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How to equalize the right way, slow or sudden adjustment in terms of frequency?

PeterHans

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Hi @ everyone,

I have a beginner question.
Let's say have an active speaker (speaker XY) which was measured and has peaks in treble, let's say: 6000 - 10000 Hz +4dB

So I install Equalizer APO:
Option 1: I use an adjustment which starts to slowly decrease between 5k and 6K stays the same til 10k and slowly goes up again. But we already have a slight decrease in the area of 5000 to 5999 Hz which is not a zone with "problems".

2021-06-05_102622.png


Option 2: I say it should decrease and increase instantly exactly at the measured, to be improved zone:

2021-06-05_102523.png


Which one is the right way? The 2nd option looks harsh by eye but I can't translate in terms of audio, would somebody please enlighten me? :)
 
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PeterHans

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the best one is the one that fits better your target curve, you shouldn't equalize for the sake of equalizing.
Your EQ should be the inverse of the frequency response deviation. Option 2 is not even remotely plausible.

Thanks for the answers. You're right I never put it that way. A measured speaker with flaws will never have a peak from 0 to +4 between (for example) 5999 and 6000 Hz, it will always have a starting point and a peak but in between is always an area where it slowly rises or falls. So my equalizer settings should act like a mirror. Option 1 looks like a more realistic preset, Option 2 can't be the case, at least I never saw any measurement in which any speaker acted that way.

Referring to my example, if there is a speaker which has a peak between 6000 - 1000 Hz of +4dB, there has to be already a slight increase in the area of 4000 Hz or 5000 Hz, which should always result in a kind of exponential form, before and after.
 

RayDunzl

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To figure out what the "graphic EQ" sliders actually do to the frequency response, you'd need to know the Q of the filters.

Take a look at this page for some hints:

https://jlaudio.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360000622028-VXi-Parametric-Equalization

Play pink noise - route the output at the PC through REW - you'd expect a flatline on an RTA display - and wiggle the filter sliders to see the actual effect on the frequency response.

In the original post, Option 1 is closer, but still not what will happen.

Option 2 won't happen.
 
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