• WANTED: Happy members who like to discuss audio and other topics related to our interest. Desire to learn and share knowledge of science required as is 20 years of participation in forums (not all true). There are daily reviews of audio hardware and expert members to help answer your questions. Click here to have your audio equipment measured for free!

Gaia Isolation anything in this?

Purité Audio

Master Contributor
Industry Insider
Barrowmaster
Forum Donor
Joined
Feb 29, 2016
Messages
5,607
Likes
5,563
Location
London
This chap shows a reduction in IMD when using these isolation products,
The manufacturer states,
“The reduction in vibrations can be explained by the way that IsoAcoustics isolation manages the energy of the speaker to reduce internal reflections. The vibrations when spikes are used is greater in comparison because the vibrations are hitting the solid surface and conducted back to create internal reflections.”
I am highly sceptical are these just cup and ball with a sorbathen footer?
Keith
 

sq225917

Major Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2019
Messages
1,236
Likes
1,354
I'd put my money on it being that the blocks he used first weren't as secure as he thought. Certainly nothing like three spikes into a slab floor. And the feet either have enough compliance in them to level out a very slight mismatch in height and thus contact pressure or they're just a better impedance match then a couple of large flat surfaces which don't really offer a defined path to sink vibrations through.

I'd like to see it vs three spiked feet.
 

Matias

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 1, 2019
Messages
3,593
Likes
6,777
Location
São Paulo, Brazil
This is what the manufacturer measured: no change in frequency response, but a lot less cabinet vibration, which probably is the reduction in IMD show in the 1st post.

index.php
 

fpitas

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 7, 2022
Messages
2,039
Likes
2,316
Location
Northern Virginia, USA
While the feet are pretty, and the vibration absorbers probably are valid, my go-to has been a carpet sample glued to the cabinet bottom.
 

dorakeg

Active Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2022
Messages
150
Likes
86
I think they might be very useful for those who place their speakers on a table.

No doubt they are fancy feet, but the damping part should work as advertised. Of course someone could diy something similar at much lower cost.
 

dorakeg

Active Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2022
Messages
150
Likes
86
This chap shows a reduction in IMD when using these isolation products,
The manufacturer states,
“The reduction in vibrations can be explained by the way that IsoAcoustics isolation manages the energy of the speaker to reduce internal reflections. The vibrations when spikes are used is greater in comparison because the vibrations are hitting the solid surface and conducted back to create internal reflections.”
I am highly sceptical are these just cup and ball with a sorbathen footer?
Keith

I am not sure what's inside these feet. But vibration damping isn't something new. So, I am sure it does work in terms of reducing vibration.

Having said that, we can make something similar at far lower prices, although results might not be as good (but close enough). I use 4 small pieces of foam pads that cost $2.

These feet aren't expensive to make, just that it's quite time consuming to try out various materials and combination.
 

Chrispy

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Feb 7, 2020
Messages
4,843
Likes
3,641
Location
PNW
I'm a huge sceptic myself but there's also these
 

dorakeg

Active Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2022
Messages
150
Likes
86
I'm a huge sceptic myself but there's also these

Why are you skeptical? People have been trying different ways to reduce the cabinet vibration for a long time. While I cant say if there is any audible improvement, I am pretty sure many methods do reduce the vibration to a certain extent.

So what this company did is to package it into a nice looking set of feet and sell for crazy money.

To me, it's not worth the money but it's not snake oil product. It does reduce vibration and it's measurable.
 

Chrispy

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Feb 7, 2020
Messages
4,843
Likes
3,641
Location
PNW
Why are you skeptical? People have been trying different ways to reduce the cabinet vibration for a long time. While I cant say if there is any audible improvement, I am pretty sure many methods do reduce the vibration to a certain extent.

So what this company did is to package it into a nice looking set of feet and sell for crazy money.

To me, it's not worth the money but it's not snake oil product. It does reduce vibration and it's measurable.
I've used a variety of footings for my diy subs and found little to be concerned with, the gaia stuff may well depend on specific floor construction, hard to know from the info so far at least. There are other ways of isolating your speaker/sub from floor if needed....
 

Chrispy

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Feb 7, 2020
Messages
4,843
Likes
3,641
Location
PNW
Why are you skeptical? People have been trying different ways to reduce the cabinet vibration for a long time. While I cant say if there is any audible improvement, I am pretty sure many methods do reduce the vibration to a certain extent.

So what this company did is to package it into a nice looking set of feet and sell for crazy money.

To me, it's not worth the money but it's not snake oil product. It does reduce vibration and it's measurable.
Because it's not just cabinet, it seems it's more interaction with floor...which I don't have a particular issue with? I'd like to see more, but so far these vibration things on speakers have at least more than those promoting under solid state electronics or disc players....
 

Sined

Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2021
Messages
8
Likes
5
Location
Mont St-Hilaire, Canada
I had a bass problem from my DIY speakers, even if they measure well, the drivers are 10" (SEAS L26 ROY) which are technically capable of shaking everything in the house! One of the problems is that my listening room is in the basement, where 4 of the 6 surfaces are made of concrete, which we know does not vibrate much. It is normally a good thing, but like we used to say, too much of a good thing...

I asked Iso Acoustics if those feet could help to solve my particular problem: can a damping device be useful on a concrete floor? Like it was mentioned in the Audioholics review, they told me that, yes, it can help in preventing the vibration sent to the floor to get back out of phase to the speaker cabinet. As a DIYer, I don't pretend that I built dead cabinets, I know, they do vibrate a bit, I thought that this back wave cancelling explanation makes sense, so I decided to give it a try: Yep! That help to fix my problem, sorry, I don't have any measurement before and after, only subjective, but convincing! As a bonus, I also noticed the other more subtle improvements described by Audioholics . But don't take my words for granted, the effectiveness of this tweak may depend a lot on your actual speaker/listening room parameters.
 

MattHooper

Major Contributor
Joined
Jan 27, 2019
Messages
4,072
Likes
6,425
I've mentioned before I have the Isoacoustics pucks which I tried for turntable isolation. I wasn't able to measure (vibrometer app) or feel any difference in vibration transfer for my turntable platform. I tried 4 pucks under one of my speakers, and it changed the sound a bit, but I am not sure if that was merely from raising the speaker a bit relative to the other.

On the other hand the Townshend spring-based isolation footers worked wonders to reduce vibration both for the turntable platform and when placed under my speakers. Easily measurable for the turntable platform. For the speakers it was obvious too: without the springs standing beside speakers on the sprung wood floor, bass vibration was easy to feel coming through my feet. Also I normally feel the bass travelling through the floor vibrating under my ottomon and sofa when listening to bass heavy stuff. With the springs under the speakers the vibration was totally "gone" in terms of what I could feel. I actually ended up prefering the sound without the springs.
 

Thomas_A

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jun 20, 2019
Messages
2,139
Likes
1,497
Location
Sweden
There are quite a few threads about speaker feet. If you want the speakers to stand still while playing, spikes are not the first choice.
 

Sokel

Major Contributor
Joined
Sep 8, 2021
Messages
1,681
Likes
1,226
They seem to work and don't care about our skepticism as the measurements tell.
I think is something I would buy to give as a gift to a sub owner neighbor if I was living in an apartment :)
 

JeffS7444

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 21, 2019
Messages
1,970
Likes
2,882
The immediate question which comes to my mind is that this test was performed at just at 30 Hz + 5 kHz. But I wonder how the device performs at other frequencies?
 

sq225917

Major Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2019
Messages
1,236
Likes
1,354
The higher the frequency the stiffer they get, like any compliant mount.

There's no magic in them, sorbothane, squash balls, oil damped springs. They all do something at some frequency
 

izeek

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2020
Messages
324
Likes
169
Location
maryland
pretty sure they work well.
ive got 2 iso2000 substands that i can assure do a great job reducing vibration. even better after sitting the stands on a paver.
 

DJNX

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2022
Messages
48
Likes
34
These definitely work. But:

-How effective these are depends on how problematic your room is, when it comes exclusively to sympathetic resonances. They don't really help outside that particular issue.
-Bookshelves and towers benefit some (or very little), while a subwoofer is the best case use.
-There are equivalent solutions that don't even exceed a cost of $100.
 
Top Bottom