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Edifier S3000 Pro and the wireless connection between L/R

Schwa83

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I recently purchased the Edifier S3000 Pro. Connected to my DAC via XLR. One of the unique features of this set is there is no cable connecting left and right speaker. It's done via KleerNet, while the right speaker contains all the connections.

However, this has recently made me wonder --- Does this wireless sync between left and right --- limit the audio quality reproduction the speakers can achieve?

If I am using a streaming service such as Qobuz or Tidal, and listening to 24bit/192khz track -- can the speakers not reproduce that quality due to the wireless connection between left/right? I'm trying to find a solid answer as to whether this is a "bottleneck" so to speak.

Appreciate any insights to this!
 

RickSanchez

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It appears the S3000Pro speakers are "Hi-Res Certified" and support at least 24/96 kHz; it's not clear if they support 24/192 kHz. But that support is for both speakers and is not limited by the wireless connection between the L and R speakers. You may need to contact their Support team to get a definitive answer on 24/192 kHz.


Hi-Res Certified speakers, like the Edifier S3000Pro bookshelf speakers, are capable of processing digital audio sources at 96 kHz or higher and achieve deeper lows and brighter highs thanks to their astounding frequency response range of 38 hz to 40 kHz.
 

Katji

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hmm, I never thought of it, I suppose I sort of assumed.
...XMOS, DAC, ADC, DSP, Bluetooth support 192 kHz, but then...
kKP8Gj8.png


It seems weird, then, to limit the speakers as a whole, but I suppose the idea is to do all the processing at up to 192 kHz and then the usual 16/44.1 CD standard applies.

Edifier HO did respond quickly to email asking about the right XMOS device driver version, but if you're going to ask about this, I suggest cc Kleer.

[Note: Kleer mainly used in headphones, AKG and Sennheiser wireless headphones.]
 
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Schwa83

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hmm, I never thought of it, I suppose I sort of assumed.
...XMOS, DAC, ADC, DSP, Bluetooth support 192 kHz, but then...
kKP8Gj8.png


It seems weird, then, to limit the speakers as a whole, but I suppose the idea is to do all the processing at up to 192 kHz and then the usual 16/44.1 CD standard applies.

Edifier HO did respond quickly to email asking about the right XMOS device driver version, but if you're going to ask about this, I suggest cc Kleer.

[Note: Kleer mainly used in headphones, AKG and Sennheiser wireless headphones.]
I found a device document, and it appears that certain KleerNet chips can support higher than CD Quality.

The document is here: http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/en562499.pdf

It appears there are 5 different chips, with all but one supporting 16/24-bits, 48/96KHz. The one that doesn't is a USB device, so I imagine these Edifiers use one of the chips that can support up to 24-bits/96KHz. This makes me feel a bit better, but would still prefer the speakers to have no bottlenecks at all in regards to the quality they can handle.
 

poxymoron

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I recently purchased the Edifier S3000 Pro. Connected to my DAC via XLR. One of the unique features of this set is there is no cable connecting left and right speaker. It's done via KleerNet, while the right speaker contains all the connections.

However, this has recently made me wonder --- Does this wireless sync between left and right --- limit the audio quality reproduction the speakers can achieve?

If I am using a streaming service such as Qobuz or Tidal, and listening to 24bit/192khz track -- can the speakers not reproduce that quality due to the wireless connection between left/right? I'm trying to find a solid answer as to whether this is a "bottleneck" so to speak.

Appreciate any insights to this!
I've the same speakers and I had the same thoughts a while back however there seems to be more and more data that suggests that 96kHz/192kHz hi-res audio offers little or no objective improvement over 48kHz audio so I've stopped worrying about it. My incomming minidsp Flex downsamples hi-res to 48kHz when using Dirac Live so I'll not be getting any benefit if it is there. FYI, your Edifiers will use its built in ADC to convert the signal back to digital, then do its DSP internally, and then convert back to analogue using its own TI DAC so there's really no benefit in using an external DAC. The Edifier's internal DAC cannot be bypassed. Unless you're using your DAC for something else too. Thankfully I realised this before I spent €1000 on a RME ADI-2 DAC FS!
 

Katji

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I've the same speakers and I had the same thoughts a while back however there seems to be more and more data that suggests that 96kHz/192kHz hi-res audio offers little or no objective improvement over 48kHz audio so I've stopped worrying about it.
I don't like it, but there are better things to worry about / to be concerned about. "hi-res" is "not part of my world," I am not going to get music anywhere other than Soundcloud. (As long as Soundcloud continues, that is.)
My incomming minidsp Flex downsamples hi-res to 48kHz when using Dirac Live so I'll not be getting any benefit if it is there. FYI, your Edifiers will use its built in ADC to convert the signal back to digital, then do its DSP internally, and then convert back to analogue using its own TI DAC so there's really no benefit in using an external DAC. The Edifier's internal DAC cannot be bypassed. Unless you're using your DAC for something else too. Thankfully I realised this before I spent €1000 on a RME ADI-2 DAC FS!
I was looking at the Flex [digital version] as a way to integrate subwoofer/s...an expensive way because I would rather continue using EAPO. iow i just need something that Windows will see as 2x stereo channels [for EAPO]...continue with digital input to Edifier, high-pass, and analog or digital to subwoofer/s.
 
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Schwa83

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I've the same speakers and I had the same thoughts a while back however there seems to be more and more data that suggests that 96kHz/192kHz hi-res audio offers little or no objective improvement over 48kHz audio so I've stopped worrying about it. My incomming minidsp Flex downsamples hi-res to 48kHz when using Dirac Live so I'll not be getting any benefit if it is there. FYI, your Edifiers will use its built in ADC to convert the signal back to digital, then do its DSP internally, and then convert back to analogue using its own TI DAC so there's really no benefit in using an external DAC. The Edifier's internal DAC cannot be bypassed. Unless you're using your DAC for something else too. Thankfully I realised this before I spent €1000 on a RME ADI-2 DAC FS!
Regarding your comment "there's really no benefit to using an external DAC.", are you certain there is no benefit? I ask because when I switched from a creative sound card to an iFi Zen Dac V2 I noticed a pretty big difference in overall sound quality.
 

poxymoron

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Regarding your comment "there's really no benefit to using an external DAC.", are you certain there is no benefit? I ask because when I switched from a creative sound card to an iFi Zen Dac V2 I noticed a pretty big difference in overall sound quality.
You'll be limited by the worst performing DAC in the chain which I suspect would be the Edifier's internal DAC. Whether there's an audible difference is another matter. The point being that you can input digital straight to the speakers without the external DAC. If you go digital to analogue before the speaker, the speaker then has to do its own ADC and DAC conversion subsequently. With regards to the sound card vs iFi Zen DAC then the iFi would be far better than the sound card, with the signal perhaps not degraded much, if at all, by the speaker DAC thereafter. In that instance the sound card was the weakest link.
 
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Schwa83

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You'll be limited by the worst performing DAC in the chain which I suspect would be the Edifier's internal DAC. Whether there's an audible difference is another matter. The point being that you can input digital straight to the speakers without the external DAC. If you go digital to analogue before the speaker, the speaker then has to do its own ADC and DAC conversion subsequently. With regards to the sound card vs iFi Zen DAC then the iFi would be far better than the sound card, with the signal perhaps not degraded much, if at all, by the speaker DAC thereafter. In that instance the sound card was the weakest link.
Got it, thanks!
 

NewbieAudiophileExpert

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I can't really hear the difference between Spotify streams, 16/44.1Khz and higher , although i like the placebo effect of listening to apple music's 24/48-88-98-188-192khz tracks.
 
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