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For you MDs out there - Headphone triggering of BPPV event.. Possible? Likely?

Cahudson42

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#1
At 77, I have had a couple BPPV events. (Benign P? Positional Vertigo) . What is the likelihood these could be triggered by moderate SPL headphone listening? Loud SPL listening?

Thanks for your opinions!
 

Berwhale

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#2
My wife suffers from BPPV (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo) due some damage to her inner ear. She wears earphones and headphones frequently for music, pod casts and audio books and has never mentioned it as a trigger. YMMV
 

PaulD

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#3
I'm no otolaryngologist but a good friend is, and I have had similar events... From what I know the likelihood of such BPPV events being triggered by headphone use at moderate volume would be very low, at loud SPLs it may be considerably greater, you are the best judge of the triggers. I routinely listen over headphones with no ill effects, I do not often listen at rock & roll volume levels.

According to my friend the usual triggers are food sensitivities and lifestyle (stress etc). Typically there are sensitivities to specific spices, salts, alcohol and so on, so that some people cannot eat some foods, drink much and must maintain decent amounts of sleep and reduce stress to reduce the BPPV events.
 

PaulD

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#4
One more thing, keeping the sinuses clean can also help - there can be low levels of bacterial infection that can affect the inner ear. The best way to do this is a saline solution, sprayed into the nose 2-4 times a day (blow your nose afterwards). The solution is slightly alkaline and the bugs like an acidic environment so it makes the environment in the nose and sinuses a hostile environment for them. It can take 2+ weeks of daily treatment for this to make an effect. "Narium mist" is the name of the one I was recommended, but you can make your own refills (I'll put it below). I know someone who swears by this as being very effective, YMMV...

(Nasal spray refill - 1/2 teaspoon each of cooking salt and NaHCO3 (bicarbonate of soda / sodium bicrbonate) in 200 or so ml of water. Can increase the salt a little if it feels weak.)
 

Kal Rubinson

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#5
If you already have a history of BPPV, it would be a good idea to avoid really high SPL since the entire labyrinth (auditory and vestibular) is subjected to the same pressure changes. Also, as PaulD has suggested, keeping sinus passages clean will aid in venting such pressures.
 
OP
Cahudson42

Cahudson42

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Thread Starter #6
Thank you all for taking the time to respond and suggest. Greatly appreciated!

Finally, may I also ask if any of you have found the 'Epley' exercise helpful - or not?

Thanks again..
Chris
 
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