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How NOT to test studio audio equipment

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fpitas

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KRK and Adam are about the point of surpassing the others as reference speakers. KRK especially is killing the competition. Adam is only 20 years old but blowing people away. The guy isn't American though. What American doesn't know about JBL and their ability to pump out bass?
JBL is known internationally, at least for those who appreciate pro gear.
 

fpitas

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They are known for home audio. Car stereos.
In the last few years they made inroads into those areas. Unfortunately. But I'd hope anyone who has been associated with pro audio knows who JBL is.
 
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In the last few years they made inroads into those areas. Unfortunately. But I'd hope anyone who has been associated with pro audio knows who JBL is.
And some people are using JBL studio monitors but it is a very different game. In a sense studio engineers don't care how good speakers and headphones sound. Only that they are an accurate representation of sound. JBL and all home audio, whether headphones or speakers make things to attract home users. Flatness is almost irrelevant. I had a JBL system in my Avalon. It was great. My Prius audio sucks. I have JBL bluetooth. Pumps out nice bass as do my bluetooth headphones but they fit like a vice. JBL is just not that vested in the studio market. KRK is. That's their only business basically. Adam is coming on like a housefire because they aren't just flat, they sound really good. So don't get me wrong, engineers want a flat response, but sounding amazing doesn't hurt. And the JBLs I heard in Guitar Centers listening room were not that balanced. They added big horns that threw off their bass response. Neumann, on the other hand is a staple in the recording environment. It's not surprising they want to creep into the headphone and speaker sector. But they haven't made much of a dent yet.
 

fpitas

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I wasn't sure about his technical prowess, but that backwards baseball cap soon convinced me.
Yeah. You don't like to stereotype, but that usually has bad connotations.
 
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Actually Neumann is making some inroads. But basically they are known for the best mikes on the planet.

 
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Kalis are another up and comer like Adam.

 
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Tanny is the other one along with Yamaha that have a long history in the studio. Would audiophiles like them? I seriously doubt it.

 

Cbdb2

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Ever been in a studio?

From https://www.mixonline.com/technology/1977-urei-813-studio-monitors-383665

"The new 813B version debuted in 1983. Later that year, Putnam sold the business to Harman, with UREI becoming a division of JBL Professional; the 813C, a new model with all JBL drivers, launched in 1984. But in its various incarnations, the UREI 813 was the most successful large-format studio monitor ever made."

 

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Ever been in a studio?

From https://www.mixonline.com/technology/1977-urei-813-studio-monitors-383665

"The new 813B version debuted in 1983. Later that year, Putnam sold the business to Harman, with UREI becoming a division of JBL Professional; the 813C, a new model with all JBL drivers, launched in 1984. But in its various incarnations, the UREI 813 was the most successful large-format studio monitor ever made."

Well. it is not fair to compare low budget monitors, like those in the video, with Urei 813, I just checked on Reverb: $2500. The JBL entry level monitors are mediocre as any other in the OP selection.

 
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Well. it is not fair to compare low budget monitors, like those in the video, with Urei 813, I just checked on Reverb: $2500. The JBL entry level monitors are mediocre as any other in the OP selection.

You can look up the highest rated at any price and find Yamaha Rokit and Adam in that list. Who cares what was good in 1977? Speakers have improved. Just like headphones, though the early 90s produced a lot of things still highly popular: https://www.querytools.net/Images/RTGS1.jpg
Those "Entry Level" speakers are just smaller versions of ones in expensive studios. So people might talk about 5s instead of 7s or 8s. Yamaha NS10s used to be a big deal. As were Tannoys but I don't remember the models.
 

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You can look up the highest rated at any price and find Yamaha Rokit and Adam in that list. Who cares what was good in 1977? Speakers have improved. Just like headphones, though the early 90s produced a lot of things still highly popular: https://www.querytools.net/Images/RTGS1.jpg
Those "Entry Level" speakers are just smaller versions of ones in expensive studios. So people might talk about 5s instead of 7s or 8s. Yamaha NS10s used to be a big deal. As were Tannoys but I don't remember the models.

Yamaha NS10 are the industry standard not because is a good monitor but precisely for the opposite reason: NS10 represent the average domestic speaker that everyone can have in their living room. That type of monitor become (in the end of 70’s) the reference for this exact reason. One of the most famous sound engineer of that era, Bob Clearmountain, use to carry with him from studio to studio so that he had a consistent reference and he wanted something that he felt was representative of typical hi-fi speakers. A legend tells that he used to stick toilet paper on the tweeter in order to dull their over-bright balance.
For the same reason, Auratone also were famous: it was the reference to emulate the sound of little transistor radio that everyone used at that time.

info:

Different story fo Adam or Hedd monitors: they are certainly used in recording studios, we are not talking about the A7V, but in models that cost 20x more. Never seen instead, a professional recording studio using KRK, those are used only by DJ's and bedroom producers. Basically, all the so-called $200 "studio monitors", even those made by prestigious manufacturers are actually wannabe studio monitors, which have nothing to do with the real thing.
 
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Yamaha NS10 are the industry standard not because is a good monitor but precisely for the opposite reason: NS10 represent the average domestic speaker that everyone can have in their living room. That type of monitor become (in the end of 70’s) the reference for this exact reason. One of the most famous sound engineer of that era, Bob Clearmountain, use to carry with him from studio to studio so that he had a consistent reference and he wanted something that he felt was representative of typical hi-fi speakers. A legend tells that he used to stick toilet paper on the tweeter in order to dull their over-bright balance.
For the same reason, Auratone also were famous: it was the reference to emulate the sound of little transistor radio that everyone used at that time.

info: https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/yamaha-ns10-story

Different story fo Adam or Hedd monitors: they are certainly used in recording studios, we are not talking about the A7V, but in models that cost 20x more. Never seen instead, a professional recording studio that uses KRK, those are used only by DJ's and bedroom producers. Basically, all the so-called $200 "studio monitors", even those made by prestigious manufacturers are actually wannabe studio monitors, which have nothing to do with the real thing.
Yes, I have been in a studio. For the past 30 years.
 

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dfuller

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If I'm honest:

The big studios don't give a crap about brands like KRK or for the most part Adam or similar.

No, this is the territory of ATC, PMC, big JBLs (figure the 708Ps are the small end of things), big Neumanns, Genelec, and the like.
 

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If I'm honest:

The big studios don't give a crap about brands like KRK or for the most part Adam or similar.

No, this is the territory of ATC, PMC, big JBLs (figure the 708Ps are the small end of things), big Neumanns, Genelec, and the like.
Some time ago I had a session in a studio that used the Adam twin speakers as main monitors (I don't remember the model): I have to tell you that they are very precise, slightly bright but on point
 
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Yamaha NS10 are the industry standard not because is a good monitor but precisely for the opposite reason: NS10 represent the average domestic speaker that everyone can have in their living room. That type of monitor become (in the end of 70’s) the reference for this exact reason. One of the most famous sound engineer of that era, Bob Clearmountain, use to carry with him from studio to studio so that he had a consistent reference and he wanted something that he felt was representative of typical hi-fi speakers. A legend tells that he used to stick toilet paper on the tweeter in order to dull their over-bright balance.
For the same reason, Auratone also were famous: it was the reference to emulate the sound of little transistor radio that everyone used at that time.

info:

Different story fo Adam or Hedd monitors: they are certainly used in recording studios, we are not talking about the A7V, but in models that cost 20x more. Never seen instead, a professional recording studio using KRK, those are used only by DJ's and bedroom producers. Basically, all the so-called $200 "studio monitors", even those made by prestigious manufacturers are actually wannabe studio monitors, which have nothing to do with the real thing.
I've recorded everything on here with $90 Sony MDR 7506 and a $130 AKG2035 mike. Why in god's name would I throw away money on $1,500 headphones or $10,000 monitors? So I can boast about money? Elitism has no place in the world of art and music.

 
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Some time ago I had a session in a studio that used the Adam twin speakers as main monitors (I don't remember the model): I have to tell you that they are very precise, slightly bright but on point
They're not just flat and accurate, they sound gorgeous. I am trying to sell my KRK to buy a pair. Not enough room for both at the present.
 

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Why should a 20-year-old test his speakers with 70s music? It's a sound he has never heard and probably never will: OP statement doesn't make any sense.
Also, the point that electronic music is fake and acoustic music is real was a very popular discussion 40 years ago and it didn't lead to anything, bringing it up today is totally boomer.

The choice of studio monitors is very personal and no measurement or youtube review can replace direct listening (real listening, not from a youtube video), the only advice I can give to anyone who wants to buy those monitors in the video is: don't do it, they are all bad. Save a little more and choose something better
The idea of also looking at the age cohort that such YouTubers are targeting is certainly not wrong. It's not mine, that’s for sure. I can't imagine encountering this young man in a classical music concert. Different worlds, probably with different demands on studio monitors, depending on the preferred program material. (Yes, I have been in studios and sound labs more often).
 
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