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Genelec 8030 Pair sounding bad in my room, better HiFi speaker alternatives?

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#1
I got these when I was doing a lot of critical listening in a treated area and they sounded great, but these days I don't find myself doing any critical listening as I've changed jobs.

Wanting to sell the Genelec pair and get some speakers that would sound great in a relatively untreated room. Dynaudio Xeo 10's look interesting but would have to add some extra cash on top of the money from the Genelec sale.

Any advice appreciated as I do not have much knowledge on the HiFi area of speakers.
 
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Thread Starter #3
495cmx415cmx265cm, monitors are on stands on my desk, around 50cm away from the wall. The desk sits in the middle of one of the long walls. I find that in particular certain low end frequencies and a lot of dialogue both have quite noticeable increases in volume compared to the rest of the sounds that come through the speakers.
 

q3cpma

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#4
495cmx415cmx265cm, monitors are on stands on my desk, around 50cm away from the wall. The desk sits in the middle of one of the long walls. I find that in particular certain low end frequencies and a lot of dialogue both have quite noticeable increases in volume compared to the rest of the sounds that come through the speakers.
You're describing room modes, others speakers going at least as low will have the same problem or worse.
 

Eetu

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#5
I agree with @q3cpma, these are room issues and you'd have to face them with other speakers as well.

For mids & highs left-right symmetry is key (same distance to the side walls for both speakers). For bass it's your listening position (front-back location) in the room. I would experiment with the distance to the front wall.

Do you have a calibration mic so you can see what's going on in the room?
 
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Thread Starter #6
Thank you @q3cpma and @Eetu. I don't have a calibration mic, just been using test tones within some DAWs to hear what frequencies are exaggerated. 120 to 125hz in particular sounds horrendously louder than anything else. Is there much I can do without a calibration mic?
 

daftcombo

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#7
Thank you @q3cpma and @Eetu. I don't have a calibration mic, just been using test tones within some DAWs to hear what frequencies are exaggerated. 120 to 125hz in particular sounds horrendously louder than anything else. Is there much I can do without a calibration mic?
It's the moment to put them on stands then. Or turn on the desk correction EQ behind.
Must you probably tried it before.
 

BDWoody

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#8
Thank you @q3cpma and @Eetu. I don't have a calibration mic, just been using test tones within some DAWs to hear what frequencies are exaggerated. 120 to 125hz in particular sounds horrendously louder than anything else. Is there much I can do without a calibration mic?
You can certainly play with and get to a better place, but I'd suggest seeing what you can do for about $75 with this and REW.

Those speakers are worth working with imo.

https://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1
 
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