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Idea room size for mixing/mastering?

EPC

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Dec 11, 2020
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#1
Building myself a studio in the garden but not too sure of the best dimensions/ratios to use...

Anyone have any experience or advance you could give for sizing the studio?!
 

andreasmaaan

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Jun 19, 2018
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#2
Within reason, the bigger the better frankly :) A larger room will push the modal behaviour down lower in frequency, making it easier to handle through sub placement and EQ. Also, later reflections are more easily filtered out by the brain than earlier ones.

The main reason to keep the size down would be to save on costs. Having said that, a smaller room can also be made to work well with good treatment. You can always make a room acoustically bigger with broadband absorption. Also, if the walls are lossy enough, room modal behaviour is more easily controlled.

There are a couple of good textbooks on this topic, plus lots of articles online. I’m just boarding a flight now but can send you some links later on..
 

DualTriode

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Oct 24, 2019
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#4
Hello,

If you look at room size for music performance in the architectural design books any room size in your home or garden will be “small”. It is about wavelength vs. room dimensions. In your home or garden you will always have the bass pressurizing the space.

See this video about Schroeder Frequency.


Build it, have fun with it, don’t worry be happy.

Thanks DT
 

Cbdb2

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Sep 8, 2019
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#5
It is about wavelength vs. room dimensions. In your home or garden you will always have the bass pressurizing the space. DT
Its also about construction. Studs and drywall resonate and can be broadband LF absorbers. Concrete is another story. The shape also matters. LF modes depend on the room dimensions so try to make the room L W and H non multiples. So a room thats 10' tall 20' long and 10' wide is he worse. Skewing walls also helps with room modes.
 
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