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JBL 705P / 708P

watchnerd

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watchnerd

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The 705P and 708P have an RJ45 network connector labeled HiQNet.

I'm still don't understand very much about HiQNet, other than it seems to be a tuning and calibration system. Maybe @amirm or someone else with Harman connections can shed insight.

Here is the introductory video; there are 11 more in the series!

 

watchnerd

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A comparison comment from a thread on Gearslutz (pro audio site):

"I know a mixer with both the 708 and 705s and he said you can't really tell a difference until you start comparing the deep low end at high levels. Of course the 708 prevails in that situation, but the 705 holds up extremely well, which is what I've heard in demos of the 705s."
 

amirm

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My company does a lot of business in 7 series. Sadly I have not yet heard them myself.

HiQnet is Harman's digital interconnect. It makes it a breeze to interconnect everything that way and get both data and audio.
 

watchnerd

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My company does a lot of business in 7 series. Sadly I have not yet heard them myself.

HiQnet is Harman's digital interconnect. It makes it a breeze to interconnect everything that way and get both data and audio.
Thanks, @amirm

Do you think it's appropriate for 2 channel?

Is it also something a regular user can figure out, or does it require a week long training course?
 

amirm

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Do you think it's appropriate for 2 channel?
You mean the speakers or HiQnet? If the former, as I mentioned I have yet to listen to them so nothing to offer. Our application at work is for home theater.
 

watchnerd

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The only question I have is how does the room EQ work.

Tim
Yeah...

They keep saying 'Room EQ', but I don't see any inputs for microphones. Perhaps it's just based on wall / free / corner. Or maybe you input your room dimensions, it calculates the Schroeder frequency, and does some magic?
 

Old Listener

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Thanks, watchnerd. I've been on the edge of my chair waiting for news of a new 4-series from JBLpro. These powered 7 series monitors are quite interesting to me.

At $ 2000 each, the 708P is more than I wanted to pay. I could spend that much but I don't want to.

At $ 1000 each, the 705P is at the upper end of what I wanted to pay.

My application is for 2 channel music (only) in a ~ 20 by 15 foot room with a flat 9 foot ceiling. We would be listening at a distance of 7-9 feet with average volume levels in the 75-85 dB range.

There are a variety of pro audio monitors but it will be good to have a JBL alternative to consider. Some of the other alternatives are from foreign companies; I always wonder about how solid their presence in the USA will be in the future.

I look forward to seeing good reviews and thoughtful comments by users.
 

watchnerd

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Thanks, watchnerd. I've been on the edge of my chair waiting for news of a new 4-series from JBLpro. These powered 7 series monitors are quite interesting to me.

At $ 2000 each, the 708P is more than I wanted to pay. I could spend that much but I don't want to.

At $ 1000 each, the 705P is at the upper end of what I wanted to pay.

My application is for 2 channel music (only) in a ~ 20 by 15 foot room with a flat 9 foot ceiling. We would be listening at a distance of 7-9 feet with average volume levels in the 75-85 dB range.

There are a variety of pro audio monitors but it will be good to have a JBL alternative to consider. Some of the other alternatives are from foreign companies; I always wonder about how solid their presence in the USA will be in the future.

I look forward to seeing good reviews and thoughtful comments by users.
I listen to a fair number of monitor speakers (Dynaudio, Focal, Neumann, ATC, JBL, Adam, Eve, Yamaha), both for my hobby (volunteer recording engineer assistant) and at home (I have 3 different pairs).

IMHO, not having read a review or heard the new P versions of the 7 series, there are a few features that make these a bit unique:

1. The wave guide. Yes, other monitors have waveguides but the measurements (and my personal experience with the 305s) lead me to believe the Harman version is currently a bit ahead in terms of what it does for their dispersion goals.

2. The compression drivers. I don't know of another monitor speaker at $999/each that includes a 0.5" compression driver.

3. The multiple included EQ/DSP options. Genelec's new models do have a lot of customization here, but not at this price and, from the little I can tell, not as many choices.

4. Size. The 705P is *tiny*. That should be good for reducing vibrations and diffraction.

5. Inputs. The Neumann KH120D also has both analog XLR and digital BNC inputs, but they're $1249 each, don't go quite as deep, quite as loud, or have as many EQ options.
 

Old Listener

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My comments in bold type.

I listen to a fair number of monitor speakers (Dynaudio, Focal, Neumann, ATC, JBL, Adam, Eve, Yamaha), both for my hobby (volunteer recording engineer assistant) and at home (I have 3 different pairs).

IMHO, not having read a review or heard the new P versions of the 7 series, there are a few features that make these a bit unique:

1. The wave guide. Yes, other monitors have waveguides but the measurements (and my personal experience with the 305s) lead me to believe the Harman version is currently a bit ahead in terms of what it does for their dispersion goals.

That is the impression that I've gotten from reading reviews of the 3 series and the m2. The idea of using the waveguide to allow for a more seamless transition at the crossover sounds interesting.

2. The compression drivers. I don't know of another monitor speaker at $999/each that includes a 0.5" compression driver.

I'll be interested to see what practical benefit it provides. Less compression of dynamics?

3. The multiple included EQ/DSP options. Genelec's new models do have a lot of customization here, but not at this price and, from the little I can tell, not as many choices.

How do you measure response in the room, analyze it, produce some parameters for the EQ/DSP options and get them into the monitors.

4. Size. The 705P is *tiny*. That should be good for reducing vibrations and diffraction.

Small enclosures are easier than bigger ones. That might have some effect on the huge price difference between the 705P and the 708P.

5. Inputs. The Neumann KH120D also has both analog XLR and digital BNC inputs, but they're $1249 each, don't go quite as deep, quite as loud, or have as many EQ options.

Digital input on an XLR connector doesn't seem a good fit for me. An XLR analog input would be usable but some newer monitors also have an unbalanced input on a RCA phono connector.

Power consumption info would be good. Some newer pro audio monitors have low power modes when the input is idle for some period.

The current info has my interest up but I really want to see reviews, user reports and a look at a detailed manual.
 

watchnerd

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#18
My comments in bold type.



Digital input on an XLR connector doesn't seem a good fit for me. An XLR analog input would be usable but some newer monitors also have an unbalanced input on a RCA phono connector.

Power consumption info would be good. Some newer pro audio monitors have low power modes when the input is idle for some period.

The current info has my interest up but I really want to see reviews, user reports and a look at a detailed manual.
We'll probably see manuals before reviews.

I don't recall ever reading a professional review for the i-versions and they've been out for about 3 years.
 

amirm

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Sorry, I meant HiQnet.
Sure. It is a multi-channel digital transport and it works for any number of channels. In my multi-channels system it interconnects the expansion I/O module for the main DSP which is in a separate box. And I can play stereo as well as multi-channel with it. Did I answer your question?
 

watchnerd

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Sure. It is a multi-channel digital transport and it works for any number of channels. In my multi-channels system it interconnects the expansion I/O module for the main DSP which is in a separate box. And I can play stereo as well as multi-channel with it. Did I answer your question?
Yes, thank you!
 
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