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Meyer Sound Amie Monitor Review

Rate this speaker:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 8 3.1%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 35 13.4%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 157 59.9%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 62 23.7%

  • Total voters
    262
OP
amirm

amirm

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A note on directivity. What research shows to be bad is dips in the mid-range. Having a step down in tweeter is not something that is researched as no such speaker was tested. I think it could be beneficial in reducing floor and ceiling bounce in hi-fi as well as their target studio use. Those reflections don't have perceptual benefits so not having them there is not going to hurt anything.
 

YSC

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A note on directivity. What research shows to be bad is dips in the mid-range. Having a step down in tweeter is not something that is researched as no such speaker was tested. I think it could be beneficial in reducing floor and ceiling bounce in hi-fi as well as their target studio use. Those reflections don't have perceptual benefits so not having them there is not going to hurt anything.
I would say maybe try to do something like in Erin plots do include separate horizontal DI also? If there’s perfect horizontal directivity like kh150 or 80x0 and the overall directivity error comes in vertical DI it could be actually beneficial
 

martin900

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Sadly, typical for the boutique brands, the price is completely insane for a small powered monitor.
 

changer

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I would say maybe try to do something like in Erin plots do include separate horizontal DI also? If there’s perfect horizontal directivity like kh150 or 80x0 and the overall directivity error comes in vertical DI it could be actually beneficial
No need for indices, just look ar horizontal and vertical reflections with @pierre’s tool:

 
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OP
amirm

amirm

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I would say maybe try to do something like in Erin plots do include separate horizontal DI also? If there’s perfect horizontal directivity like kh150 or 80x0 and the overall directivity error comes in vertical DI it could be actually beneficial
This limits directivity to 50 degrees horizontal and 40 degrees vertically on purpose.
 

FrantzM

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I will have to listen and report back. Have not been feeling well....

Please do take care of your health. Make of it a priority ...

On the Amie: I would say that if I were to purchase in that price bracket , I would lean toward something that measures better. This Meyer could well be great and good, I have seen better measurements from other highly regarded manufacturer, e,g. Genelec. The 8351B is squarely in that price bracket and I would be much more attracted to it than this model... sight unseen and no audition required.. I am at the stage, where my purchases are heavily weighed by measurements , mostly those from ASR. And on those, the 8351B is stellar, ... <placeholder for superlatives> ;).

I understand, the Amie is a very good product but to me, the value proposition would go toward Genelec.


Peace.
 

dannut

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Hi, What's your definition of compression testing? It sounds like thermal, (which is mine also).
M-Noise or whatever the new AES implementation of it is called, appears to do a good job of defining/quantifying thermal compression.
And like you say, compression is a longer term, heat-em-up, type test.

The other, and I think more prevalent form of SPL limitation (for home audio in particular), I think is excursion limiting, especially within tolerable distortion allowances.
I see excursion limiting as coming from, either drivers running out of excursion in their passbands, or amps being unable to provide needed power to reach full driver excursion.

I really wish some form of AES standardized sweep test would arise for excursion, like Meyer's M-Noise did for thermal.
Just to add, AES75 doesn't do just thermal compression. It is just one component of output testing. Another component is 'dynamic range' on top of the compression testing.

It also quantifies short-term compression. That's why we can characterize 'maximum linear output' correctly with AES75 - the output can be limited by:
  • the usual compression. Long term (eg. 1h) 2dB wide-band compression; 3dB narrow band.
  • short term compression. Music Noise has a crest factor of 17.5dB. If there is amp clipping, excursion limitation etc, it will show up on the 'correlation' graph.
Of course, there is no psychoacoustic basis for the thresholds, but we are guaranteed a 'max linear output', before audible compression takes place. All who tried to quantify distortion testing on electroacoustic systems came to the same conclusion: distortion is benign, until it isn't. There just isn't enogh force to generate audible high-order distortion components in a speakers linear operating range.
 
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YSC

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This limits directivity to 50 degrees horizontal and 40 degrees vertically on purpose.
? Sorry I do quite get that (maybe language barrier).

Could I ask if the meyer do have smooth horizontal DI and that shelf is a result in vertical DI?
 

dannut

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The 'shelf' has a reason to exist:
  • The speaker was designed to be placed on top of a console bridge, in a van etc. The main thing, is that there is a reflective surface between the listener and the speaker.
  • Due to geometry, that reflective surface causes interference peak and dip, in an 'average' situation >1500Hz
  • Combining couple of factors: woofer-tweeter c-c distance; crossover frequency; slope; tweeters horizontal dispersion - the designers managed to narrow the directivity sufficiently above 1kHz, to mitigate usual problems with placement.
  • To have smootly changing narrow directivity, one needs size. Lots of it. This speaker is small.
  • Horizontals are not affected as abruptly as the vertical. There is no driver separation and the horn has wider directivity in the horizontal plane.
  • So why not a 90x40 horn, instead a 50x40? Good question. A wide horizontal dispertion (+narrow vertical) horn needs a 'pinch' or squashed vertical dimension. Then the size suffers, or you get a 'pattern flip' - both detrimental for the intended purpose.
It is a tool. A properly engineered one.
 
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gnarly

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Just to add, AES75 doesn't do just thermal compression. It is just one component of output testing. Another component is 'dynamic range' on top of the compression testing.

It also quantifies short-term compression. That's why we can characterize 'maximum linear output' correctly with AES75 - the output can be limited by:
  • the usual compression. Long term (eg. 1h) 2dB wide-band compression; 3dB narrow band.
  • short term compression. Music Noise has a crest factor of 17.5dB. If there is amp clipping, excursion limitation etc, it will show up on the 'correlation' graph.
Of course, there is no psychoacoustic basis on the thresholds, but we are guaranteed a 'max linear output', before audible compression takes place. All who tried to quantify distortion testing on electroacoustic systems came to the same conclusion: distortion is bening, until it isn't. There just isn't enogh force to generate audible high-order distortion components in a speakers linear operating range.

Thanks for the additional info on AES75.
I never really studied the specification progress, that occured after the M-Noise.ORG era.
I'll take a better look at AES75.
 

ryanp

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Switched from Genelec to Amie about 2.5 years ago. Now have a 7.2.4 rig with 7 Amie, 2 Amie sub, and 4 up4xp.

My sound design and mixes translate better, with fewer mix notes from clients, fewer surprises from QC.

I trust what’s coming out of the Amie, a lot more than I could trust the Genelec.

However, for general at-home listening, they aren’t a colorful speaker or hyped.
 

Grotti

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A pair of Amies and the dedicated Amie subwoofer (2.1) would sum up to about 10000 Euro and 19 % VAT in addition in my country...eyewatering and a clear pass for me.
 

GXAlan

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Switched from Genelec to Amie about 2.5 years ago. Now have a 7.2.4 rig with 7 Amie, 2 Amie sub, and 4 up4xp.

My sound design and mixes translate better, with fewer mix notes from clients, fewer surprises from QC.

I trust what’s coming out of the Amie, a lot more than I could trust the Genelec.

However, for general at-home listening, they aren’t a colorful speaker or hyped.

While respecting whatever NDAs you have, can you describe what your work involves? Are you doing Atmos Music mixes, movie mixes? I imagine Atmos isn’t used for indie projects, so you must be working big budget tentpoles or streaming shows?

Can you give an example of a mix note that you would have gotten in the past which occurs less with your setup?
 

Dave Tremblay

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I’ve had the pleasure of hearing these on multiple occasions, and talking with John Meyer about the design at NAMM a few years back. I’d concur with @amirm listening comments. These have dynamics where a lot of speakers don’t. And that aligns well to my listening preference. I do care a lot about frequency response and polar response, but there are many speakers that do that well and just can’t play with musical type dynamics.

I’ve also listened to all the Genelecs, ATCs, Neumans, Kii3, JBL7, and Neumann. I won’t try to compare too much since they were in different rooms with different music. But my overall impression was that Genelec, Kii3, and Neumann do a lot of things right, especially in the near field of you don’t need to push them too hard. But there is a limit on dynamics in the mid to far field. JBL 7s seem to have a little more headroom with a pro-sound built mid and a compression tweeter. Less technically perfect on frequency response as the tradeoff. The Meyer Amie is similar, in my memory to the JBL708, but I’d like to compare them in the same space. ATC has their lower end line, which in my mind, isn’t an ATC. Unless it has the 3” Midrange done, it isn’t their sweet spot. That midrange dome is the cleanest, most dynamic, midrange I have ever heard. Bar none.

All of that said, not the JBL and the Amie have this junk coming out of the port. I wish they both would have cleaned that up. The Neumanns are stuffed completely full of absorption material. They may be giving up a little port efficiency to do that, but appears worth it. Wonder if there is a market to mid these things…
 

Ilkless

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You know people are grasping at straws when they are talking about 10% THD behaviour at 105+dB for a 6.5" speaker to try and rationalise why that sort of resonance behaviour and uneven DI is justifiable.

I think the Meyer reputation and "ecosystem" is doing a lot of heavy lifting and this would be rightly savaged by the community otherwise.
 

8T_BoCO

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Thanks, Amir. The first & only time I heard Meyer Sound equipment was in NYC/Tribeca, used at the Wetlands Preserve's sound system ('Max Creek' & 'Spin Doctors' shows ca. 1991). Excellent to see the company still makes good-sounding gear.
 

ernestcarl

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You know people are grasping at straws when they are talking about 10% THD behaviour at 105+dB for a 6.5" speaker to try and rationalise why that sort of resonance behaviour and uneven DI is justifiable.

I think the Meyer reputation and "ecosystem" is doing a lot of heavy lifting and this would be rightly savaged by the community otherwise.

Remember this?


Not even the larger Blue Horn escapes your wrath.
 

Robbo99999

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I'd love to try that track with the Amie's when they come back. That's the difference of the 708P at $4200 MSRP, which I've listed here for $2250 used and the Meyer Amie's at $8160 MSRP, but I got a discount on as demo unit.

That "little bit of headphone sound" isn't bad at all. But imagine having a sound stage that still feels like you are still engulfed by the music but you lose that headphone sound and you start to have the sense that you're there are a concert where the image is in front of you when it's supposed to be in front of you but all of the ambience is still there.

If there was a $50 upgrade, you'd probably pay it. As the price goes up, you're less likely to pay for it.

The way I look at it, it's a lot more expensive to try to remodel my listening room to be bigger, so rationalized that way, the price premium isn't as bad ;)
Ah, it was you that sent the speakers in to Amir - kudos to you!
 
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