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Is the Aiyima A07 the best 'cheap class-D amp'?

NewbieAudiophileExpert

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I currently have a Fosi Audio BT20A-S and it's quite good, but i've heard everybody raving on about the A07 - so i'm curious to know if it's as good as people claim?

On this topic, i've also looked at the Loxjie A30 and it seems like a really solid option as is has a great DSP, headphone amp/DAC, and amplifier.

What's everybody's thoughts on this topic?
 

Selkirks

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Killer amp for the price. I just got one after seeing reviews/comments and it didn't disappoint.
 

mightycicadalord

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I love mine but looking back I think the loxje would be better as I could use the dsp.

Well nevermind the loxjie has considerably less power.
 
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D

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I currently have a Fosi Audio BT20A-S and it's quite good, but i've heard everybody raving on about the A07 - so i'm curious to know if it's as good as people claim?
On this topic, i've also looked at the Loxjie A30 and it seems like a really solid option as is has a great DSP, headphone amp/DAC, and amplifier.
What's everybody's thoughts on this topic?

Amir's review is here...


First lets have a look at the Fosi TPA3116 ... I've probably set about 30 TPA3116 amplifiers up as "sound bar killers" for friends and clients. They're pretty good little amps. But in the typical Chinese style, you are not going to get 100w/ch out of it... in all truth you will get about 45w/ch on 4 ohms and 30w/ch on 8 ohms ... and yes, that is more than enough for most people.

The TPA3255 chip is next generation Class D from Texas Instruments, one big step improved over the 3116. Here you can reasonably expect 180w/ch on 4 ohms and 100w/ch on 8... but with far lower distortion and greatly improved linearity. So yes, it's a better chip.

The Aiyima A07, is a good amp. Don't think otherwise. But you also have to realize the limitations of the way the 3255 chip is implemented in this case. First it's in a sealed enclosure, with no ventillation so you are going to run into thermal limitations long before you reach maximum power (which requires a 48v 8 amp power supply.) The amp is supplied with a 32volt supply which is probably the best compromise between performance and longevity. On 32 volts you will get about 100w/ch on 4 ohm loads and 60w/ch on 8 ohms.

The power bricks also warrant comment. These bricks are designed for other uses and adopted by the amplifier makers as off the shelf parts. They are designed to be plugged in with no load and then have the load connected later. Turning the AC on and off with the amplifier connected will eventually kill the power supply due to the huge inrush of current with both the supply's internal filtering and the even larger filters in the amp when AC is first turned on. The answer is to plug it in and leave it powered on, all the time.

I have about a dozen in client use now and they're all happy as clams. One came back with a small problem that I was easily able to fix and my personal one had a problem with a bad IC socket under one of the op-amps which, after more than normal head scratching, is now fixed and working fine.

So... if you are looking for a really nice 60w/ch amp and you hook it up and leave the AC on continuously, using the standby switch on the amp to turn it on and off... you're in luck... this is a great choice.
 
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phoenixdogfan

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I just bought one and will be using it to power the Kef HTS 3001 SE center channel speaker that is scheduled to arrive Monday.
 
OP
N

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Amir's review is here...


First lets have a look at the Fosi TPA3116 ... I've probably set about 30 TPA3116 amplifiers up as "sound bar killers" for friends and clients. They're pretty good little amps. But in the typical Chinese style, you are not going to get 100w/ch out of it... in all truth you will get about 45w/ch on 4 ohms and 30w/ch on 8 ohms ... and yes, that is more than enough for most people.

The TPA3255 chip is next generation Class D from Texas Instruments, one big step improved over the 3116. Here you can reasonably expect 180w/ch on 4 ohms and 100w/ch on 8... but with far lower distortion and greatly improved linearity. So yes, it's a better chip.

The Aiyima A07, is a good amp. Don't think otherwise. But you also have to realize the limitations of the way the 3255 chip is implemented in this case. First it's in a sealed enclosure, with no ventillation so you are going to run into thermal limitations long before you reach maximum power (which requires a 48v 8 amp power supply.) The amp is supplied with a 32volt supply which is probably the best compromise between performance and longevity. On 32 volts you will get about 100w/ch on 4 ohm loads and 60w/ch on 8 ohms.

The power bricks also warrant comment. These bricks are designed for other uses and adopted by the amplifier makers as off the shelf parts. They are designed to be plugged in with no load and then have the load connected later. Turning the AC on and off with the amplifier connected will eventually kill the power supply due to the huge inrush of current with both the supply's internal filtering and the even larger filters in the amp when AC is first turned on. The answer is to plug it in and leave it powered on, all the time.

I have about a dozen in client use now and they're all happy as clams. One came back with a small problem that I was easily able to fix and my personal one had a problem with a bad IC socket under one of the op-amps which, after more than normal head scratching, is now fixed and working fine.

So... if you are looking for a really nice 60w/ch amp and you hook it up and leave the AC on continuously, using the standby switch on the amp to turn it on and off... you're in luck... this is a great choice.
Hey there, thanks for the response - indeed, i don't need more than a bit of power for my whole living room to light up.

I've got a raspberry pi with volumio connected via USB to a topping D10S, which in turn feeds an analog signal to the Fosi BT20A-S, which drives a pair of Edifier's P17s which i got for half price (New!).

This combo sounds spectacular for the price - and the speakers although dirt cheap ($65AUD), don't sound it at all IMO - i prefer this to my Samsung Q70T soundbar + sub which is connected to my TV.

They are 5-20 watts in power requirements and 20 watts is wayyyyyy too much noise, so they probably only use 5-10 watts of power when operating in my living room.
 
D

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Hey there, thanks for the response - indeed, i don't need more than a bit of power for my whole living room to light up.

I've got a raspberry pi with volumio connected via USB to a topping D10S, which in turn feeds an analog signal to the Fosi BT20A-S, which drives a pair of Edifier's P17s which i got for half price (New!).

This combo sounds spectacular for the price - and the speakers although dirt cheap ($65AUD), don't sound it at all IMO - i prefer this to my Samsung Q70T soundbar + sub which is connected to my TV.

They are 5-20 watts in power requirements and 20 watts is wayyyyyy too much noise, so they probably only use 5-10 watts of power when operating in my living room.

Actually, most living room listening happens at about 1 watt.

Figure you have speakers rated for about 86 or 88 db/watt. Normal conversation is at about 70db (give or take). So, if you are able to talk over the music you can't be very far above 75 db... still less than a watt.

Fair to say that most people wildly over-estimate their needs here...

You won't go wrong with the Aiyima ... you'll get better sound quality, which I assume is your goal.

Cheers!
 
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NewbieAudiophileExpert

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Actually, most living room listening happens at about 1 watt.

Figure you have speakers rated for about 86 or 88 db/watt. Normal conversation is at about 70db (give or take). So, if you are able to talk over the music you can't be very far above 75 db... still less than a watt.

Fair to say that most people wildly over-estimate their needs here...

You won't go wrong with the Aiyima ... you'll get better sound quality, which I assume is your goal.

Cheers!
Yeah, it doesn't take much to get some good vibrations going through the air from the edifiers.

Would you say that the A07 can rival the LOXJIE A30.
 

jdg78

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I have both the Aiyima A07 and Loxjie A30. They are both very good units in my opinion, but also very different and fill different needs.

The Loxjie is a DAC/ Speaker amp/Headphone amp/Bluetooth combo, that works ideally as part of a desktop setup or as an all-in-one solution for a small living room or den. It performs very well, sounds great, and has a variety of input options. I've had it hooked up to the Focal tower speakers in my main living room system, as well as smaller, less efficient speakers in my home office and it had no problem driving either one of them to satisfying levels, and sounded great in both setups.

The Aiyima A07 is just a simple power amplifier - it only accepts a single analogue connection, no DAC or Bluetooth, so all the sound processing will have to be done in a separate unit. I currently have it hooked up to the preamp outs of a 5.1 surround processor powering the main speakers in my home theater system and it works great - very punchy, clean sound, and dead quiet background.

Unless you are trying to drive very inefficient speakers to ear-splitting levels in a large room, I wouldn't be concerned about the power output of either unit - both should perform just fine.

If you already have a preamp/DAC source that you're happy with and are just looking for a source of power to drive speakers, I would say get the Aiyima and save yourself the extra money. It's an incredible bang-for-your-buck at $80.

But if you need something with digital inputs and processing capabilities, the Loxjie is a very good option for its price.
 
OP
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NewbieAudiophileExpert

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I have both the Aiyima A07 and Loxjie A30. They are both very good units in my opinion, but also very different and fill different needs.

The Loxjie is a DAC/ Speaker amp/Headphone amp/Bluetooth combo, that works ideally as part of a desktop setup or as an all-in-one solution for a small living room or den. It performs very well, sounds great, and has a variety of input options. I've had it hooked up to the Focal tower speakers in my main living room system, as well as smaller, less efficient speakers in my home office and it had no problem driving either one of them to satisfying levels, and sounded great in both setups.

The Aiyima A07 is just a simple power amplifier - it only accepts a single analogue connection, no DAC or Bluetooth, so all the sound processing will have to be done in a separate unit. I currently have it hooked up to the preamp outs of a 5.1 surround processor powering the main speakers in my home theater system and it works great - very punchy, clean sound, and dead quiet background.

Unless you are trying to drive very inefficient speakers to ear-splitting levels in a large room, I wouldn't be concerned about the power output of either unit - both should perform just fine.

If you already have a preamp/DAC source that you're happy with and are just looking for a source of power to drive speakers, I would say get the Aiyima and save yourself the extra money. It's an incredible bang-for-your-buck at $80.

But if you need something with digital inputs and processing capabilities, the Loxjie is a very good option for its price.
Hey there, thanks for your detailed response - appreciate it.

I like both of the products based on reviews, it's just that Loxjie A30 sort of 'stands out' as it has quality DAC and amplifier components for the headphones AND the speakers, plus the DSP.

I'm sort of interested in the A30 for that reason, but i've heard reports that the A07 is better in terms of sound quality (mostly based on CheapAudioMan's review).

Hmmm.
 

muslhead

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Crazy question ...
Will the aiyima drive a 60 ohm hp without an issue?
If so, what do you think its max power output would be?
 
D

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Crazy question ...
Will the aiyima drive a 60 ohm hp without an issue?
If so, what do you think its max power output would be?

The A07 is a Class D power amplifier. Its outputs are in BTL mode. Its output filters are designed for 6 ohms, giving compatibility from 4 to 8 ohm loads. It is not intended to run headphones.
 

jdg78

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Amir's review is here...


First lets have a look at the Fosi TPA3116 ... I've probably set about 30 TPA3116 amplifiers up as "sound bar killers" for friends and clients. They're pretty good little amps. But in the typical Chinese style, you are not going to get 100w/ch out of it... in all truth you will get about 45w/ch on 4 ohms and 30w/ch on 8 ohms ... and yes, that is more than enough for most people.

The TPA3255 chip is next generation Class D from Texas Instruments, one big step improved over the 3116. Here you can reasonably expect 180w/ch on 4 ohms and 100w/ch on 8... but with far lower distortion and greatly improved linearity. So yes, it's a better chip.

The Aiyima A07, is a good amp. Don't think otherwise. But you also have to realize the limitations of the way the 3255 chip is implemented in this case. First it's in a sealed enclosure, with no ventillation so you are going to run into thermal limitations long before you reach maximum power (which requires a 48v 8 amp power supply.) The amp is supplied with a 32volt supply which is probably the best compromise between performance and longevity. On 32 volts you will get about 100w/ch on 4 ohm loads and 60w/ch on 8 ohms.

The power bricks also warrant comment. These bricks are designed for other uses and adopted by the amplifier makers as off the shelf parts. They are designed to be plugged in with no load and then have the load connected later. Turning the AC on and off with the amplifier connected will eventually kill the power supply due to the huge inrush of current with both the supply's internal filtering and the even larger filters in the amp when AC is first turned on. The answer is to plug it in and leave it powered on, all the time.

I have about a dozen in client use now and they're all happy as clams. One came back with a small problem that I was easily able to fix and my personal one had a problem with a bad IC socket under one of the op-amps which, after more than normal head scratching, is now fixed and working fine.

So... if you are looking for a really nice 60w/ch amp and you hook it up and leave the AC on continuously, using the standby switch on the amp to turn it on and off... you're in luck... this is a great choice.

Just to clarify, re: AC power for the Aiyima - are you saying it's better to keep it plugged into an active power source at all times, and then just power it up by flipping the on/off switch when you want to use it? Or to actually keep it fully powered up w/ the switch in the on position at all times?

I currently have mine plugged into a power conditioning strip that I turn off when not in use to save energy, but based on your comments I'm wondering if this is not a good idea.
 
D

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Just to clarify, re: AC power for the Aiyima - are you saying it's better to keep it plugged into an active power source at all times, and then just power it up by flipping the on/off switch when you want to use it? Or to actually keep it fully powered up w/ the switch in the on position at all times?

Plugged in with AC power on all the time.
Use the switch on the front of the amplifier to turn it "on" and "off".

I currently have mine plugged into a power conditioning strip that I turn off when not in use to save energy, but based on your comments I'm wondering if this is not a good idea.

Not the best plan.

When you turn off the AC power to the "brick", the DC rail in the brick and in the amplifier will drain to 0 volts in about a minute.
Then when you turn the AC back on there is a huge inrush of current trying first to get the power supply started up, then to charge that DC rail in both the brick and the amplifier back up to 32 volts (or whatever other voltage you are using). Given that the brick probably has about 470uf caps and the amplifier has 2200uf that current surge can hit 10 amps for about a quarter second then tapering off until those big capacitors are charged. This puts a very heavy load on the power supply during that start up phase and eventually it will kill it.

The front panel switch on the amplifier is arranged to avoid that. When you turn the amplifier "off" all you are really doing is shutting down the TPA3255 chip. Those big caps are still connected to a live power supply so they are constantly charged and ready to go. No more big rushes of current to start them up. Your power supply will last years longer.

All the hints for this are there ... no power switch on the supply, standby switch on the amp, pilot led on the supply... etc. It is clear it is intended to be plugged in, connected to the amplifier and left on all the time.

When "off" the amplifier draws about 20ma of current ... less than an LED night light, so it's not like you're saving any real power.
 

andrewjohn007

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Just to clarify, re: AC power for the Aiyima - are you saying it's better to keep it plugged into an active power source at all times, and then just power it up by flipping the on/off switch when you want to use it? Or to actually keep it fully powered up w/ the switch in the on position at all times?

I currently have mine plugged into a power conditioning strip that I turn off when not in use to save energy, but based on your comments I'm wondering if this is not a good idea.
I ran an A07, A3001, A04 and a TI EVM3255 all using Meanwell SMPS PSUs for approximately 18 months and routinely used the rocker switch on a power bar in lieu of the toggles on the Aiyima amps Never had any issues whatsoever. That doesn't really answer your inquiry or fit your use scenario, but I thought I'd share my experience. Aiyima makes a pretty solid product for the price IMHO. Eventually, I upgraded to ICEPower, however I can't complain about their performance as they served me well.

EDIT: Blake seems to know what he's talking about... So I'd likely defer to his knowledge of electronics over my personal experience....
 
D

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I ran an A07, A3001, A04 and a TI EVM3255 all using Meanwell SMPS PSUs for approximately 18 months and routinely used the rocker switch on a power bar in lieu of the toggles on the Aiyima amps Never had any issues whatsoever.

The meanwells are industrial supplies. They are built to withstand the startup inrush of current ... the cheapy bricks supplied with these amplifiers are not.

(I'm fully aware that it should not be like this ... but it is... and we have to deal with it as it is)
 

andrewjohn007

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The meanwells are industrial supplies. They are built to withstand the startup inrush of current ... the cheapy bricks supplied with these amplifiers are not.

(I'm fully aware that it should not be like this ... but it is... and we have to deal with it as it is)
Appreciate the clarification!
 
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