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DIYSG Volt-8 Speaker Review

hardisj

Major Contributor
Reviewer
Joined
Jul 18, 2019
Messages
2,747
Likes
12,768
Location
North Alabama
As always, this is a copy/paste from my site and the format may not translate well here but I don't have time to shine it up so if you want to view it on my site, here is the link:
https://www.erinsaudiocorner.com/loudspeakers/diysg_volt8/

DIYSG Volt-8 (v2) Speaker Review
  • Wednesday, Jun 2, 2021
DSC01960.JPG

Foreword / YouTube Video Review
The review on this website is a brief overview and summary of the objective performance of this speaker. It is not intended to be a deep dive. Moreso, this is information for those who prefer “just the facts” and prefer to have the data without the filler. Due to extremely limited time, I am not providing any subjective evaluation but hope the data will be enough for designers and DIY’ers alike that they can glean useful information.

For a primer on what the data means, please watch my series of videos where I provide in-depth discussion and examples of how to read the graphics presented hereon.
https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLnIxFR_ey0b37Ex4KV2mBz-kYB7QLffR1


Information and Photos
The DIY Sound Group Volt-8 v2 is a DIY design from Matt Grant which is available in kit form from DIYSG. Here are some notes from the product page:
The Volt-8 uses a custom made 8” coaxial for high output and impressive power handling. The new surround and spider improves the X-max rating while the light weight cone gives this speaker a smooth sounding midrange even when played at high levels. The crossover was designed to give an even response that not only excels for surround speaker use, but also for great front speaker performance. The custom compression driver (tweeter) made by Celestion is installed on the back and fires through a small waveguide in the center of the woofer giving you point source sound and great off axis response. I’ll be posting more information about the custom driver soon. It’s based off the CDX1-1446. The crossover was designed to give an even response that not only excels for surround sound speaker use, but also for great front speaker performance. The Volt-8 does quite well in small ported enclosures between .5 and .7cuft when used with a subwoofer. The Atmos version is a small sealed enclosure designed to play down to 100hz, which is great for Atmos use. You can use them mounted in your ceiling without an enclosure for Atmos use if needed. For surround sound or mains, you should build the ported models.

These speakers were loaned to me by their owner, who built them from the kit.

DSC01958.JPG




CTA-2034 (SPINORAMA) and Accompanying Data
All data collected using Klippel’s Near-Field Scanner. The Near-Field-Scanner 3D (NFS) offers a fully automated acoustic measurement of direct sound radiated from the source under test. The radiated sound is determined in any desired distance and angle in the 3D space outside the scanning surface. Directivity, sound power, SPL response and many more key figures are obtained for any kind of loudspeaker and audio system in near field applications (e.g. studio monitors, mobile devices) as well as far field applications (e.g. professional audio systems). Utilizing a minimum of measurement points, a comprehensive data set is generated containing the loudspeaker’s high resolution, free field sound radiation in the near and far field. For a detailed explanation of how the NFS works and the science behind it, please watch the below discussion with designer Christian Bellmann:

The reference axis was at the tweeter.

Measurements are provided in a format in accordance with the Standard Method of Measurement for In-Home Loudspeakers (ANSI/CTA-2034-A R-2020). For more information, please see this link.

CTA-2034 / SPINORAMA:
CEA2034%20--%20DIYSG%20Volt-8.png


Early Reflections Breakout:
Early%20Reflections.png

Estimated In-Room Response:
Estimated%20In-Room%20Response.png

Horizontal Frequency Response (0° to ±90°):
SPL%20Horizontal.png

Vertical Frequency Response (0° to ±40°):
SPL%20Vertical.png

Horizontal Contour Plot (not normalized):
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Horizontal_Spectrogram_Full.png

Horizontal Contour Plot (normalized):
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20Beamwidth_Horizontal.png

Vertical Contour Plot (not normalized):
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Vertical_Spectrogram_Full.png

Vertical Contour Plot (normalized):
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20Beamwidth_Vertical.png



Additional Measurements

Impedance Magnitude and Phase + Equivalent Peak Dissipation Resistance (EPDR)

For those who do not know what EPDR is (ahem, me until 2020), Keith Howard came up with this metric which he defined in a 2007 article for Stereophile as:
… simply the resistive load that would give rise to the same peak device dissipation as the speaker itself.​
A note from Dr. Jack Oclee-Brown of Kef (who supplied the formula for calculating EPDR):
Just a note of caution that the EPDR derivation is based on a class-B output stage so it’s valid for typical class-AB amps but certainly not for class-A and probably has only marginal relevance for class-D amps (would love to hear from a class-D expert on this topic).​
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Impedance_0.1v.png
On-Axis Response Linearity
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20FR_Linearity.png
“Globe” Plots
These plots are generated from exporting the Klippel data to text files. I then process that data with my own MATLAB script to provide what you see. These are not part of any software packages and are unique to my tests.
Horizontal Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.
DIYSG%20Volt-8_360_Horizontal_Polar.png


Vertical Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.
DIYSG%20Volt-8_360_Vertical_Polar.png


Harmonic Distortion
Harmonic Distortion at 86dB @ 1m:
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20Harmonic%20Distortion%20%2886dB%20%40%201m%29.png

Harmonic Distortion at 96dB @ 1m:
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20Harmonic%20Distortion%20%2896dB%20%40%201m%29.png



Dynamic Range (Instantaneous Compression Test)
The below graphic indicates just how much SPL is lost (compression) or gained (enhancement; usually due to distortion) when the speaker is played at higher output volumes instantly via a 2.7 second logarithmic sine sweep referenced to 76dB at 1 meter. The signals are played consecutively without any additional stimulus applied. Then normalized against the 76dB result.
The tests are conducted in this fashion:
  1. 76dB at 1 meter (baseline; black)
  2. 86dB at 1 meter (red)
  3. 96dB at 1 meter (blue)
  4. 102dB at 1 meter (purple)
The purpose of this test is to illustrate how much (if at all) the output changes as a speaker’s components temperature increases (i.e., voice coils, crossover components) instantaneously.
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Compression.png

Long Term Compression Tests
The below graphics indicate how much SPL is lost or gained in the long-term as a speaker plays at the same output level for 2 minutes, in intervals. Each graphic represents a different SPL: 86dB and 96dB both at 1 meter.
The purpose of this test is to illustrate how much (if at all) the output changes as a speaker’s components temperature increases (i.e., voice coils, crossover components).
The tests are conducted in this fashion:
  1. “Cold” logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand)
  2. Multitone stimulus played at desired SPL/distance for 2 minutes; intended to represent music signal
  3. Interim logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand) (Red in graphic)
  4. Multitone stimulus played at desired SPL/distance for 2 minutes; intended to represent music signal
  5. Final logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand) (Blue in graphic)
The red and blue lines represent changes in the output compared to the initial “cold” test.
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Long_Term_86_Compression.png
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Long_Term_96_Compression.png


Parting / Random Thoughts
  • Response linearity is quite varied which indicates a sub-optimal coaxial design. Similar performance can be seen in the DIYSG Volt-6 I also reviewed (link). This is my quote from that review: The response linearity is pretty poor. If I am being honest, this just seems like a sub-par coaxial driver with poor tweeter/mid integration. I say that because the 6kHz region shows some sort of issue where the off-axis response is even higher in SPL than the on-axis response; something I typically see in waveguides and this is way above the crossover point. There are also pretty significant combing effects above this, especially above 10kHz.
  • Mean SPL is 89.4dB @ 2.83v/1m.
  • Impedance sweep indicates enclosure tuning of approximately 65Hz and shows some signs of resonance (source unknown) at approximately 500Hz and again at 700Hz.
  • Good distortion performance.
  • Poor dynamic range below about 150Hz where both compression and enhancement trade off below 100Hz.
  • Good long term compression with practically no change as listening duration continues (though, remember, this is not the same as instantaneous compression (dynamic range), mentioned above).
Support / Donate
If you like what you see here and want to help me keep it going, please consider donating via PayPal (link). Donations help me pay for new items to test, hardware, miscellaneous items and costs of the site’s server space and bandwidth. All of which I pay out of pocket. So, if you can help chip in a few bucks, know that it is very much appreciated and that the support means a lot to me.
 

Maiky76

Senior Member
Joined
May 28, 2020
Messages
318
Likes
2,358
Location
French, leaving in China
As always, this is a copy/paste from my site and the format may not translate well here but I don't have time to shine it up so if you want to view it on my site, here is the link:
https://www.erinsaudiocorner.com/loudspeakers/diysg_volt8/

DIYSG Volt-8 (v2) Speaker Review
  • Wednesday, Jun 2, 2021
DSC01960.JPG

Foreword / YouTube Video Review
The review on this website is a brief overview and summary of the objective performance of this speaker. It is not intended to be a deep dive. Moreso, this is information for those who prefer “just the facts” and prefer to have the data without the filler. Due to extremely limited time, I am not providing any subjective evaluation but hope the data will be enough for designers and DIY’ers alike that they can glean useful information.

For a primer on what the data means, please watch my series of videos where I provide in-depth discussion and examples of how to read the graphics presented hereon.
https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLnIxFR_ey0b37Ex4KV2mBz-kYB7QLffR1


Information and Photos
The DIY Sound Group Volt-8 v2 is a DIY design from Matt Grant which is available in kit form from DIYSG. Here are some notes from the product page:
The Volt-8 uses a custom made 8” coaxial for high output and impressive power handling. The new surround and spider improves the X-max rating while the light weight cone gives this speaker a smooth sounding midrange even when played at high levels. The crossover was designed to give an even response that not only excels for surround speaker use, but also for great front speaker performance. The custom compression driver (tweeter) made by Celestion is installed on the back and fires through a small waveguide in the center of the woofer giving you point source sound and great off axis response. I’ll be posting more information about the custom driver soon. It’s based off the CDX1-1446. The crossover was designed to give an even response that not only excels for surround sound speaker use, but also for great front speaker performance. The Volt-8 does quite well in small ported enclosures between .5 and .7cuft when used with a subwoofer. The Atmos version is a small sealed enclosure designed to play down to 100hz, which is great for Atmos use. You can use them mounted in your ceiling without an enclosure for Atmos use if needed. For surround sound or mains, you should build the ported models.

These speakers were loaned to me by their owner, who built them from the kit.

DSC01958.JPG





CTA-2034 (SPINORAMA) and Accompanying Data
All data collected using Klippel’s Near-Field Scanner. The Near-Field-Scanner 3D (NFS) offers a fully automated acoustic measurement of direct sound radiated from the source under test. The radiated sound is determined in any desired distance and angle in the 3D space outside the scanning surface. Directivity, sound power, SPL response and many more key figures are obtained for any kind of loudspeaker and audio system in near field applications (e.g. studio monitors, mobile devices) as well as far field applications (e.g. professional audio systems). Utilizing a minimum of measurement points, a comprehensive data set is generated containing the loudspeaker’s high resolution, free field sound radiation in the near and far field. For a detailed explanation of how the NFS works and the science behind it, please watch the below discussion with designer Christian Bellmann:

The reference axis was at the tweeter.

Measurements are provided in a format in accordance with the Standard Method of Measurement for In-Home Loudspeakers (ANSI/CTA-2034-A R-2020). For more information, please see this link.

CTA-2034 / SPINORAMA:
CEA2034%20--%20DIYSG%20Volt-8.png



Early Reflections Breakout:
Early%20Reflections.png


Estimated In-Room Response:
Estimated%20In-Room%20Response.png


Horizontal Frequency Response (0° to ±90°):
SPL%20Horizontal.png


Vertical Frequency Response (0° to ±40°):
SPL%20Vertical.png


Horizontal Contour Plot (not normalized):
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Horizontal_Spectrogram_Full.png


Horizontal Contour Plot (normalized):
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20Beamwidth_Horizontal.png


Vertical Contour Plot (not normalized):
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Vertical_Spectrogram_Full.png


Vertical Contour Plot (normalized):
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20Beamwidth_Vertical.png




Additional Measurements

Impedance Magnitude and Phase + Equivalent Peak Dissipation Resistance (EPDR)

For those who do not know what EPDR is (ahem, me until 2020), Keith Howard came up with this metric which he defined in a 2007 article for Stereophile as:
… simply the resistive load that would give rise to the same peak device dissipation as the speaker itself.​
A note from Dr. Jack Oclee-Brown of Kef (who supplied the formula for calculating EPDR):
Just a note of caution that the EPDR derivation is based on a class-B output stage so it’s valid for typical class-AB amps but certainly not for class-A and probably has only marginal relevance for class-D amps (would love to hear from a class-D expert on this topic).​
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Impedance_0.1v.png

On-Axis Response Linearity
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20FR_Linearity.png

“Globe” Plots
These plots are generated from exporting the Klippel data to text files. I then process that data with my own MATLAB script to provide what you see. These are not part of any software packages and are unique to my tests.
Horizontal Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.
DIYSG%20Volt-8_360_Horizontal_Polar.png



Vertical Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.
DIYSG%20Volt-8_360_Vertical_Polar.png



Harmonic Distortion
Harmonic Distortion at 86dB @ 1m:
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20Harmonic%20Distortion%20%2886dB%20%40%201m%29.png


Harmonic Distortion at 96dB @ 1m:
DIYSG%20Volt-8%20Harmonic%20Distortion%20%2896dB%20%40%201m%29.png




Dynamic Range (Instantaneous Compression Test)
The below graphic indicates just how much SPL is lost (compression) or gained (enhancement; usually due to distortion) when the speaker is played at higher output volumes instantly via a 2.7 second logarithmic sine sweep referenced to 76dB at 1 meter. The signals are played consecutively without any additional stimulus applied. Then normalized against the 76dB result.
The tests are conducted in this fashion:
  1. 76dB at 1 meter (baseline; black)
  2. 86dB at 1 meter (red)
  3. 96dB at 1 meter (blue)
  4. 102dB at 1 meter (purple)
The purpose of this test is to illustrate how much (if at all) the output changes as a speaker’s components temperature increases (i.e., voice coils, crossover components) instantaneously.
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Compression.png


Long Term Compression Tests
The below graphics indicate how much SPL is lost or gained in the long-term as a speaker plays at the same output level for 2 minutes, in intervals. Each graphic represents a different SPL: 86dB and 96dB both at 1 meter.
The purpose of this test is to illustrate how much (if at all) the output changes as a speaker’s components temperature increases (i.e., voice coils, crossover components).
The tests are conducted in this fashion:
  1. “Cold” logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand)
  2. Multitone stimulus played at desired SPL/distance for 2 minutes; intended to represent music signal
  3. Interim logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand) (Red in graphic)
  4. Multitone stimulus played at desired SPL/distance for 2 minutes; intended to represent music signal
  5. Final logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand) (Blue in graphic)
The red and blue lines represent changes in the output compared to the initial “cold” test.
DIYSG%20Volt-8_Long_Term_86_Compression.png

DIYSG%20Volt-8_Long_Term_96_Compression.png



Parting / Random Thoughts
  • Response linearity is quite varied which indicates a sub-optimal coaxial design. Similar performance can be seen in the DIYSG Volt-6 I also reviewed (link). This is my quote from that review: The response linearity is pretty poor. If I am being honest, this just seems like a sub-par coaxial driver with poor tweeter/mid integration. I say that because the 6kHz region shows some sort of issue where the off-axis response is even higher in SPL than the on-axis response; something I typically see in waveguides and this is way above the crossover point. There are also pretty significant combing effects above this, especially above 10kHz.
  • Mean SPL is 89.4dB @ 2.83v/1m.
  • Impedance sweep indicates enclosure tuning of approximately 65Hz and shows some signs of resonance (source unknown) at approximately 500Hz and again at 700Hz.
  • Good distortion performance.
  • Poor dynamic range below about 150Hz where both compression and enhancement trade off below 100Hz.
  • Good long term compression with practically no change as listening duration continues (though, remember, this is not the same as instantaneous compression (dynamic range), mentioned above).
Support / Donate
If you like what you see here and want to help me keep it going, please consider donating via PayPal (link). Donations help me pay for new items to test, hardware, miscellaneous items and costs of the site’s server space and bandwidth. All of which I pay out of pocket. So, if you can help chip in a few bucks, know that it is very much appreciated and that the support means a lot to me.

Hi,

Here is my take on the EQ.

The raw data with corrected ER and PIR:

Score no EQ: 2.1
With Sub: 4.8

Spinorama with no EQ:
  • Poor
DIYSG Volt-8 No EQ Spinorama.png

Directivity:
Poor
DIYSG Volt-8 2D surface Directivity Contour Only Data.png

DIYSG Volt-8 LW Better data.png

EQ design:
I have generated two EQs. The APO config files are attached.
  • The first one, labelled, LW is targeted at making the LW flat
  • The second, labelled Score, starts with the first one and adds the score as an optimization variable.
Score EQ LW: 3.2
with sub: 5.9

Score EQ Score: 3.9
with sub: 6.6

Code:
DIYSG Volt-8 APO EQ LW 96000Hz
June032021-120433

Preamp: -3.1 dB

Filter 1: ON HPQ Fc 76.9 Hz Gain 0 dB Q 1.19
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 201.3 Hz Gain -2.8 dB Q 1.29
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 775 Hz Gain -4 dB Q 3.74
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 1111 Hz Gain 2.24 dB Q 2.82
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 1738 Hz Gain -2.81 dB Q 4.25
Filter 6: ON PK Fc 2555 Hz Gain 3.26 dB Q 3.31

DIYSG Volt-8 APO EQ Score 96000Hz
June032021-115845

Preamp: -2.3 dB

Filter 1: ON HPQ Fc 76.9 Hz Gain 0 dB Q 1.19
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 201.3 Hz Gain -2.8 dB Q 1.11
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 809 Hz Gain -4 dB Q 3
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 1036 Hz Gain 2.74 dB Q 3.92
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 1774 Hz Gain -3.05 dB Q 3.25
Filter 6: ON PK Fc 2550 Hz Gain 2.9 dB Q 2.31
Filter 7: ON PK Fc 6400 Hz Gain -3 dB Q 1.83
DIYSG Volt-8 EQ Design.png


Spinorama EQ LW
DIYSG Volt-8 LW EQ Spinorama.png


Spinorama EQ Score
DIYSG Volt-8 Score EQ Spinorama.png


Zoom PIR-LW-ON
DIYSG Volt-8 Zoom.png


Regression - Tonal
DIYSG Volt-8 Regression - Tonal.png


Radar no EQ vs EQ score
DIYSG Volt-8 Radar.png


The rest of the plots is attached.
 

Attachments

  • DIYSG Volt-8 APO EQ LW 96000Hz.txt
    346 bytes · Views: 41
  • DIYSG Volt-8 APO EQ Score 96000Hz.txt
    390 bytes · Views: 34
  • DIYSG Volt-8 2D surface Directivity Contour Data.png
    DIYSG Volt-8 2D surface Directivity Contour Data.png
    286.3 KB · Views: 24
  • DIYSG Volt-8 3D surface Vertical Directivity Data.png
    DIYSG Volt-8 3D surface Vertical Directivity Data.png
    450.6 KB · Views: 18
  • DIYSG Volt-8 3D surface Horizontal Directivity Data.png
    DIYSG Volt-8 3D surface Horizontal Directivity Data.png
    444.4 KB · Views: 20
  • DIYSG Volt-8 Normalized Directivity data.png
    DIYSG Volt-8 Normalized Directivity data.png
    526.1 KB · Views: 17
  • DIYSG Volt-8 Raw Directivity data.png
    DIYSG Volt-8 Raw Directivity data.png
    888.3 KB · Views: 25
  • DIYSG Volt-8 Reflexion data.png
    DIYSG Volt-8 Reflexion data.png
    290.4 KB · Views: 19
  • DIYSG Volt-8 LW data.png
    DIYSG Volt-8 LW data.png
    293.6 KB · Views: 16

pierre

Addicted to Fun and Learning
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 1, 2017
Messages
662
Likes
1,536
Location
Switzerland
Another possible EQ that optimise the Olive score from 2.2 to 3.6.

filters0.png
filters1.png
filters2.png


Code:
EQ for DIYSG Volt-8 v2 computed from ErinsAudioCorner data
Preference Score 2.2 with EQ 3.6
Generated from http://github.com/pierreaubert/spinorama/generate_peqs.py v0.8
Dated: 2021-06-03-06:42:08

Preamp: -2.7 dB

Filter  1: ON PK Fc  5548 Hz Gain -2.40 dB Q 1.12
Filter  2: ON PK Fc  5313 Hz Gain +2.07 dB Q 4.00
Filter  3: ON PK Fc   763 Hz Gain -2.36 dB Q 4.00
Filter  4: ON PK Fc   439 Hz Gain +1.58 dB Q 3.14
Filter  5: ON PK Fc  1078 Hz Gain +1.99 dB Q 4.00
Filter  6: ON PK Fc  2678 Hz Gain +2.69 dB Q 4.00
Filter  7: ON PK Fc  1700 Hz Gain -3.32 dB Q 4.00
Filter  8: ON PK Fc 10138 Hz Gain -2.60 dB Q 2.65
Filter  9: ON PK Fc  4351 Hz Gain -1.43 dB Q 4.00
Filter 10: ON PK Fc  1415 Hz Gain +1.49 dB Q 4.00
Filter 11: ON PK Fc   807 Hz Gain -1.03 dB Q 4.00
Filter 12: ON PK Fc  2375 Hz Gain +1.58 dB Q 4.00
Filter 13: ON PK Fc  2185 Hz Gain -1.00 dB Q 4.00
 

Nomad

Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2021
Messages
23
Likes
17
Thanks for taking your time to measure these DIY speakers! So far the DIYSG speakers have not made a very good impression it seems.
 

XpanD

Active Member
Forum Donor
Joined
Apr 7, 2018
Messages
107
Likes
103
Location
Netherlands
Ouch, was hoping for something a little better here. The price isn't entirely terrible, but that seems to be about the only good thing on offer here.

Unrelated... The "CTA-2034 (SPINORAMA) and Accompanying Data" YouTube link does not seem to allow embedding on other sites, I just see a "Playback on other websites has been disabled by the video owner." error. May be good to change that to a normal link?

Thanks for another quality measurement.
 

yourmando

Active Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2020
Messages
133
Likes
162
Yes, thanks for the quality measurements.

Looks like the Volts should not have been released.

Any new speaker maker these days should be willing to proudly display a quality CTA-2034 measurement on their spec page. To not even know that it measures this way, or to know but release anyway are both not great. There are incumbent brands that can get away with Klippel murder (ahem, Klipsch). For better or worse, they benefit from decades of brand building.

Given that Diysg has constant inventory problems, it would seem to make sense to slim their product offerings down. They owner has lamented many times how difficult it is to keep every little part in stock for so many skus.

Sliming the products down to the best and most popular (HTM-12 v2, etc) + raising prices to allow for better service and quality control should go a long way. (For example, should catch when speaker vendor quaility deviates from design.) From that base, it would make sense to add more models.
 

Ericglo

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
364
Likes
263
I said you would either be loved or hated over at AVS. Your thread got them stirred up. :)

Now all you need is that youtuber and his girlfriend to come over and say "See I told you measurements didn't matter":eek:


Yes, thanks for the quality measurements.

Looks like the Volts should not have been released.

Any new speaker maker these days should be willing to proudly display a quality CTA-2034 measurement on their spec page. To not even know that it measures this way, or to know but release anyway are both not great. There are incumbent brands that can get away with Klippel murder (ahem, Klipsch). For better or worse, they benefit from decades of brand building.

Given that Diysg has constant inventory problems, it would seem to make sense to slim their product offerings down. They owner has lamented many times how difficult it is to keep every little part in stock for so many skus.

Sliming the products down to the best and most popular (HTM-12 v2, etc) + raising prices to allow for better service and quality control should go a long way. (For example, should catch when speaker vendor quaility deviates from design.) From that base, it would make sense to add more models.

To his credit, Matt has said that they didn't measure that well. They seemed to sell well anyway.

I mentioned to the owner a couple of years ago that he should reduce the amount of speakers he has for sale. I forgot exactly what he said, but it was along the lines that he offers what sells.
 
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