep adding adaptors.

Just search the 'net for "XLR pinout", you'll find many examples and they all adhere to the same standard.
 

rcstevensonaz

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Directional as in gendered. The shield should be connected at one end, but the ground connected at both ends (unless one has a ground loop, and then goes off standard to cure it).
Thanks. I was under impression that the single-ended shield connection was only for unbalanced cables.
 

L5730

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Speedskater

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In some pro audio situations, XLR interconnects with the shield connected only at the send end is a good idea. Like when AC power comes from two different sources.
But microphone cables need to have the shield connected at both ends. So guess what happens when both types of cables are in the supply box.
 

BDWoody

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Can you explain that to me like I am in Kindergarten? Wait: you are referring to XLR (Male) <> XLR (Female) when you say the connector is directional?

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rcstevensonaz

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I think this discussion is a terminology thing. To me, those are gendered cables; and they are bi-directional. If your only cable was one that had the the wrong XLR gender, you can just slap on a simple gender changer and plug the sucker in... no need to rewire the cable to correct the "direction" or reverse the polarity.
 

BDWoody

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I think this discussion is a terminology thing. To me, those are gendered cables; and they are bi-directional. If your only cable was one that had the the wrong XLR gender, you can just slap on a simple gender changer and plug the sucker in... no need to rewire the cable to correct the "direction" or reverse the polarity.

Exactly. It's just to facilitate connection. Nothing about one direction or another.
 
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