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Lenire Tinnitus Treatment

CleanSound

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I now wear hearing protection whenever I cut grass, use snow blower, or any other power tools. I also find that it gets more pronounced after wearing my headphones, so I cut down on usage. My 2 cents!
Hearing protection is key, especially for all the young people who thinks they are Superman, I was one of them.

I'm going to see a movie later today with the family, we all will be putting in a shaved down ear plug to attenuate the volume.

You are human and you have a mortally human body. . .and only one in this lifetime.
 

Bob from Florida

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So I had my 12 week check up with my doctor. Told her that things were at best the same as before the treatment and at worst, well, worse. Told her that wearing the device would trigger tinnitus. So she suggested I stop for a week to find out if it helps. It didn't.

For the last few days, my tinnitus has been more or less continuous. This is worse than it was before the treatment. While my ability to cope with it is as good as it was before, the frequency definitely seems to have increased as has the severity.

I plan to follow up with her to figure out what makes sense to do. But for now, I have to say the treatment is totally ineffective. On top of that, the cost is high. Not just monetary but huge investment of time on daily basis to use the device. So unless you have a compelling reason to think otherwise, I would pass on this device. In my opinion, the company has way over advertised what it can do and how effective it can be.
Sorry to hear it is not working.

I had signed up for when it came to town- it just did. Now I don’t feel so bad about missing the chance to put it on last years insurance - if it is covered - deductible had been met….

Pretty much have the background tinnitus all the time, but still enjoy music thankfully. Mostly, I ignore it. The occasional adult beverage seems to put it in “overdrive“.

Perhaps one day this will get “figured out”.
 
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EJ3

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So I had my 12 week check up with my doctor. Told her that things were at best the same as before the treatment and at worst, well, worse. Told her that wearing the device would trigger tinnitus. So she suggested I stop for a week to find out if it helps. It didn't.

For the last few days, my tinnitus has been more or less continuous. This is worse than it was before the treatment. While my ability to cope with it is as good as it was before, the frequency definitely seems to have increased as has the severity.

I plan to follow up with her to figure out what makes sense to do. But for now, I have to say the treatment is totally ineffective. On top of that, the cost is high. Not just monetary but huge investment of time on daily basis to use the device. So unless you have a compelling reason to think otherwise, I would pass on this device. In my opinion, the company has way over advertised what it can do and how effective it can be.
I am more sorry that the unexpected has happened to you: getting worse is definitely an unexpected result.
 

Herbert

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As it is some of us it could be interesting to start a small, simple database: Age, frequency of the Tinnitus, one ear or both, does it seem to cover other sounds or not, circumstances it started,..? I also assume we can use our gear for that, i.e how loud the tinnitus is subjectively received, using a dB meter on a smartphone and playing the tone over our loudpeakers...?
 

Bob from Florida

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As it is some of us it could be interesting to start a small, simple database: Age, frequency of the Tinnitus, one ear or both, does it seem to cover other sounds or not, circumstances it started,..? I also assume we can use our gear for that, i.e how loud the tinnitus is subjectively received, using a dB meter on a smartphone and playing the tone over our loudpeakers...?
My wife has noticed it causes decreased hearing with her normal frequency range......
 

Joe Smith

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I had a blood test today, turns out that my thyroid is making high TSH level for my age (65), so probably headed towards a hypothyroidism diagnosis. Strong link apparently between tinnitus and low thyroid. Hopeful that this is the cause, as about three weeks ago I began experiencing tinnitus for real, with a continuous high pitched tone. I'll post more here once diagnosis is finalized and I go on the drug. Men, get your thyroid testing done as part of your physicals as we have issues with it too, not just women.

I had no other issues consistent with hypothyroidism, it was me pushing the doctor a bit to get the basic testing done...had not had this checked since 2015, even though I have annual physicals...
 

DRMLFL

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I don't want to play the "party crasher" but I can't imagine a device like this to be the cure for tinnitus. What has the tongue to do with the ears? Why not the tip of your nose? Or any other body part? And then I read the price of 4000+$. If this would work, we would already know in Germany about this product.
I am hoping as well that this happens sooner than later. It is amazing to me that we haven't solved the loss of inner hair cells.
I hope you have found a little peace with your tinnitus in the meantime. Have you tried other things in cases the tinnitus bothers you a lot?

Well, I think it is not easy to open the cochlea and replace a few hair cells with new ones (and the WHICH one) given the fact that the unfolded basilar membrane is only about 33-35 millimetres long. And how to handle the liquids in it (endolymph and perilymph). It is known that the mix of these 2 liquids will affect your hearing ability (and maybe other conditions) because of their different electrolyte concentration.
I think the concept about "hair cells" is not correct. Those are not actual hairs like on your head or the beard. From what I understand they are build much more like nails or cornea on your hand. Energy never gets lost, it just transfers into something different. So, I think the impairment comes from the liquids transferring into heat which causes the "hair cells" to melt down like "plastic" or stick together in some cases. This immobility of the "hair cells" causes the brain to hear permanent sounds. Also, don't forget there are inner AND outer hair cells with different tasks each other.
And in general, there are a 1000 reasons for tinnitus. It is also wrongly assumed that tinnitus ALWAYS comes along with hearing impairment! But it is ALWAYS good to know your audiogram.
But who knows, maybe one day it'll be possible to repair the hair cells.
 

DRMLFL

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When I read the forum, I listen to it in the background.
Thanks for sharing this!
 

CleanSound

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All - I would like to share something with you.

First let me share my story with you:

I have had tinnitus for about 2.5 years now. It came out of nowhere and instantaneously, literally within half a day, maybe less, I heard ringing and loud. During the first 2/3 months, it was really bad, I hear it even when I was outdoors. I started to do some research online on what is this noise that I am hearing (up until that point, I had no idea that a thing called tinnitus was even a thing); during my research I read someone commented on a forum stating something to the effect of: "Anyone else who thought that their tinnitus was the sound of silence when they were kids?" And holy mother effing shit, all of that memory came exploding back. . .I had tinnitus when I was a young child (my earliest memory of it was when I was around 5 or 6 years old) and it just disappeared during my childhood (don’t recall when) and I never even remembered any of it since. So I lived over 35 years of my life with absolutely no tinnitus and no recollection of ever having it, but it came back out of nowhere 2.5 years ago. This really left me believing that I always had tinnitus and somehow when I was a kid, while my brain was still developing, it had rewired itself to completely blocked out (or ignore) my tinnitus and then somehow 2.5 years ago, something happened to my brain and/or environment and the tinnitus return. Which is why I am really intrigued by Lenire, as it uses the science of neuroplasticity to rewire the brain to ignore the tinnitus.

About 4 to 6 months after the fateful day of getting sudden tinnitus, I went through TRT (tinnitus retraining therapy; most audiologists can provide this therapy). I don't want to tell you too much about TRT if you don't know about it or have not done it. But I would highly recommend you look into TRT. About 6 to 8 months into TRT, my tinnitus is manageable, and I can carry on and enjoy life with minimal nuance.

Then around late last year, I had a flare up; I suspect it was a combination of stress and hearing my tinnitus frequency (I brought a new humidifier and it makes this whistling noise that is very close to my tinnitus frequency - my tinnitus frequency is about 6,200hz, give or take). Since I still have the TRT equipment, I started TRT back up on my own, and it calm things down after few weeks (less than a month), the second round of TRT actually yield a better result on most days than the results of my first round of TRT.

Right before the flare up late last year, I wanted to do Lenire, but after reading @amirm experience, I said f that, I don't need my Tinnitus to get any worse, so I never went through with it. But when my tinnitus flared up late last year, I investigated a little bit more into Lenire, I came across another therapy that uses the same science as Lenire. It's called Neosensory (https://neosensory.com). It was cheap relative to Lenire and TRT, so I said f it, I gave it a shot. I started on new year’s day (I am not yet done with the therapy yet, the therapy treatment takes about 2 months), but. . .

So far, half way into the treatment, I can happily report to you that it has worked for me (albeit things got worse before it got better). There are many hours of most days in the past week and a half, I said to myself: damn, it's quiet, so quiet to the point that I am like where the hell did my tinnitus go? Of course, if you go looking for your tinnitus, you will find it rather fast because you are not supposed to think about it, in fact, you shouldn't even know what tinnitus is (like when I was a kid), but that's how quiet it is at certain times of the day. Also, during the daily treatment, the tinnitus disappears, even in dead quiet rooms; so, I actually look forward to the treatment each day. Sometimes, I will do the treatment for 15-20 minutes and I say heck with it, let me take a nap, I end up doing the treatment for an hour while napping and I wake up feeling great.

I want to report this to the group here, because I want you all to know about my experience with this bimodal therapy. Now, I must warn you, try at your own risk because it is based on the same science as Lenire and we have a patient here (sorry Amir) where Lenire did not work, if anything, possibly made things worse.

Separately, I also want to share some of my tricks of the trade with you.
  • I find that after a good night of sleep, my tinnitus is almost nonexistent in the morning. I read an article that popped up on my google feed several months ago where some research was done where tinnitus has some relationship with rem sleep.
  • Anecdotally, low atmospheric pressure seems to make my tinnitus worse. So, I like sea level.
  • When I am deeply focused and concentrating on something, the Tinnitus disappears, literally disappears, like now when I am so focused on writing this, despite I am writing about tinnitus. I find interesting podcasts to be helpful, because I am so focused on the topic and listening tentatively, the tinnitus disappears.
  • Anecdotally, exposure to low frequencies helps.
  • Rooms with a lot of reflections and reverbs helps A LOT. This also means my treated listening room sucks for tinnitus.
Here is another thing I'd recommend you all to do, or rather don’t do: Never talk about tinnitus with your loved ones, in case they have tinnitus and have no idea what it is and their brain has long ignored it and are living a normal life; or they were like me, who had tinnitus when they were a kid and it just disappeared. You don't want to make them aware of tinnitus if it doesn't bother them. Also, I would try not to let your loved ones stay in quiet rooms for too long and too often (I suspect, with no evidence, that being in a quiet room often and for prolong period of time along with stress is what triggered the restart of my tinnitus 2.5 years ago). Feel free to talk about tinnitus with your mortal enemies though ;). I absolutely refuse to talk about tinnitus with my family. In fact, couple of weeks ago, I was in my mom's house, and I noticed some ticking sound (it turned out to be some timer btw) and I asked my mom what is that sound, her reply: "I don't know, there are a lot of sounds that this house makes lately, like that ringing noise." Folks, my mom has tinnitus, but apparently it doesn't bother her nor does she even know what tinnitus is, so I won't be talking about anymore background sound with her ever again. Of course, if her tinnitus begins to bother her, I will pay for her TRT and Neosensory/Lenire treatment.

In the end, I want to say this to you and anyone suffering from tinnitus: It can be managed, in fact, managed to the point that it doesn't even bother you and you will live a normal life, like I am now. Think about it this way, tinnitus existed for eons, I believe I read somewhere that Socrates suffered from tinnitus; tinnitus probably existed at the point of evolution where that humanoid’s biology is capable of tinnitus. And for tens of thousands of years (if not longer), there is nothing anyone can do about it. But the science is unraveling the mysteries of this condition just in the last few years and decades alone. I am very optimistic that in the near future there will be even more science on tinnitus where a treatment (most likely some form of therapy) that is even better than bimodal treatment that Lenire and Neosensory is based on. But even without it, you can live a rather normal life, like I am now.

Sending all of you my very best regards and happy listening.
 
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Joe Smith

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Because of my recent-onset tinnitus in December, I've been working through the medical pipeline last several months, delayed because of a trip my wife and I did in January. Had an MRI finally last week and know more. I was concerned about a vestibular schwannoma, fortunately I do not have one of those, but I do have a "venous loop" near my 7th and 8th cranial nerves. Apparently this branching of the main brain blood system is quite common; the closer the loop is to the cranial nerves, the more they affect them. Probably over time, a combination of higher blood pressure and some degree of atherosclerosis changed how this loop is interacting with the nearby nerves.

Will have another diagnostic consult with the ear specialists soon, but I'm not expecting to hear that a lot can be done. Currently working on reducing blood pressure a bit, reducing caffeine and alcohol and keeping up my fitness regime. Using white noise at night to mask the sound, fortunately my wife also likes to use white noise at night. The sound I hear changes through the day a bit...less aware of it in the morning, seems to get perceptually louder as the day goes on. Is perceptually loud in the evening and less so in the early morning.

It's frustrating...the one good thing is that at least vascular loops don't grow like schwannomas, and start pushing around other things in one's head.
 

AdamG

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The sound I hear changes through the day a bit...less aware of it in the morning, seems to get perceptually louder as the day goes on. Is perceptually loud in the evening and less so in the early morning.
I have a similar morning/evening shift in consciousness from slight annoyance too can barely able to hear anything above the constant high pitch screeching. On the plus side. If I use IEM’s and music the constant test tone goes away. Being able to still enjoy music is a gift. Not complaining mind you. Chiming in that your experience is shared and may be more common than either of us thought.

Best wishes that you are able to discover some method of improvement and reduction perceptible sound. Please let us know how you progress Sir. Thank you for sharing.
 

gvl

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I’m more or less in the same boat for 3-4 months now. MRI showed nothing of concern, and the doc said sorry just deal with it. Listening to music helps as does conversing with people, too bad I’m an introvert and an engineer by work, so it’s mostly music for me :)
 

Chromatischism

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but I do have a "venous loop" near my 7th and 8th cranial nerves. Apparently this branching of the main brain blood system is quite common; the closer the loop is to the cranial nerves, the more they affect them. Probably over time, a combination of higher blood pressure and some degree of atherosclerosis changed how this loop is interacting with the nearby nerves.

Will have another diagnostic consult with the ear specialists soon, but I'm not expecting to hear that a lot can be done. Currently working on reducing blood pressure a bit, reducing caffeine and alcohol and keeping up my fitness regime. Using white noise at night to mask the sound, fortunately my wife also likes to use white noise at night. The sound I hear changes through the day a bit...less aware of it in the morning, seems to get perceptually louder as the day goes on. Is perceptually loud in the evening and less so in the early morning.
So does lying down or using an inversion table have an effect?
 

Joe Smith

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So does lying down or using an inversion table have an effect?
Not noticeably - lying down, that is. Not sure what an inversion table is...? I have questions for the ear doctor whether there are any other things that can help it. I need to bring down my BP a bit anyway so I figure there's nothing wrong with doing that anyway. I'm also having a carotid ultrasound check in a couple weeks, see if anything less than ideal with that...
 

egellings

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Not noticeably - lying down, that is. Not sure what an inversion table is...? I have questions for the ear doctor whether there are any other things that can help it. I need to bring down my BP a bit anyway so I figure there's nothing wrong with doing that anyway. I'm also having a carotid ultrasound check in a couple weeks, see if anything less than ideal with that...
I think that an inversion table is a flat bed that a person is strapped into. The angle of the bed's surface with respect to the ground can be varied because the bed is on a hinged mechanism. A person could be oriented so that the body is vertical, with head downward, or at any other angle. I do not know what utility such a bed has.
 

Chromatischism

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I think that an inversion table is a flat bed that a person is strapped into. The angle of the bed's surface with respect to the ground can be varied because the bed is on a hinged mechanism. A person could be oriented so that the body is vertical, with head downward, or at any other angle. I do not know what utility such a bed has.
It's normally used for spinal decompression. I only wondered because it seems lying down for a period of time eases his tinnitus. However it could also be due to the reduced heart rate while sleeping.
 

Joe Smith

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It's normally used for spinal decompression. I only wondered because it seems lying down for a period of time eases his tinnitus. However it could also be due to the reduced heart rate while sleeping.
Yeah, the heart rate, that's what I suspect.
 

MattHooper

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*Note: Avert your eyes if you need and MRI*

In a thread in which it seems most have tinnitus, some folks casually mentioning having MRIs blows my mind.

I say this because MRIs, due to high sound levels, are well known to be something to avoid-if-at-all-possible if you have Tinnitus and especially hyperacusis (I suffer bouts of both).

I've had 1 and 1/2 MRIs in my life, since I got T and Hyperacusis and both were devastating on my T and hyperacusis. I had to abandon the second MRI because it was too much to take and it literally took me 2 years to get over the huge spike in my tinnitus! At this point one of my biggest life fears isn't do much a disease, as having to get another MRI!

I've lived pretty well with T for decades, flaring up here and there, but just recently I've had a really bad flair up. I stayed up listening too long to loud music and usually if my ears are ringing they calm down after a while. Not this time. It was utterly brutal. Couldn't sleep, and when I'd finally nod off the sound would wake me up. I haven't had it this bad for a looong time. Usually I just get back to listening as usual, but this time I'm taking time off listening to music or movies.

I'm even considering trying Tinnitus Retraining Therapy from the same folks who treated my hyperacusis.
 
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