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Recommendations for 2.1 system

andreasmaaan

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#41
You can also use passive filters to block low frequencies from the bookshelf speakers. You can get them in 80hz or 100hz. Put one of these behind each speaker connected to the speaker wires. Cheap solution if you don't want to get into active crossovers.
https://www.parts-express.com/100-hz-high-pass-8-ohm-crossover--266-462
These can work, but it depends on the impedance of the speakers. Best to check with us first @sophie smith if you're considering going down this path (once you know which speakers you'll be using).

For example, if you went with the Focal 906 and wanted to use Parts Express' 4Ohm 80Hz crossover, this is the effect it would have on the frequency response of the speakers:

1605457798057.png


And impedance:

1605457819925.png


So that would give you a big response peak at 85Hz, and put a lot of additional strain on your amplifier.
 

escape2

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#42
You can also use passive filters to block low frequencies from the bookshelf speakers. You can get them in 80hz or 100hz. Put one of these behind each speaker connected to the speaker wires. Cheap solution if you don't want to get into active crossovers.
https://www.parts-express.com/100-hz-high-pass-8-ohm-crossover--266-462
But wouldn't you want to implement HPF prior to amplification though, so that you can spare your speaker amp from having to amplify those low end frequencies which the speakers can't properly reproduce anyway?
 

JustJones

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#43
But wouldn't you want to implement HPF prior to amplification though, so that you can spare your speaker amp from having to amplify those low end frequencies which the speakers can't properly reproduce anyway?
I would but the OP was worried about using a HPF in the sub to amp this was just an option to filter the high frequencies without doing that.
 
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Thread Starter #44
Seems like DSP with regular sub would be pretty flexible.
Something like this:
https://www.amazon.com/Behringer-DC...eaker+management+system&qid=1605457971&sr=8-3

Or MiniDSP?

Are those easy to use if all I need is to set up HPF? I am not a sound engineer, by the way.
Can it be used for room calibration and bass management as well?
Again, are instructions pretty clear to follow?
I do have miniDSP calibration mic that I used for REW and RoomEQ for my set up.

If I can easily use external DSP, I could get two Canton subs for $500 each as Acc4less, and that would be the best option.

Any recommendations on reasonably priced external DSP with bass management and HPF?

Thanks
 
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#46
If you don't mind saving money, I highly recommend the Audioengine A5+ speakers and the matching Audioengine S8 subwoofer, although they're sold separately. Both are active speakers so you can sell/use your 20W amp somewhere else as well. The A5+ speakers are widely regarded as great little speakers and I love the sound, volume and depth of bass that the S8 subwoofer puts out-all for ~$800 US for both. The only frustrating thing is, I don't know how/where you could hear them together other than my place as they're sold separately. Audioengine also makes a more expensive set of bookshelf speakers (the HD6) which might even sound better as they use different tweeters than my A5+'s. Their speakers also offer wired/wireless options, the wireless of course being more expensive. The company is based in Austin Texas although I expect the speakers are made elsewhere. The most expensive, wireless 2.1 system they make would run you ~$1200 US The 2.1 system specs are 27hz-22khz +/-1.5db which is the flattest frequency response i've ever seen for any speakers in my life as well
 
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Thread Starter #47
If you don't mind saving money, I highly recommend the Audioengine A5+ speakers and the matching Audioengine S8 subwoofer, although they're sold separately. Both are active speakers so you can sell/use your 20W amp somewhere else as well. The A5+ speakers are widely regarded as great little speakers and I love the sound, volume and depth of bass that the S8 subwoofer puts out-all for ~$800 US for both. The only frustrating thing is, I don't know how/where you could hear them together other than my place as they're sold separately. Audioengine also makes a more expensive set of bookshelf speakers (the HD6) which might even sound better as they use different tweeters than my A5+'s. Their speakers also offer wired/wireless options, the wireless of course being more expensive. The company is based in Austin Texas although I expect the speakers are made elsewhere. The most expensive, wireless 2.1 system they make would run you ~$1200 US The 2.1 system specs are 27hz-22khz +/-1.5db which is the flattest frequency response i've ever seen for any speakers in my life as well
Thanks for the advise. Unfortunately, made in the US/Canada/Western Europe is very important to me. Otherwise, I would probably be looking at used Revels or JBL, which I think are some of the best speakers in any price range.
 
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#52
Why wouldn't it be? What's it to you?

You don't have to explain yourself. It was a bizarre question.

Your defensiveness by proxy is almost as unusual as the importance of only considering speakers that are made in specific locales (the latter being even rarer) which is why I asked but rather than actually being interested in the answer you just come across as annoyed at my asking as though you're the social moderator here of all that's right or wrong. Do you normally interrupt conversations around you, telling people what they should or shouldn't talk about? Are you really that full of yourself? Sophie Smith didn't have a problem answering my question so the fact you had a problem strongly suggests that you're pretty controlling
 
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TankTop

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#53
Just like your defensiveness by proxy is highly unusual as is the importance of only considering speakers that are made in specific locales (the latter being even rarer) which is why I asked but rather than actually being interested in the answer you just come across as annoyed at my asking as though you're the social moderator here of all that's right or wrong. Do you normally interrupt conversations around you, telling people what they should or shouldn't talk about? Are you really that full of yourself? Sophie Smith didn't have a problem answering my question so the fact you had a problem strongly suggests that you're pretty controlling
You need another bong rip.
 

andreasmaaan

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#55
Haven't tried it, but its major limitation is lack of variable delay for the subwoofer, which can be a very use (in many cases necessary) tool for integrating the sub and the mains. Also there is no EQ function.

If the budget is about $95, I would look at something like this, which has so much more functionality, including variable delays, parametric EQ, and not only variable crossover frequency but also variable filter type and slope.
 
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Thread Starter #56
Haven't tried it, but its major limitation is lack of variable delay for the subwoofer, which can be a very use (in many cases necessary) tool for integrating the sub and the mains. Also there is no EQ function.

If the budget is about $95, I would look at something like this, which has so much more functionality, including variable delays, parametric EQ, and not only variable crossover frequency but also variable filter type and slope.
Thanks.

I am looking at the minidsp as well. There is a model with DIRAC and subwoofer management plus DAC for $400. All-in-one solution.

My other thought was to use standalone Dirac Live on PC with foobar 2000 player - DAC - Active crossover - amp+sub. Hopefully Dirac would be able to take care of all the room/component calibration issues, giving me the freedom to use separate components for everything else.
 

andreasmaaan

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#57
Thanks.

I am looking at the minidsp as well. There is a model with DIRAC and subwoofer management plus DAC for $400. All-in-one solution.

My other thought was to use standalone Dirac Live on PC with foobar 2000 player - DAC - Active crossover - amp+sub. Hopefully Dirac would be able to take care of all the room/component calibration issues, giving me the freedom to use separate components for everything else.
Sounds good. The MiniDSP you mentioned is what I'd go for myself if the $400 doesn't blow the budget. Makes sense to keep it all digital until after sub/speaker crossover and room correction. And you can then sell your existing DAC, I guess? :)
 

Frank Dernie

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#58
I'm going to assume that this unit was rated 4 ohms, since manufacturers like to write higher watts on their boxes to get people to buy the higher watts units.
So to estimate your amp's performance, it would be [email protected], and approx [email protected]
In other words, the Loxjie A30 would be a decent upgrade to your amp, for not much $.
Not so.
The Decware is a valve amp and they mostly give the same power into 8 and 16 ohms but less into 4, depending on the transformed design and whether there are different transformer tappings matched to different nominal loads.
 
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Thread Starter #59
Not so.
The Decware is a valve amp and they mostly give the same power into 8 and 16 ohms but less into 4, depending on the transformed design and whether there are different transformer tappings matched to different nominal loads.
Mine supposed to be wired for the same output at 4/8 ohms, but not 16.
 

Frank Dernie

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#60
Mine supposed to be wired for the same output at 4/8 ohms, but not 16.
That sounds sensibly modern :) not as many 16ohm speakers around now as there were 50 years ago. My horns are 16 ohms, but at 109dB/watt not much power is needed. My valve amp has different outputs marked for 4 ohms and for 8 ohms is yours like that?
 

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