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Klipsch The Fives Powered Bookshelf Speaker Review

hardisj

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#1
Full writeup is available directly on my site:
https://www.********************/loudspeakers/klipsch_the_fives/


Klipsch The Fives Powered Bookshelf Speaker Review
  • Saturday, Apr 24, 2021



Foreword / YouTube Video Review
The review on this website is a brief overview and summary of the objective performance of this speaker. It is not intended to be a deep dive. Moreso, this is information for those who prefer “just the facts” and prefer to have the data without the filler.

However, for those who want more - a detailed explanation of the objective performance, and my subjective evaluation (what I heard, what I liked, etc.) - please watch the below video where I go more in-depth.






Information and Photos

Klipsch’s The Fives is a compact powered 2-way speaker featuring a 4.5-inch midwoofer and 1-inch dome tweeter on Klipsch’s “TRACTRIX” horn. It comes with a variety of hookup options (HDMI ARC, Bluetooth, optical toslink, Turntable and RCA connections). It also comes with a remote control. The below is from the manufacturer’s website:
Enjoy superior stereo sound from a powerful and beautifully crafted tabletop system. With virtually endless connection possibilities, including HDMI-ARC, The Fives provide a better listening experience than a traditional sound bar with the same easy plug-and-play setup. Award-winning acoustics, state-of-the-art DSP, and tuning alongside discrete left and right channels, the Fives feature removable magnetic grilles, multiple finish options, and a subwoofer output. The Fives are the most versatile speakers on Earth.


MSRP is about $799 USD for a pair. However, as of this very moment they are on sale for $699/pair.
The Fives feature a built-in DSP which allows for (3) different response profiles:
  1. Dynamic Bass EQ
  2. Flat
  3. Bass Cut

My speakers arrived with only the first two modes available. The latter “bass cut” profile is available via a firmware update (link). In my research, this mode was provided in response to owners’ complaints about bloated bass. Ironically, the “flat” mode is not flat, while the “bass cut” mode is closer to flat. More on this later.
The Fives come in black and walnut with a removable grille.













CTA-2034 (SPINORAMA) and Accompanying Data

All data collected using Klippel’s Near-Field Scanner. The Near-Field-Scanner 3D (NFS) offers a fully automated acoustic measurement of direct sound radiated from the source under test. The radiated sound is determined in any desired distance and angle in the 3D space outside the scanning surface. Directivity, sound power, SPL response and many more key figures are obtained for any kind of loudspeaker and audio system in near field applications (e.g. studio monitors, mobile devices) as well as far field applications (e.g. professional audio systems). Utilizing a minimum of measurement points, a comprehensive data set is generated containing the loudspeaker’s high resolution, free field sound radiation in the near and far field. For a detailed explanation of how the NFS works and the science behind it, please watch the below discussion with designer Christian Bellmann:

A picture of the setup in my garage:



The reference plane in this test is the tweeter. A single RCA input was used and the volume was set to about 3/4 max. No grille was used and the ports were open (not stuffed).

Note about DSP Mode: I initially auditioned and subsequently tested these speakers in “Flat” DSP mode. Upon seeing the results and finishing up my review, I was informed there was a firmware update which enabled a new mode: “bass cut”. Contrary to the naming convention, “flat” was not flat and “bass cut” was a flatter bass response. I much preferred the “bass cut” mode subjectively. Therefore, I performed another round of objective testing using this mode. In this review I have provided results using “bass cut” mode. However, I do provide a single set of SPIN data using the “flat” mode. The title of each graph tells you which mode was enabled. I did no testing with the “Dynamic EQ” mode enabled.

Measurements are provided in a format in accordance with the Standard Method of Measurement for In-Home Loudspeakers (ANSI/CTA-2034-A R-2020). For more information, please see this link.

CTA-2034 / SPINORAMA:
“Flat” DSP Mode:



“Bass Cut” DSP Mode:


Early Reflections Breakout:


Estimated In-Room Response:


Horizontal Frequency Response (0° to ±90°):


Vertical Frequency Response (0° to ±40°):


Horizontal Contour Plot (not normalized):


Horizontal Contour Plot (normalized):


Vertical Contour Plot (not normalized):


Vertical Contour Plot (normalized):











Additional Measurements

On-Axis Response Linearity
Response linearity is -2.45/+4.86 dB (80Hz to 16kHz).



“Globe” Plots
These plots are generated from exporting the Klippel data to text files. I then process that data with my own MATLAB script to provide what you see. These are not part of any software packages and are unique to my tests.

Horizontal Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.



Vertical Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.





Harmonic Distortion
Harmonic Distortion at 86dB @ 1m:




Harmonic Distortion at 96dB @ 1m:




Near-Field Response
Nearfield response of individual drive units:





Response Linearity (Compression and Enhancement)
The below graphic indicates just how much SPL is lost (compression) or gained (enhancement; usually due to distortion) when the speaker is played at higher output volumes referenced to 76dB at 1 meter.

Based on my results above, it is obvious the output is quite limited somewhere above the 86dB @ 1m output level. Both the 96dB and the 102dB show significantly lowered output (>3dB loss of expected gain). This is certainly audible when listening, too, as the bass of the speakers dwindled while the highs remained as I increased the system volume. I haven’t confirmed with Klipsch if this is a built-in limiter, though, I assume it is.


In-Room Measurements from the Listening Position

Below is the actual measured in-room response (with no DSP correction). This is a spatial average taken over approximately 1 cubic foot. The speakers were placed approximately 1.2m from the front wall (not the cabinets; but the actual wall). The listening position was at 4m.

Black = Predicted In-Room Response from SPIN data
Teal = Actual In-Room Measured Response from Main Listening Position at 3.5 meters




As expected, the predicted in-room response and the actual in-room response line up quite well above approximately 500Hz.



Comparison of “Flat” vs “Bass Cut” DSP Modes
Below is a direct comparison of the on-axis response in the two different modes. As you can see, the “Flat” mode is anything but flat. Ironically, “Bass Cut” mode is flatter.





Parting / Random Thoughts
If you want to see the music I use for evaluating speakers subjectively, see my Spotify playlist.

My notes below are based on setting the DSP to “bass cut” mode. When listening in “flat” mode (which isn’t actually flat), the bass was very “thick” and just plain bad. In fact, it was some of the worse midbass I’ve heard from a speaker. Luckily, “bass cut” mode mostly resolved that.
  • Subjective listening varied between the nearfield at 1 meter and the farfield at 4 meters but was mostly at the 4 meter mark as these are marketed as being soundbar replacements and my TV is quite far from my main listening position. Subjective listening was conducted at 80-95dB at these distances. Higher volumes were done simply to test the output capability in case one wants to try to sit further away.
  • Port resonance once again rears its head and shows itself in the midrange between ~700-800Hz.
  • Depeche Mode “Enjoy The Silence” - Clap track sounds a tad forward. Bass is nice and mostly neutral but has a slight “bloom” to it.
  • “Higher Love” - Very wide soundstage with effects on the left side. Drumroll gives up ~50Hz; bass roll off here?
  • “24k Magic” - Bass sounds fuller at lower volumes (~85dB and below) vs higher levels (> ~90dB @ 4m). Definitely using a limiter here.
  • “Magic” - Left “click clock” sound is right at the speaker.
  • Soundstage depth is even with the speakers’ depth.
  • Sounds a bit “forward” or “shouty” with some tracks ~500-800Hz? (Sledgehammer - “anything” “bring yoooouur blue sky”).
  • “Free Fallin” - “too” is forward (2-4kHz?). When he hangs his notes in “freeeeee” you can hear more resonance in the 300Hz region (or so).
  • High frequency upward tilt is noticeable but harder to tell without a proper A/B, thanks to the smooth shape. Presents itself as a bit bright and sibilant, though.
  • The limiter’s effect is certainly noticeable. At low-to-mid volumes the bass is neutral and nice but as volume is increased the bass is limited while the high frequencies continue to increase causing a very strong imbalance in the timbre of the overall presentation and can become quite fatiguing. This would present itself as a problem when watching TV or movies for extended periods of time.


While this speaker isn’t necessarily my taste in overall response, I will say it is a surprisingly pleasant departure from the typical “Klipsch sound” I am used to. At least when the “bass cut” DSP mode is activated. The high frequency rise in response is smooth enough that it doesn’t stand out in a glaring way and I believe that some people may actually like this rise in response as it is more akin to a high frequency tone control, reaching about +3dB from 2kHz to 12kHz.
For those who like a “v-curve” response, you may find the “flat” DSP setting more to your liking. However, I was surprised when I saw just how many others commented on “bloated” bass. As I stated in the intro, I believe this is why Klipsch introduced the firmware update to implement the “bass cut” option, which flattens the bass and makes a noticeable improvement in my opinion.

If Klipsch would allow users the ability to shelve the high frequency via a simple tonal balance you could achieve a fairly flat on-axis response which would put this speaker in a higher performance category for my personal tastes. Of course, if you do intend to use these as a soundbar replacement you are likely to place the speaker off-axis vertically and the high frequency boost may prove beneficial. It comes down to your personal tastes and/or use as these are designed to fit a unique niche. And that brings up another aspect. There are numerous inputs with these speakers such as HDMI ARC, toslink, RCA, 3.5mm aux and Bluetooth. All these features paired with the small size and supplied remote make these a worthy consideration if you are indeed looking for a soundbar replacement.


Remember, these implement a pretty restrictive limiter to cut the bass and midrange when the SPL increases between 86dB and 96dB @ 1 meter. So, if you plan to sit far away from your speakers this may be an issue. Ideally, I would expect 2 to 3 meters listening distance would be the maximum for most people before the limiting is an issue.

As with anything else, I suggest purchasing these from a retailer who offers a return policy so you can try these out in-home.

As stated in the Foreword, this written review is purposely a cliff’s notes version. For more details about the performance (objectively and subjectively) please watch the YouTube video.


Support / Contribute
If you like what you see here and want to help me keep it going, please consider donating via PayPal via this link. Donations help me pay for new items to test, hardware, miscellaneous items and costs of the site’s server space and bandwidth. All of which I otherwise pay out of pocket. So, if you can help chip in a few bucks, know that it is very much appreciated.

Alternatively, I have provided an affiliate link in my YouTube description. If you're planning on purchasing these then doing so through that link will help me gain a small (2-4%) commission which would be appreciated.


You can also join my Facebook and YouTube pages if you would like to follow along with updates.
 
Last edited:

dfuller

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Joined
Apr 26, 2020
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#6
Surprisingly good considering, well... It's Klipsch. Thank you again, Erin!

I've actually been looking for something along these lines - my TV has probably the worst speakers I've ever heard and things are fairly unintelligible, so this might just be the ticket.
 

whazzup

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#7
Based on your in room response and the short fall <400hz (compared to estimated response, albeit at 3.5m), shouldn't you have 'preferred' the flat mode? Or is the driver behaving/distorting badly enough that you actually find it sounds bad with the default 'added' bass?
 

richard12511

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#9

napilopez

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#13
Great stuff as always. This is a reassuringly 'smooth' response, free of any real resonances or major anomalies. It's just clearly tuned to taste to some extent with the mild batman response, but indeed seems like an excellent candidate for EQ.

The directivity performance is gorgeous, and the waveguide/horn seems excellently designed. That horizontal directivity is as good as any we've seen, and even the vertical is good for a vertically aligned two-way.

It seems like if you listened to these very off axis they'd be pretty sweet -- 30 degrees looks legit -- but probably still a bit bright.
 

MZKM

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#14
Of course, if you do intend to use these as a soundbar replacement you are likely to place the speaker off-axis vertically and the high frequency boost may prove beneficial.
You mean horizontally?

It is nearly ruler flat at 30° horizontal.

I assume Dynamic EQ is as the name implies, I don’t like non-adjustable loudness controls as different content has different mastering levels, which is why I like that Audyssey has its offsets (though I wish they were a bit quicker to adjust) and some integrated amps use a dial knob.

They have a sub output ? Is the bass limiter better behaved when sub out is in use ?
Would like to know if it is actually a sub out (HPF on speaker) or just a LPF pre-out with the speakers unaffected.
 
Last edited:
Joined
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#15
You mean horizontally?

It is nearly ruler flat at 30° horizontal.

I assume Dynamic EQ is as the name implies, I don’t like non-adjustable loudness controls as different content has different mastering levels, which is why I like that Audyssey has its offsets (though I wish they were a bit quicker to adjust) and some integrated amps use a dial knob.


Would like to know if it is actually a sub out (HPF on speaker) or just a LPF pre-out with the speakers unaffected.
They do apply a proper crossover with HPF and LPF when plugging in a subwoofer.
 

Maiky76

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#17
Full writeup is available directly on my site:
https://www.********************/loudspeakers/klipsch_the_fives/


Klipsch The Fives Powered Bookshelf Speaker Review
  • Saturday, Apr 24, 2021



Foreword / YouTube Video Review
The review on this website is a brief overview and summary of the objective performance of this speaker. It is not intended to be a deep dive. Moreso, this is information for those who prefer “just the facts” and prefer to have the data without the filler.

However, for those who want more - a detailed explanation of the objective performance, and my subjective evaluation (what I heard, what I liked, etc.) - please watch the below video where I go more in-depth.






Information and Photos

Klipsch’s The Fives is a compact powered 2-way speaker featuring a 4.5-inch midwoofer and 1-inch dome tweeter on Klipsch’s “TRACTRIX” horn. It comes with a variety of hookup options (HDMI ARC, Bluetooth, optical toslink, Turntable and RCA connections. It also comes with a remote control. The below is from the manufacturer’s website:
Enjoy superior stereo sound from a powerful and beautifully crafted tabletop system. With virtually endless connection possibilities, including HDMI-ARC, The Fives provide a better listening experience than a traditional sound bar with the same easy plug-and-play setup. Award-winning acoustics, state-of-the-art DSP, and tuning alongside discrete left and right channels, the Fives feature removable magnetic grilles, multiple finish options, and a subwoofer output. The Fives are the most versatile speakers on Earth.


MSRP is about $799 USD for a pair. However, as of this very moment they are on sale for $699/pair.
The Fives feature a built-in DSP which allows for (3) different response profiles:
  1. Dynamic Bass EQ
  2. Flat
  3. Bass Cut

My speakers arrived with only the first two modes available. The latter “bass cut” profile is available via a firmware update (link). In my research, this mode was provided in response to owners’ complaints about bloated bass. Ironically, the “flat” mode is not flat, while the “bass cut” mode is closer to flat. More on this later.
The Fives come in black and walnut with a removable grille.













CTA-2034 (SPINORAMA) and Accompanying Data

All data collected using Klippel’s Near-Field Scanner. The Near-Field-Scanner 3D (NFS) offers a fully automated acoustic measurement of direct sound radiated from the source under test. The radiated sound is determined in any desired distance and angle in the 3D space outside the scanning surface. Directivity, sound power, SPL response and many more key figures are obtained for any kind of loudspeaker and audio system in near field applications (e.g. studio monitors, mobile devices) as well as far field applications (e.g. professional audio systems). Utilizing a minimum of measurement points, a comprehensive data set is generated containing the loudspeaker’s high resolution, free field sound radiation in the near and far field. For a detailed explanation of how the NFS works and the science behind it, please watch the below discussion with designer Christian Bellmann:

A picture of the setup in my garage:



The reference plane in this test is the tweeter. A single RCA input was used and the volume was set to about 3/4 max. No grille was used and the ports were open (not stuffed).

Note about DSP Mode: I initially auditioned and subsequently tested these speakers in “Flat” DSP mode. Upon seeing the results and finishing up my review, I was informed there was a firmware update which enabled a new mode: “bass cut”. Contrary to the naming convention, “flat” was not flat and “bass cut” was a flatter bass response. I much preferred the “bass cut” mode subjectively. Therefore, I performed another round of objective testing using this mode. In this review I have provided results using “bass cut” mode. However, I do provide a single set of SPIN data using the “flat” mode. The title of each graph tells you which mode was enabled. I did no testing with the “Dynamic EQ” mode enabled.

Measurements are provided in a format in accordance with the Standard Method of Measurement for In-Home Loudspeakers (ANSI/CTA-2034-A R-2020). For more information, please see this link.

CTA-2034 / SPINORAMA:
“Flat” DSP Mode:



“Bass Cut” DSP Mode:


Early Reflections Breakout:


Estimated In-Room Response:


Horizontal Frequency Response (0° to ±90°):


Vertical Frequency Response (0° to ±40°):


Horizontal Contour Plot (not normalized):


Horizontal Contour Plot (normalized):


Vertical Contour Plot (not normalized):


Vertical Contour Plot (normalized):











Additional Measurements

On-Axis Response Linearity
Response linearity is -2.45/+4.86 dB (80Hz to 16kHz).



“Globe” Plots
These plots are generated from exporting the Klippel data to text files. I then process that data with my own MATLAB script to provide what you see. These are not part of any software packages and are unique to my tests.

Horizontal Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.



Vertical Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.





Harmonic Distortion
Harmonic Distortion at 86dB @ 1m:




Harmonic Distortion at 96dB @ 1m:




Near-Field Response
Nearfield response of individual drive units:





Response Linearity (Compression and Enhancement)
The below graphic indicates just how much SPL is lost (compression) or gained (enhancement; usually due to distortion) when the speaker is played at higher output volumes referenced to 76dB at 1 meter.

Based on my results above, it is obvious the output is quite limited somewhere above the 86dB @ 1m output level. Both the 96dB and the 102dB show significantly lowered output (>3dB loss of expected gain). This is certainly audible when listening, too, as the bass of the speakers dwindled while the highs remained as I increased the system volume. I haven’t confirmed with Klipsch if this is a built-in limiter, though, I assume it is.


In-Room Measurements from the Listening Position

Below is the actual measured in-room response (with no DSP correction). This is a spatial average taken over approximately 1 cubic foot. The speakers were placed approximately 1.2m from the front wall (not the cabinets; but the actual wall). The listening position was at 4m.

Black = Predicted In-Room Response from SPIN data
Teal = Actual In-Room Measured Response from Main Listening Position at 3.5 meters




As expected, the predicted in-room response and the actual in-room response line up quite well above approximately 500Hz.



Comparison of “Flat” vs “Bass Cut” DSP Modes
Below is a direct comparison of the on-axis response in the two different modes. As you can see, the “Flat” mode is anything but flat. Ironically, “Bass Cut” mode is flatter.





Parting / Random Thoughts
If you want to see the music I use for evaluating speakers subjectively, see my Spotify playlist.

My notes below are based on setting the DSP to “bass cut” mode. When listening in “flat” mode (which isn’t actually flat), the bass was very “thick” and just plain bad. In fact, it was some of the worse midbass I’ve heard from a speaker. Luckily, “bass cut” mode mostly resolved that.
  • Subjective listening varied between the nearfield at 1 meter and the farfield at 4 meters but was mostly at the 4 meter mark as these are marketed as being soundbar replacements and my TV is quite far from my main listening position. Subjective listening was conducted at 80-95dB at these distances. Higher volumes were done simply to test the output capability in case one wants to try to sit further away.
  • Port resonance once again rears its head and shows itself in the midrange between ~700-800Hz.
  • Depeche Mode “Enjoy The Silence” - Clap track sounds a tad forward. Bass is nice and mostly neutral but has a slight “bloom” to it.
  • “Higher Love” - Very wide soundstage with effects on the left side. Drumroll gives up ~50Hz; bass roll off here?
  • “24k Magic” - Bass sounds fuller at lower volumes (~85dB and below) vs higher levels (> ~90dB @ 4m). Definitely using a limiter here.
  • “Magic” - Left “click clock” sound is right at the speaker.
  • Soundstage depth is even with the speakers’ depth.
  • Sounds a bit “forward” or “shouty” with some tracks ~500-800Hz? (Sledgehammer - “anything” “bring yoooouur blue sky”).
  • “Free Fallin” - “too” is forward (2-4kHz?). When he hangs his notes in “freeeeee” you can hear more resonance in the 300Hz region (or so).
  • High frequency upward tilt is noticeable but harder to tell without a proper A/B, thanks to the smooth shape. Presents itself as a bit bright and sibilant, though.
  • The limiter’s effect is certainly noticeable. At low-to-mid volumes the bass is neutral and nice but as volume is increased the bass is limited while the high frequencies continue to increase causing a very strong imbalance in the timbre of the overall presentation and can become quite fatiguing. This would present itself as a problem when watching TV or movies for extended periods of time.


While this speaker isn’t necessarily my taste in overall response, I will say it is a surprisingly pleasant departure from the typical “Klipsch sound” I am used to. At least when the “bass cut” DSP mode is activated. The high frequency rise in response is smooth enough that it doesn’t stand out in a glaring way and I believe that some people may actually like this rise in response as it is more akin to a high frequency tone control, reaching about +3dB from 2kHz to 12kHz.
For those who like a “v-curve” response, you may find the “flat” DSP setting more to your liking. However, I was surprised when I saw just how many others commented on “bloated” bass. As I stated in the intro, I believe this is why Klipsch introduced the firmware update to implement the “bass cut” option, which flattens the bass and makes a noticeable improvement in my opinion.

If Klipsch would allow users the ability to shelve the high frequency via a simple tonal balance you could achieve a fairly flat on-axis response which would put this speaker in a higher performance category for my personal tastes. Of course, if you do intend to use these as a soundbar replacement you are likely to place the speaker off-axis vertically and the high frequency boost may prove beneficial. It comes down to your personal tastes and/or use as these are designed to fit a unique niche. And that brings up another aspect. There are numerous inputs with these speakers such as HDMI ARC, toslink, RCA, 3.5mm aux and Bluetooth. All these features paired with the small size and supplied remote make these a worthy consideration if you are indeed looking for a soundbar replacement.


Remember, these implement a pretty restrictive limiter to cut the bass and midrange when the SPL increases between 86dB and 96dB @ 1 meter. So, if you plan to sit far away from your speakers this may be an issue. Ideally, I would expect 2 to 3 meters listening distance would be the maximum for most people before the limiting is an issue.

As with anything else, I suggest purchasing these from a retailer who offers a return policy so you can try these out in-home. If you’re in search of such a retailer, please consider using my B&H affiliate link below.
As stated in the Foreword, this written review is purposely a cliff’s notes version. For more details about the performance (objectively and subjectively) please watch the YouTube video.


Support / Contribute
If you like what you see here and want to help me keep it going, please consider donating via PayPal via this link. Donations help me pay for new items to test, hardware, miscellaneous items and costs of the site’s server space and bandwidth. All of which I otherwise pay out of pocket. So, if you can help chip in a few bucks, know that it is very much appreciated.


You can also join my Facebook and YouTube pages if you would like to follow along with updates.

Hi,


Here is my take on the EQ.

The raw data with corrected ER and PIR:


Score no EQ: 5.4
With Sub: 7.7

Spinorama with no EQ:
  • Fairly smooth
  • Decent directivity, beaming towards HF as opposed to constant directivity
  • Horn probably a bit small for a smooth transition
  • Port...
  • too much HF but you gotta hear these horns ;-)
Klipsch the Fives No EQ Spinorama.png


Directivity:
Better stay at tweeter height
Horizontally, better toe-in the speakers by 10/20deg and have the axis crossing in front of the listening location, might help dosing the upper range.
Klipsch the Fives 2D surface Directivity Contour Only Data.png


Klipsch the Fives LW Better data.png

EQ design:
I have generated two EQs. The APO config files are attached.
  • The first one, labelled, LW is targeted at making the LW flat
  • The second, labelled Score, starts with the first one and adds the score as an optimization variable.
  • The EQs are designed in the context of regular stereo use i.e. domestic environment, no warranty is provided for a near field use in a studio environment although the LW might be better suited for this purpose.
Score EQ LW: 6.5
with sub: 8.6

Score EQ Score: 6.7
with sub: 8.8

Code:
Klipsch the Fives APO EQ LW 96000Hz
April282021-172040

Preamp: -2.4 dB

Filter 1: ON HPQ Fc 39 Hz Gain 0 dB Q 1.25
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 93.3 Hz Gain -1.07 dB Q 1.29
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 487 Hz Gain -1.45 dB Q 3.3
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 1039 Hz Gain -0.56 dB Q 6.17
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 3693 Hz Gain -1.35 dB Q 2.03
Filter 6: ON PK Fc 10278 Hz Gain -1.27 dB Q 0.46
Filter 7: ON PK Fc 10486 Hz Gain -0.91 dB Q 7.25
Filter 8: ON PK Fc 14433 Hz Gain -2.3 dB Q 3.52

Klipsch the Fives APO EQ Score 96000Hz
April282021-171414

Preamp: -2.3 dB

Filter 1: ON HPQ Fc 38.75 Hz Gain 0 dB Q 1.25
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 97.3 Hz Gain -1.00 dB Q 0.89
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 490.5 Hz Gain -1.78 dB Q 2.8
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 1067 Hz Gain -1.12 dB Q 4.5
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 3695 Hz Gain -1.53 dB Q 1.8
Filter 6: ON PK Fc 10292 Hz Gain -2.15 dB Q 0.38
Filter 7: ON PK Fc 10157 Hz Gain -0.91 dB Q 6.63
Filter 8: ON PK Fc 14411 Hz Gain -3.18 dB Q 4.38
Klipsch the Fives EQ Design.png


Spinorama EQ LW
Klipsch the Fives LW EQ Spinorama.png


Spinorama EQ Score
Klipsch the Fives Score EQ Spinorama.png


Zoom PIR-LW-ON
Klipsch the Fives Zoom.png


Regression - Tonal
Klipsch the Fives Regression - tonal.png


Radar no EQ vs EQ score
some small improvements
Klipsch the Fives EQ Radar.png


The rest of the plots is attached.
 

Attachments

pierre

Addicted to Fun and Learning
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#18
and because choice is always good, here is another EQ that change the score from 5.6 to 6.7:
Score details below:
Code:
NBD  ON 0.29 0.20
NBD  LW 0.28 0.16
NBD PIR 0.26 0.19
SM  PIR 0.73 0.97
SM   SP 0.90 0.97
LFX       48   45
LFQ     0.49 0.51
-----------------
Score    5.6  6.7
-----------------
+5.61 +6.75 Klipsch The Fives
EQ is below (I would keep only the first 9):

Code:
EQ for Klipsch The Fives computed from EAC data
Preference Score 5.6 with EQ 6.7
Generated from http://github.com/pierreaubert/spinorama/generate_peqs.py v0.7
Dated: 2021-04-28-10:43:49

Preamp: -1.0 dB

Filter  1: ON PK Fc 14680 Hz Gain -4.17 dB Q 0.15
Filter  2: ON PK Fc  7231 Hz Gain +1.05 dB Q 2.04
Filter  3: ON PK Fc   490 Hz Gain -1.71 dB Q 4.36
Filter  4: ON PK Fc 14604 Hz Gain -1.25 dB Q 4.10
Filter  5: ON PK Fc   602 Hz Gain -0.41 dB Q 12.00
Filter  6: ON PK Fc  1048 Hz Gain -0.86 dB Q 7.44
Filter  7: ON PK Fc   735 Hz Gain +1.46 dB Q 12.00
Filter  8: ON PK Fc  7169 Hz Gain -0.21 dB Q 12.00
Filter  9: ON PK Fc  3608 Hz Gain -0.71 dB Q 4.60
Filter 10: ON PK Fc  5460 Hz Gain +0.42 dB Q 4.67
Filter 11: ON PK Fc   936 Hz Gain -0.52 dB Q 12.00
Filter 12: ON PK Fc   815 Hz Gain +0.87 dB Q 12.00
Filter 13: ON PK Fc  1291 Hz Gain +0.42 dB Q 12.00
Filter 14: ON PK Fc   763 Hz Gain -0.51 dB Q 12.00
Filter 15: ON PK Fc  9050 Hz Gain +0.29 dB Q 6.63
Filter 16: ON PK Fc  2676 Hz Gain -0.54 dB Q 12.00
Filter 17: ON PK Fc 11428 Hz Gain +0.37 dB Q 12.00
Filter 18: ON PK Fc 10228 Hz Gain -0.34 dB Q 12.00
Filter 19: ON PK Fc  2390 Hz Gain -0.50 dB Q 12.00
Filter 20: ON PK Fc  2254 Hz Gain +0.54 dB Q 12.00
filters0.png
filters2.png
filters1.png
 

maverickronin

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#19
The measurements look surprising good. The low output before the limiter kicks in a a bit of a disappointment, but the huge number of different inputs it has will definitely make these worth it some people.
 
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hardisj

hardisj

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Thread Starter #20
You mean horizontally?
I mean vertically. Most TV setups I see with a soundbar have the soundbar not at ear height. So, if you have cabinets or something like that then you are unlikely to have the speakers directly on axis with your ears, vertically. YMMV, of course.
 

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