• WANTED: Happy members who like to discuss audio and other topics related to our interest. Desire to learn and share knowledge of science required as is 20 years of participation in forums (not all true). There are daily reviews of audio hardware and expert members to help answer your questions. Click here to have your audio equipment measured for free!

JBL SCL-7 Review (In-wall Speaker)

Rate this speaker:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 29 24.6%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 68 57.6%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 21 17.8%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    118

nathan

Active Member
Joined
May 24, 2020
Messages
283
Likes
202
Non toed-in speakers/additional options?
In my particular situation the screen wall is an existing wall shared with a basement pantry and tool closet. Because of this I have a lot of leeway on the types and depths of speakers I can use. I wanted to retain the existing flat wall as a baffle wall, but It's not critical that I stick with shallow 4" deep in-wall speakers. It also isn't critical that I enclose the backs of the speakers. The primary attraction of some in-wall speakers, like the SCL-7 and the Monitor Audio IDC models, is the built-in ability to have an offset while keeping flush mounting on a flat wall.

I had been under the impression that infinite baffle setups are preferable if they are practical for a situation, and in my situation I can leave the backs of the speakers completely unenclosed instead of in a stud bay. I thought this would have benefits in less internal reflections within the speaker, less resonance (ports/etc), and less back pressure so the drivers can move more quickly and freely. Is my thinking wrong?

Toe in is not necessary with these speakers, given your use case / audience size / geometry.

A sealed stud bay IS how they are designed to sound best, and that is definitely what I would do. If you want to consider other designs, please consult with JVC via your dealer to get the engineering requirements for other installation approaches. Chances are good, the best performance will be to use them as designed (in a closed stud bay) but their engineering team may have recommendations about alternatives.

Vertical dispersion/second row
I'm planning to optimize sound for the main row as the second row will be truly "secondary". As long as they can understand the dialogue and enjoy some subwoofer drama, I'm sure everyone back there will be very very happy. My plan is to have the tweeters vertically centered behind the screen, and first row eye level around 1/3rd of the way up the screen.

I would try to position the tweeter at the same height as the primary listener’s ears. What you describe sounds like the tweeter will be noticeably higher than that, more like at the ear height of the second row. That will compromise the sound for the front row.
 

sumitagarwal

Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2022
Messages
80
Likes
13
Toe in is not necessary with these speakers, given your use case / audience size / geometry.

A sealed stud bay IS how they are designed to sound best, and that is definitely what I would do. If you want to consider other designs, please consult with JVC via your dealer to get the engineering requirements for other installation approaches. Chances are good, the best performance will be to use them as designed (in a closed stud bay) but their engineering team may have recommendations about alternatives.



I would try to position the tweeter at the same height as the primary listener’s ears. What you describe sounds like the tweeter will be noticeably higher than that, more like at the ear height of the second row. That will compromise the sound for the front row.
Thanks, I will plan on tweeters at front row level or, at highest, directly in between front and second row ear level. My intention with having the tweeters at the centerline of the screen was to anchor the audio to the action.

If using three identical speakers instead of mirrored left and right speakers, do you have any thoughts on going with conventional front or sealed speakers instead of "in-wall" models?
 

nathan

Active Member
Joined
May 24, 2020
Messages
283
Likes
202
Thanks, I will plan on tweeters at front row level or, at highest, directly in between front and second row ear level. My intention with having the tweeters at the centerline of the screen was to anchor the audio to the action.

I like the way you are thinking about it. However, the tweeters are the center of the screen will just result in less accurate sound for ears that are not at the center of the screen. That is the one main design “flaw” with these speakers — very narrow vertical dispersion. It can actually be useful AS LONG AS your ears are at the same height as the tweeters.

So, if your ears are going to be at 1/3 screen height, I would get the tweeters as close to that position as possible. It wont negatively impact the spatial perception of onscreen sound, imo, at all.
 

nathan

Active Member
Joined
May 24, 2020
Messages
283
Likes
202
If using three identical speakers instead of mirrored left and right speakers, do you have any thoughts on going with conventional front or sealed speakers instead of "in-wall" models?

This is a can of worms question. Sure, there are excellent stand alone speakers you could choose. And it sounds like you are willing to cut open the wall, and use space behind it, so you have lots of options. If you open the space to be a like a large closet behind the screen that is 4 or 5 feet deep, and sealed with drywall so that you have effectively increased the size of your room, with a false wall holding the screen, then you have lots more options.

The key piece is to use any particular speaker correctly. If you try in room instead of in wall models, I would, if possible, personally stick with non ported models that are designed to be crossed over to a set of subwoofers. These are often labeled ”LCR” speakers by manufacturers.

I would also pay attention to their output capabilities, to make sure I can get the volume needed at the seats. Many otherwise great speakers (like the KEF LS50) will wither and die trying to send 100 db peaks to people sitting 20 feet way, through a transparent screen.

Finally, if you do build out the room behind the screen to accommodate other speaker options, you might as well pay attention to what the overall new room length is by this addition of a few feet to the room length, since the relationship between that length, the seating location and the subwoofer locations can create or mitigate standing wave issues.

But we are way far afield of the intention of this review thread, so these are all better discussed in new threads.
 

sumitagarwal

Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2022
Messages
80
Likes
13
This is a can of worms question. Sure, there are excellent stand alone speakers you could choose. And it sounds like you are willing to cut open the wall, and use space behind it, so you have lots of options. If you open the space to be a like a large closet behind the screen that is 4 or 5 feet deep, and sealed with drywall so that you have effectively increased the size of your room, with a false wall holding the screen, then you have lots more options.

The key piece is to use any particular speaker correctly. If you try in room instead of in wall models, I would, if possible, personally stick with non ported models that are designed to be crossed over to a set of subwoofers. These are often labeled ”LCR” speakers by manufacturers.

I would also pay attention to their output capabilities, to make sure I can get the volume needed at the seats. Many otherwise great speakers (like the KEF LS50) will wither and die trying to send 100 db peaks to people sitting 20 feet way, through a transparent screen.

Finally, if you do build out the room behind the screen to accommodate other speaker options, you might as well pay attention to what the overall new room length is by this addition of a few feet to the room length, since the relationship between that length, the seating location and the subwoofer locations can create or mitigate standing wave issues.

But we are way far afield of the intention of this review thread, so these are all better discussed in new threads.
Greatly appreciated. I have a thread over here: https://www.audiosciencereview.com/...se-options-toe-in-enclosure-volume-etc.37741/
 
Top Bottom