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If all headgear transducers were to be tuned the same, would it actually hurt the userbase?

nyxnyxnyx

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I've read and joined discussions now and then about what is considered as an ideal FR target. Obviously, Harman target is there in all discussions I've read, oftentimes people would bring up both pros and cons (i.e: it's how music is supposed to be performed, or how it's *just* a preference from a certain part of consumers). There are indeed more popular target like our own version at ASR, for IEMs there's the widely featured IEF target from Crinacle. There are probably more but I just can't remember them all at the moment

And in many topics, I can see many people complaining about the sound is not reaching a certain target, or that it doesn't have the peaks and dips those people perceive as desirable. But to me I've always thought that, if one can accept EQ for the literal meaning of it (equalization), we can always make adjustment to fit that target better, provided that there are folks who can guide the community to do it.

I wonder that if the entire industry decided to tune every pair of headphones or IEMs to a famed "ideal" FR, what cemented benefits would we have? Some people said that having to EQ something so much to make it sound better to them is a bad thing, as manufacturers should have ensured that they will sound great straight out of box already. But I think that if everything was to be tuned so similarly, wouldn't we lose the "fun" factor as a consumer or enthusiast?
We would know that all the upcoming products will be more or less scarily identical to older products (backed by the idea that FR is the main reason why they sound good or bad), so there will be less diversified and unique experiences for us all.

I used to have a pair of hd650 and dt990, while the dt990 is indeed very fiery in upper octaves, it was a night-and-day difference in comparison with the hd650, and that satisfied me as someone who wanted to try different "flavors" of sound. I know the driver types, shell materials and so on will likely to contribute to the finalized sound, but I'm not sure if they can sound so different if the FR is exactly the same.
 

DeepFried

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you're assuming all headphones can be tuned to match a frequency response curve. Perhaps they can with the right technology, metamaterials and so on, but certainly the traditional model of a cup (with or without damping) a dynamic driver (with or without damping) and pads can only do so much.
 

xpop

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Hello @nyxnyxnyx, as usual for any transducer what matters to all of us is the lowest possible distortion level. We all know that the frequency response for many headphones is always deep in the midrange, which is fine for most of us, but what really makes the difference is the fidelity of the note, the lowest distortion possible.
 
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nyxnyxnyx

nyxnyxnyx

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you're assuming all headphones can be tuned to match a frequency response curve. Perhaps they can with the right technology, metamaterials and so on, but certainly the traditional model of a cup (with or without damping) a dynamic driver (with or without damping) and pads can only do so much.
yeah, I'm putting a big if in it. I know the result varies alot, like for example it's much less consistent with dynamic drivers while it's easier with BA.

assuming that if it can be done in the future, what will be the pros and cons in your opinion?

Hello @nyxnyxnyx, as usual for any transducer what matters to all of us is the lowest possible distortion level. We all know that the frequency response for many headphones is always deep in the midrange, which is fine for most of us, but what really makes the difference is the fidelity of the note, the lowest distortion possible.
I see, I tend to agree with that too. distortion way below audible range is optimal. I think since you can always EQ the headphones into the preferred FR, as long as the drivers are capable it will bring great results.
 

ADU

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People buy headphones for a wide variety of reasons. Not just for their FR. So I think the hobby would continue, even if all headphones were tuned the same.

I don't think there's really anyone who wants this though. Nor do I think it will happen any time soon. I think there are some good reasons for doing it though.
 
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