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Dayton Audio OPAL1 speaker launches

Yeah, right, OK.

200W continuous 'RMS' into any speaker is ridiculous, letalone some little pissant two way sh#tbag bookshelf speakers...

yes, but does not state continuous. :)

Since you like traditional amplifiers so much, did you look at the AP report for their new A400 amp?

https://www.parts-express.com/Themes/Default/images/PDP/300-3848/A400 AudioPrecision Reports

My initial skim did not motivate me to run out and buy, but have no experience with AP reports.
 
They say this:

With an RMS power handling of 200 watts, they can achieve output capability beyond most bookshelf speakers of this size.

RMS is the calulation to determine the equivalent constant DC current that would disipate the same rated AC power. The key word is constant.

This is Scanspeaks (excerpt) of a document (technical note 02) on rated power handling with IEC 268-5 ratings:

1716602340298.png


1716602278151.png


Dayton is specifying RMS, which is the top one. 100Hrs with continuous signal...

Here is the back panel of my old Jamo 507a speakers.
IMG_3252.jpg


Note the Long Term and Short Term as per IEC 268-5. They are a speaker with 2x165mm woofers, 2x100mm mids and a 25mm tweeter. A lot of VCs to get rid of heat and they don't even specify an RMS figure as we know it would be ~100W so.

The 200W RMS figure for this little PE two way is fantasy, no two ways about it.
 
Do you think the little 5-1/4" Purifi PTT5.25X04-NFA-01 has a real IEC 250W power handling like its data sheet says?
 
I'm happy that generally speakers get too loud before anything runs out of power. No stress about blowing up amps or drivers!

Also I wonder about supposed RMS rating for any speaker. The cooling ability of a speaker driver varies with frequency let alone its ability to even handle excursion at such ratings as frequency drops. As frequency increases cooling decreases due to less movement.

In other words, get speakers to handle the job with safety factor. You push it to the edge constantly it's going to fail sooner.
 
They say this:

With an RMS power handling of 200 watts, they can achieve output capability beyond most bookshelf speakers of this size.

RMS is the calulation to determine the equivalent constant DC current that would disipate the same rated AC power. The key word is constant.

This is Scanspeaks (excerpt) of a document (technical note 02) on rated power handling with IEC 268-5 ratings:

View attachment 371128

View attachment 371127

Dayton is specifying RMS, which is the top one. 100Hrs with continuous signal...

Here is the back panel of my old Jamo 507a speakers.
View attachment 371130

Note the Long Term and Short Term as per IEC 268-5. They are a speaker with 2x165mm woofers, 2x100mm mids and a 25mm tweeter. A lot of VCs to get rid of heat and they don't even specify an RMS figure as we know it would be ~100W so.

The 200W RMS figure for this little PE two way is fantasy, no two ways about it.
Very, very good sir!!
 
They say this:

With an RMS power handling of 200 watts, they can achieve output capability beyond most bookshelf speakers of this size.

RMS is the calulation to determine the equivalent constant DC current that would disipate the same rated AC power. The key word is constant.

This is Scanspeaks (excerpt) of a document (technical note 02) on rated power handling with IEC 268-5 ratings:

Dayton is specifying RMS, which is the top one. 100Hrs with continuous signal...

Here is the back panel of my old Jamo 507a speakers.

Note the Long Term and Short Term as per IEC 268-5. They are a speaker with 2x165mm woofers, 2x100mm mids and a 25mm tweeter. A lot of VCs to get rid of heat and they don't even specify an RMS figure as we know it would be ~100W so.

The 200W RMS figure for this little PE two way is fantasy, no two ways about it.

Dayton Audio and GRS are both Parts Express speakers. According to the PE site there are approx. 340 Dayton Audio or GRS speakers manufactured. I'm not saying you are wrong, but do you have anything other than a pic of a back panel of a speaker that is not related to the one under consideration, to suggest PE/Dayton Audio does not know how to measure speakers?
 

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Dayton Audio and GRS are both Parts Express speakers. According to the PE site there are approx. 340 Dayton Audio or GRS speakers manufactured. I'm not saying you are wrong, but do you have anything other than a pic of a back panel of a speaker that is not related to the one under consideration, to suggest PE/Dayton Audio does not know how to measure speakers?

I don't think you realise how much heat is produced, nor have you ever measured 200W of continuous disipation in any electronic device. We are talking about a small, floating voice coil of copper wire, not thermally coupled to anything and another even smaller voice coil (tweeter), perhaps trying to sink 10% of that (20W).

It's just not going to happen. The numbers are utter fantasy.
 
I don't think you realise how much heat is produced, nor have you ever measured 200W of continuous disipation in any electronic device. We are talking about a small, floating voice coil of copper wire, not thermally coupled to anything and another even smaller voice coil (tweeter), perhaps trying to sink 10% of that (20W).

It's just not going to happen. The numbers are utter fantasy.

I think you are forgetting that a lot of the speaker driver's power goes to constantly changing the energy state of the moving mass. I asked ChatGPT to calculate this, so I don't know how correct this is...

According to this sheet, https://www.daytonaudio.com/images/resources/295-102--epique-e150he-44-spec-sheet.pdf, the speaker has about 83.3dB 1W/1M. At 200W input, this driver has about 1.5mm travel at 1kHz. Moving a 26.6gram mass at 1kHz in a sinusoidal motion 1.5mm, which is tied to the center point of travel with a spring that has a compliance of 0.6mm/N, takes 86 Watts. And these calculations are in a vacuum. Some additional work is done on the air. Again, I don't know how correct this is, but the point is that a not-insignificant amount of power is converted to mechanical energy and not dissipated as heat in the voice coil.
 
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