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JP Denon blog claims that feet/spikes improve audio quality of speakers and other audio equipments. Is that true?

vroad

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Is this even remotely true? I doubt it. For CD players, maybe those feet help a little if the speakers are on the same shelf, but why put cables/power amps on them?
The article even calims that materials and shapes of the feet, how many number of points (3 or 4 points) you use to support the equipment, also matters a lot.

The article refers to feet/spikes as "insulators". Somehow those products seem to be called differently in Japan.

For speaker feet, I've seen Ethan Winer's article on expensive speaker isolation products:

Ethan says that the majority of sound comes from speaker driver's cone. If so how wooden feet make the sound warm and metal ones make the sound clearer, like Denon blog article claims?

I doubt that speaker feet matters a lot in most cases at least for speakers, as long as the speaker is a good one, is placed on a sturdy speaker stand, and is not audibly rattling.
If the speaker is not very great and has not enough damping material in it, using expensive feet probably won't help.
If the speaker has already good amount of damping material in it, then feet probably won't matter much in terms of audio quality.

If the speakers are on a desk, feet might help in preventing you from feeling the vibration transmitted from the speakers, even when it's not rattling.

I attached screen shots of blog articles translated to English with Google Translate.
If you want to read full article in English you could use Google Translate or DeepL for that.

Speaker placement article also says the same thing about "insulators".
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GXAlan

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It’s probably exaggerated but what might be accurate and reasonable is this

“suppresses the transmission of vibration between the two speakers”

In their setup on that table, and presumably the design of many Japanese homes, maybe the resonances from one speaker can affect the other.
 

Ken Tajalli

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From what I remember, spikes on speakers were designed to penetrate carpets, to seat the speakers firmly on the floor-boards.
It was argued that the flexible carpet would allow the speaker cabinet/baffle to dance back and forth with music muddying up bass.
There was some truth to that.
But on amps and CD players, it was a marketing ploy to cash in on the idea.
 
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vroad

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It’s probably exaggerated but what might be accurate and reasonable is this

“suppresses the transmission of vibration between the two speakers”

In their setup on that table, and presumably the design of many Japanese homes, maybe the resonances from one speaker can affect the other.
Even if the speaker stands are on the wooden floor, most of vibrations came from the speakers are killed by damping material inside the speakers and the stands before actually becoming a problem, unless you play extemely loud, I guess.
 
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vroad

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From what I remember, spikes on speakers were designed to penetrate carpets, to seat the speakers firmly on the floor-boards.
It was argued that the flexible carpet would allow the speaker cabinet/baffle to dance back and forth with music muddying up bass.
There was some truth to that.
But on amps and CD players, it was a marketing ploy to cash in on the idea.
But spikes won't do any good for bookshelf speakers placed on shelves like in Denon's blog article, no?
 

GXAlan

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But spikes won't do any good for bookshelf speakers placed on shelves like in Denon's blog article, no?

“Funny thing, it produced so much bass that combined with its smooth plastic base, it slid back 1 inch on my metal stand!”


So it’s definitely possible….

But possibility and probability are two different things.
 

Ken Tajalli

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But spikes won't do any good for bookshelf speakers placed on shelves like in Denon's blog article, no?
I did not look at the blog.
i suppose.
Spikes were couplers, not insulators.

Just glanced at the blog, it's BS!
It is talking about cable lifters, don't waste your time on it.
 
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vroad

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I did not look at the blog.
i suppose.
Spikes were couplers, not insulators.

Just glanced at the blog, it's BS!
It is talking about cable lifters, don't waste your time on it.
Yeah it looks marketing BS to me, too.

It's sad to see that a bigger company like Denon (or D&M Holdings?) is spreading misinformation on their blog. It seems that many people in Japan only read Japanese information and don't even bother reading ASR posts or blog articles from independent experts.

I have one of their products, AVR-X3800H. While it's not recommended by amir for having worse objective performance than last gen, it's doing good enough job for me.
 

DJNX

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Speakers can make things resonate. Make something with enough square meters resonate and you have yourself a phantom speaker (just like reflections).

It’s all dependent on how your room is constructed and materials. For bookshelves, sturdy stands are enough to resolve the problem.
 

Thomas_A

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Spikes do not improve sound. Debunked long time ago.
 
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