• WANTED: Happy members who like to discuss audio and other topics related to our interest. Desire to learn and share knowledge of science required as is 20 years of participation in forums (not all true). Come here to have fun, be ready to be teased and not take online life too seriously. We now measure and review equipment for free! Click here for details.

Is the end of an analogue volume knob always perfectly channel balanced?

PaulD

Active Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2018
Messages
242
Likes
531
#2
Probably... Perfect is difficult to achieve in anything, I'm assuming 0.1dB or better is "perfect" here.

For an analogue pot style of volume control, then there could still be some residual contact resistance even at the end stops, but it is probably "perfect".

For a switched attenuator style of volume control (which should have "perfect" channel balance anyway), then unless it is faulty the maximum setting will be perfectly balanced.

Digital attenuator volume controls already have perfect channel balance.

Hope that helps!
 

solderdude

Major Contributor
Joined
Jul 21, 2018
Messages
4,920
Likes
8,996
Location
The Neverlands
#4
If volume control attenuates the volume, then does cranking it to 100% provide perfect channel balance?
It actually depends on how the resistance track and mechanical construction is made. In the vast majority of cases the 'max. position' is simply a contact point. At that point the resistance track is not in circuit anymore and completely in parallel to the signal.
So in the majority of cases... yes L-R should be (near) perfect.
However, there could well be a balance control or amplifier circuits inside with tolerances that, for some reason, are high enough to be measurable.
So even when the pot has perfect L-R tracking there may be other aspects of the entire device that f' things up.
 

Wombat

Major Contributor
Joined
Nov 5, 2017
Messages
5,776
Likes
4,438
Location
Australia
#5
I use the balance control to adjust if needed. It helps with some recordings, also.

But if the imbalance is not referenceable it probably doesn't matter. :)
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom