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Do speakers change all that much after 100 hours of 'burn-in'?

ezra_s

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#1
I just found this video of "The audiophiliac" and Andrew Jones explaining scientifically what this "break-in" thing is. Seems it is still out of the oven (just published)

 
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Fluffy

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#2
He should have talked about elastic limits at the beginning instead of using confusing terms like creep, but at least he did at the end. What I don't understand is how come the compliance of the spider change if they don't go past it's elastic limit, as he claims? And if they do go past it's limit a little bit, then why not using a material with a better elastic limit that won't change its compliance under normal usage?

Other than that confusing bit, it's nice to see him pretty much debunk the whole burn-in myth. There are some other points I wish he would address more directly. First of all, when he says the response change around the resonant frequency, by how much it changes? Is it even by a noticeable amount? And what does he think that people are hearing when they claim they hear a speaker break in over hours or sometimes weeks of playing it? And while the break-in happens primarily in the woofer, does a tweeter break-in also in the same fashion?

Part 2 should be interesting, at any case.
 

Haint

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#3
He should have talked about elastic limits at the beginning instead of using confusing terms like creep, but at least he did at the end. What I don't understand is how come the compliance of the spider change if they don't go past it's elastic limit, as he claims? And if they do go past it's limit a little bit, then why not using a material with a better elastic limit that won't change its compliance under normal usage?

Other than that confusing bit, it's nice to see him pretty much debunk the whole burn-in myth. There are some other points I wish he would address more directly. First of all, when he says the response change around the resonant frequency, by how much it changes? Is it even by a noticeable amount? And what does he think that people are hearing when they claim they hear a speaker break in over hours or sometimes weeks of playing it? And while the break-in happens primarily in the woofer, does a tweeter break-in also in the same fashion?

Part 2 should be interesting, at any case.
As I understood it, he's saying some of the resin bonds break down under normal range/use, not just when pushed past it's elastic limit.
 

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