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Denon AVR-X4800H AVR Review

Rate this AVR

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 10 3.0%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 72 21.6%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 179 53.6%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 73 21.9%

  • Total voters
    334
New member here, but as a result of the generous sharing of excellent information by knowledgeable members on this thread, (thank you!!!!) I have purchased the 4800H. I have totally enjoyed setting up and listening to this receiver. My previous receiver was a Yamaha RX-A2020 circa 2012. My question is getting simple 2 channel Audio Out to feed my modest Yamaha Cassette Deck (KX-400U). Seems like someone asked a similar question and received an answer, but I can’t seem to find it again. (Probably poor search effort on my part). Should be a way to get Audio out. Can not find it in the manual either.

I route everything through the receiver...Roku, Fire Stick, Blu-ray (Oppo 103) and my Windows10 PC via HDMI only. Running 5.1.4 output system so all speaker terminals are used. 1 of the 3 HDMI outs (the middle one) feeds video to my old 60 inch Samsung TV (UN60f7100). There are a sufficient number of Audio inputs which I have successfully configured to accept my analog Turntable Preamp, CD player (Sony CDP-C7ESD), and Yamaha Cassette Deck. No issue there. I have tried Zone 2 (Crutchfield Tech Support) (but I think this should be for connecting an amp) but anyway …powering Zone 2 on, screen indicates the correct source that I am using (right now, TUNER), enabled all speakers by selecting the option button on remote then all speakers then start.

Thanks for your suggestions!
 
My question is getting simple 2 channel Audio Out to feed my modest Yamaha Cassette Deck (KX-400U).
There are no dedicated fixed-level line outs like older stereo receivers and pre-amps had. However, you can set the Zone 2/3 output to fixed instead of variable:

1717722906228.png


You will want to disable Audyssey on that feed and set the volume to 0 dB (or maybe a few dB less to provide additional protection from overload). Be careful if you switch Zone 2 to some other output as it will be full reference volume :)
 
There are no dedicated fixed-level line outs like older stereo receivers and pre-amps had. However, you can set the Zone 2/3 output to fixed instead of variable:

View attachment 373589

You will want to disable Audyssey on that feed and set the volume to 0 dB (or maybe a few dB less to provide additional protection from overload). Be careful if you switch Zone 2 to some other output as it will be full reference volume :)
Thank you for the detailed response! These screen shots are a great help.
 
Probably you happened to hit one of those maximum power transformer inrush current. It could reach 12X, or higher, like over 100 A, for less than 0.1 second, and could occur if you turn it on when the incoming (from the outlet) voltage sine wave is at 0 V and the worst case could be if there are still remanence magnetic flux in the transformer core that just happened to be in the polarity that results in even higher inrush current. Such remanence flux could be significant enough to encourage such higher maximum that is enough to make that kind of "springy" sound, if the unit has been turned off not too long ago. Better designed power supply would have some sort of start up inrush current limiting, but I guess not mid range AVRs.
Thanks for the detailed explanation @peng. Is this something to be concerned about that may damage my receiver? Such as an unstable current from my power source or issue with the power board? I'm using one of those surge protector power boards.
 
There are many complaints here about HDMI CEC. The implementation of the protocol by equipment makers is probably fine, but the user interface is lacking: the naming of the properies and their description is confusing and obscure, so it is hard for the end user to configure CEC correctly. Having said that, after experimenting for a couple of days and reading the manuals, I was able to get my HT setup to work flawlessly using only AppleTV remote. My setup consists of Sony universal player ubp-800x, Apple TV 4K 3rd gen, Denon avr-x4800h, and Sony X950H TV. (I excluded the Sony player from CEC control since we don’t use it often.) I'm sure it's helpful that my components are pretty recent - implementations of CEC are getting better compatibility wise.

One more thing: my 6ft long high speed HDMI cables with Ethernet are working without issues. No need to buy Ultra Fast cables.
 
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I'm running an LG OLED C3 TV, 4800, Roku 4k Stick, Google Chromecast 4K, and CEC in full force with no issues. Knock on wood.
 
The Denon and other Japanese brands of AVR have very high audio resolution, which allows them to maintain a high price.
However, the fact is that such high resolution is useless, as they are usually equipped with a mini transformer, resulting in a pathetically low amplifier power. They can only drive small desktop speakers, and are completely useless for floor standing multi-channel speakers, with huge distortion.

This means that this so-called high level is useless and is only used to sell at a high price.


On the other hand, some huge beasts have very high power and can drive large speakers very well, but their resolution and separation are very poor.

Therefore, don't waste your money investing in Japanese AVRs. Save your money and buy truly high-resolution, high-power AVRs instead.
 
This one is for standby :)
In fact, due to the size and weight, the Japanese AVR can not have a high power output.

Some high-power multi-channel amplifiers are big MAC, and the power supply has dozens of kilograms.

We see that Class D amplifiers are small in size and high in efficiency, but they are rarely seen in AVR, and most of them are used by cheap AVR.

Really need more manufacturers to be able to develop multi-channel amplifiers, now there are a lot of high-efficiency AVP, but the amplifier is still very large.
 
In fact, due to the size and weight, the Japanese AVR can not have a high power output.

Some high-power multi-channel amplifiers are big MAC, and the power supply has dozens of kilograms.

We see that Class D amplifiers are small in size and high in efficiency, but they are rarely seen in AVR, and most of them are used by cheap AVR.

Really need more manufacturers to be able to develop multi-channel amplifiers, now there are a lot of high-efficiency AVP, but the amplifier is still very large.

Therefore, don't waste your money investing in Japanese AVRs. Save your money and buy truly high-resolution, high-power AVRs instead.

I wouldn't generalize, because it depends on the application. In one of my 2 channel system, sitting from 3 meters, using 85 dB/2.83V/m sensitivity speakers, my newly acquired tiny feather weigh Denon AVR has no trouble delivering the SPL I need, with this new tiny AVR, I have no need to pair it with my also tiny 300/500 W 8/4 ohm Hypex based class D amp, or my previous heavy weight Parasound Hao A21, or Bryston 4B SST, but since I still have the Hypex amp, I left it connected but I would sell it without any reservation.

The bottom line is, obviously in some applications, "high power" amps are absolutely necessary, but in many applications, even the likes of the match box sized class D amps such as the Fosi V3 would be more than adequate.
 
They can only drive small desktop speakers, and are completely useless for floor standing multi-channel speakers, with huge distortion.

False.

Sequels.jpg
 
The Denon and other Japanese brands of AVR have very high audio resolution, which allows them to maintain a high price.
However, the fact is that such high resolution is useless, as they are usually equipped with a mini transformer, resulting in a pathetically low amplifier power. They can only drive small desktop speakers, and are completely useless for floor standing multi-channel speakers, with huge distortion.
This means that this so-called high level is useless and is only used to sell at a high price.
On the other hand, some huge beasts have very high power and can drive large speakers very well, but their resolution and separation are very poor.
Therefore, don't waste your money investing in Japanese AVRs. Save your money and buy truly high-resolution, high-power AVRs instead.

In fact, due to the size and weight, the Japanese AVR can not have a high power output.
Some high-power multi-channel amplifiers are big MAC, and the power supply has dozens of kilograms.
We see that Class D amplifiers are small in size and high in efficiency, but they are rarely seen in AVR, and most of them are used by cheap AVR.
Really need more manufacturers to be able to develop multi-channel amplifiers, now there are a lot of high-efficiency AVP, but the amplifier is still very large.

How does that make you feel?
 
I wouldn't generalize, because it depends on the application. In one of my 2 channel system, sitting from 3 meters, using 85 dB/2.83V/m sensitivity speakers, my newly acquired tiny feather weigh Denon AVR has no trouble delivering the SPL I need, with this new tiny AVR, I have no need to pair it with my also tiny 300/500 W 8/4 ohm Hypex based class D amp, or my previous heavy weight Parasound Hao A21, or Bryston 4B SST, but since I still have the Hypex amp, I left it connected but I would sell it without any reservation.

The bottom line is, obviously in some applications, "high power" amps are absolutely necessary, but in many applications, even the likes of the match box sized class D amps such as the Fosi V3 would be more than adequate.
For stereo, a small Class D amplifier is definitely enough. I also have several Class D amplifiers, but for multichannel amplifiers, most of them are huge. Obviously there is no very efficient multi-channel class D amplifier products, many cheap class D amplifier AVR, product quality is very poor, power is also imaginary.
 
In fact, the FOSI V3 can also drive such floor speakers, and I can't deny that it is perfectly fine for stereo sound.

But for multi-channel, you might need 8 FOSI V3 modules, 8 individual power supplies, and you can imagine how big 8 power supplies can be.

The transformer of the Japanese AVR is poor, and it can certainly make a sound, but the effect is very poor!
 
I would just go for a JBL MA9100HP or wait for the NAD T799.
Both are class-d devices with Dirac Live.
The T799 will probably even get DLART next year.
 
The transformer of the Japanese AVR is poor, and it can certainly make a sound, but the effect is very poor!

This is ASR, not AOR. Please provide your data/measurements to support your claims regarding poor sound on multichannel setups. In the meantime I went with actual X4800H test data from this and other test sites before purchase, which have proved valid and the product does indeed meet my use case (providing a quite decent 5.4.4 experience).

And BTW there are Japanese AVR's you can barely lift due to transformer weight, if that's actually the criteria you use to judge amp quality/capability. Why all the picking on Japanese AVR's? Poor performance in AVR's is not limited to that country.
 
In fact, the FOSI V3 can also drive such floor speakers, and I can't deny that it is perfectly fine for stereo sound.
But for multi-channel, you might need 8 FOSI V3 modules, 8 individual power supplies, and you can imagine how big 8 power supplies can be.
If power supply space is a problem with (8) Fosi's, using (8) individual PS's is the wrong design choice. Might try (4) of their 48V/10A supplies.
 
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