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pozz

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Roughly sorted according to theme, and chosen because I think they're worth listening to. The difficulty ranges from introductory to real heavy.

Part of the way I dive into a topic is to find lectures by knowledgeable people and then build archives. So maybe others will find this useful as well.

See also the Interview Library.
Psychoacoustics
Acoustics
Room Acoustics (Large & Small)
Gear
Playback
Production & Performance
Mixing, Mastering & Recording
Acoustic Music, Instruments & Musicians
Musicology, Ethnography, Anthropology
Full Courses
Sources, Channels
 
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Julf

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Nothing by j_j ?
 
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lugili

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Thanks, Pozz et al. These are mostly great videos and absolutely worth watching, not only for Newbies as the Forum chapter suggests.
I am again and again amazed about the wealth of outstanding information that can be found on the internet. Just need to find these pearls.
 

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Thanks Pozz !
On architectural acoustics, I like this one too (3-hour lecture by John Storyk)
(already suggested by Amir IIRC)
 
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anmpr1

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No matter what you think of his speaker (and related products), the interview with the late Amar Bose is worth a listen. Two highlights:

1) A funny story about how their first 'rep' took the speaker to an unnamed Manhattan high-end shop (Lyric?), placed it on the floor of the listening room for the demo, and the owner throwing the rep out.

2) A sad story about a part-time hi-fi sales associate who admitted to Dr. Bose that everyone in the store owned Bose's speaker for their personal use, but they steered customers to another brand because that manufacturer gave them a $50.00 kick back for each sale. Bose describes how it was a poor kid working for college tuition. The kid said he 'felt bad' about being a sales shill, and asked Bose what he would do in his place, if he needed the money? Bose told the kid that he honestly couldn't say. He really couldn't say that he wouldn't do the same thing in order to pay tuition and living expenses. He understood that that's the way things work most of the time.

 
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No matter what you think of his speaker (and related products), the interview with the late Amar Bose is worth a listen. Two highlights:

1) A funny story about how their first 'rep' took the speaker to an unnamed Manhattan high-end shop (Lyric?), placed it on the floor of the listening room for the demo, and the owner throwing the rep out.

2) A sad story about a part-time hi-fi sales associate who admitted to Dr. Bose that everyone in the store owned Bose's speaker for their personal use, but they steered customers to another brand because that manufacturer gave them a $50.00 kick back for each sale. Bose describes how it was a poor kid working for college tuition. The kid said he 'felt bad' about being a sales shill, and asked Bose what he would do in his place, if he needed the money? Bose told the kid that he honestly couldn't say. He really couldn't say that he wouldn't do the same thing in order to pay tuition and living expenses. He understood that that's the way things work most of the time.

Definitely (it's the first link in my post; the actual name of the talk is in the Youtube description). I also recommend listening to his entire acoustics lecture series on MIT if you're equipped with college/university-level math.
 

digicidal

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Thanks for compiling this... now I just have to find enough time to watch all of them. ;)
 

anmpr1

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Definitely (it's the first link in my post; .
That's where I found it. Going down the list. Thanks for the effort. Very appreciated.

FWIW, I was never on the Bose bandwagon, but I think I understand the appeal of his speaker in the context of the early 1970s. Back then, the going thing was the acoustic suspension speaker, typified by the AR3. The AR speaker sounded like a box. Now, you might have liked it for what it did, and it did some things better than what came before, in a small package. But it really sounded like music coming from inside a box--there was no getting around that sonic signature. The Bose didn't sound like that. It might not have sounded particularly like anything realistic that you'd ever heard before, but it didn't sound like a box. So from that perspective, it sounded more 'real' than the typical acoustic suspension engine. Because in a live event, like a symphony hall or even rock concert, you don't hear soundstage, front to back depth, pinpoint definition--you hear a massive wall of sound.

I think that was the appeal of the L100, too. It had a 'presence' that projected outside of the box; that sonic presence was noticeable the first time you heard it. I'm not saying that Bose and JBL were what we'd call accurate by today's standard, or even by the standard of the contemporary Quad electrostatic. But they both represented an alternative. They both were 'anti-box' speakers, even though they were boxes.
 
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That's where I found it. Going down the list. Thanks for the effort. Very appreciated.

FWIW, I was never on the Bose bandwagon, but I think I understand the appeal of his speaker in the context of the early 1970s. Back then, the going thing was the acoustic suspension speaker, typified by the AR3. The AR speaker sounded like a box. Now, you might have liked it for what it did, and it did some things better than what came before, in a small package. But it really sounded like music coming from inside a box--there was no getting around that sonic signature. The Bose didn't sound like that. It might not have sounded particularly like anything realistic that you'd ever heard before, but it didn't sound like a box. So from that perspective, it sounded more 'real' than the typical acoustic suspension engine. Because in a live event, like a symphony hall or even rock concert, you don't hear soundstage, front to back depth, pinpoint definition--you hear a massive wall of sound.

I think that was the appeal of the L100, too. It had a 'presence' that projected outside of the box; that sonic presence was noticeable the first time you heard it. I'm not saying that Bose and JBL were what we'd call accurate by today's standard, or even by the standard of the contemporary Quad electrostatic. But they both represented an alternative. They both were 'anti-box' speakers, even though they were boxes.
The Bose 901 and the Klipschorn in particular are really interesting historically because they're the first speakers that take room acoustics into account as part of the design itself. I'm still waiting for a proper book on the history of audio as we know it, in terms of both products and patents, and the intellectual, academic breakthroughs that changed design paradigms.
 

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I'm on a list with Steve Albini, awesome. That collection of schematics for my talk came from a good friend from the Netherlands that was laid off by, shall we say, someone from where the sun does not shine. It represents a good look into the pre-IC modular op-amp business. It was fun to show that Dick Burwen did the JE990 inductor trick in 1966.
 

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I thought this one was very entertaining. Someone who knows what they are doing making up some ad hoc ways to measure sound, pressure, acceleration etc. then getting very reasonable results.
I had the same impression. I'd love to sit with him and pick his brain one day.
 
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