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Kii/8C PSI shootout at Kore Studios

Thomas savage

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The Watchman
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I wonder if many musicians are more focused on symbolic content in recordings (i.e. notes, harmonic relationships, playing style, etc.) rather than the more concrete aspects of recording quality and reproduction. As long as those symbolic aspects of the music are intelligible, the replay equipment is fit-for-purpose.

Then again, violinists are known to fixate on the tonal variations between Stradivarii . . .
I thought this yesterday when reading though this thread, umm,, intresting .
 

RayDunzl

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‘How many folks that have been on tv have bought this ‘ .. I think we could at last be onto a measurement that would carry meaning for everyone.
You may be on to something there.

I confess I was in the audience for this show (but not this episode)

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And just to reinforce the point of conjecture, this one, too...

1544123645708.png
 
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I think it would be fascinating to see what different parts of the brain were most active while listening to reproduced music for:

1. A professional musician
2. An audiophile
3. An audio engineer
4. Someone who is none of the above

Perhaps this has been covered in Sacks' and Levitan's books on music and neuroscience.
 

andreasmaaan

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I think it would be fascinating to see what different parts of the brain were most active while listening to reproduced music for:

1. A professional musician
2. An audiophile
3. An audio engineer
4. Someone who is none of the above

Perhaps this has been covered in Sacks' and Levitan's books on music and neuroscience.
I'm reading Sacks now. No mention of it thus far...
 
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The first high-end audio system I ever saw was in the home of a former Boston Symphony member. His principal instrument cost substantially less than his audio system. (Needless to say, he was not a string player.)

I'm a former musician, too, and got into this hobby largely because of my interest in listening to classical music.
I remember being a very poor undergrad piano student and one day having to go to my teacher's home for a catch up lesson. I walked into the music room and saw an entire wall stacked with thousands of CDs. This was the late eighties when the format was still relatively new and at a premium price. Unfortunately I didn't take note of the replay system.
 

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