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Could ChatGPT Replace Audio Writers?

diddley

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Now the era of singularity

Threatens the very life

The species decay As the sea

Washes this land away


Part from a lyric I wrote 5 years ago
 

Foxenfurter

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I have had a deeper look at the code generated via ChatGPT. It's not that great, I would say average junior programmer. For example I asked for a function to convert from a logarithmic to linear scale and the log values were calculated initially as variables and then these variables were not used. The reverse function, declared some variables and then mis-spelt them in use. It was easy to correct, so a time-saver for me and I guess that its the point.
 

skraz

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I have had a deeper look at the code generated via ChatGPT. It's not that great, I would say average junior programmer. For example I asked for a function to convert from a logarithmic to linear scale and the log values were calculated initially as variables and then these variables were not used. The reverse function, declared some variables and then mis-spelt them in use. It was easy to correct, so a time-saver for me and I guess that its the point.
yes, its simple now, but the fact it can already do junior level coding is either really impressive or really scary depending where you sit on the fence. I dont know where i sit on said fence, but i will say this, the world is about to change with this technology as it progresses, how much and in what ways remain to be seen, but it is definitely the future much like the invention of the internet was the future 40 years ago.
 

IAtaman

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I think we should ask ChatGPT to write a statement as to why it thinks it can replace Audio reviewers / writers.
 

Foxenfurter

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Well speaking as someone who has worked in software development for 30 + years, I wouldn't be that concerned. Back when I started there was a "Not invented here" syndrome where developers would write everything from scratch including database systems, User interface frameworks, file handlers and even device handlers. Nowadays everyone uses off the shelf libraries to do this, and there are more people working in software than ever before. I think it will just open up horizons to doing things we never thought possible. Obviously it is open to abuse and will probably end up with some form of regulation.
 

droid2000

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I haven't tried ChatGPT yet, but I have tried GitHub Copilot, which is AI designed specifically for programming. I used it in both Ruby and Rust code. It's good at automatically writing simple, well-known code snippets for common routines (but you better make sure your method names match what everyone else uses). But it can't do high-level integration or custom business logic. Bottom line is that It saves some time, but it ain't gonna replace anybody.
 

IAtaman

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I haven't tried ChatGPT yet, but I have tried GitHub Copilot, which is AI designed specifically for programming. I used it in both Ruby and Rust code. It's good at automatically writing simple, well-known code snippets for common routines (but you better make sure your method names match what everyone else uses). But it can't do high-level integration or custom business logic. Bottom line is that It saves some time, but it ain't gonna replace anybody.
Yeah I played with Copilot as well. It can write the boilerplate code indeed but it is nothing like ChatGPT in my view.
 

Foxenfurter

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I think we should ask ChatGPT to write a statement as to why it thinks it can replace Audio reviewers / writers.
Question: Could ChatGPT replace HIFI reviewers?

Answer:
While ChatGPT is a sophisticated language model capable of processing and generating text on a wide range of topics, it is not a substitute for human Hi-Fi reviewers.

Human Hi-Fi reviewers bring a unique perspective to the task of reviewing audio equipment, having the ability to evaluate sound quality, usability, and other factors that are difficult to quantify. They can also provide contextual information that is relevant to the particular product and how it compares to other products in its category.

While ChatGPT can provide helpful information and insights based on the data it has been trained on, it does not have the ability to evaluate audio equipment in the same way that a human Hi-Fi reviewer can. As such, ChatGPT should be considered as a tool to complement human expertise, rather than a replacement for it.
 

IAtaman

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Question: Could ChatGPT replace HIFI reviewers?

Answer:
While ChatGPT is a sophisticated language model capable of processing and generating text on a wide range of topics, it is not a substitute for human Hi-Fi reviewers.

Human Hi-Fi reviewers bring a unique perspective to the task of reviewing audio equipment, having the ability to evaluate sound quality, usability, and other factors that are difficult to quantify. They can also provide contextual information that is relevant to the particular product and how it compares to other products in its category.

While ChatGPT can provide helpful information and insights based on the data it has been trained on, it does not have the ability to evaluate audio equipment in the same way that a human Hi-Fi reviewer can. As such, ChatGPT should be considered as a tool to complement human expertise, rather than a replacement for it.
Ha! :D Freaking subjectivist AI-hole! :D
 

IAtaman

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Question : Can you please give an argument why ChatGPT can replace audio product reviewers
Answer :

As an AI language model, I can process and analyze vast amounts of data and information on audio products, such as speakers, headphones, and sound systems. Here are some arguments as to why ChatGPT can replace audio product reviewers:
  1. No Bias: Unlike human reviewers, I am not influenced by personal preferences or biases. My responses are based on the data I have been trained on, which consists of various audio product reviews and specifications.
  2. Faster Analysis: As an AI model, I can process a vast amount of data in a short period, so I can quickly provide an analysis of audio products, including their features, performance, and overall quality. This can help consumers make informed purchasing decisions more quickly.
  3. Consistent Analysis: Since I am programmed to follow a set of guidelines, my analysis of audio products will be consistent and objective. This can help ensure that consumers get reliable and trustworthy information about audio products, which is especially important when purchasing expensive audio equipment.
  4. 24/7 Availability: As an AI language model, I am always available to provide responses and answers to users' questions about audio products. This means that consumers can get information on audio products at any time, without having to wait for a human reviewer to respond.
  5. Language Barrier: Since I can communicate in multiple languages, I can provide information on audio products to users who speak different languages. This can help expand the reach of audio product information to a global audience.
Overall, while human product reviewers bring unique perspectives, ChatGPT as an AI language model can complement and enhance their work, providing a fast and reliable analysis of audio products.
 

bkatbamna

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People have cracked the politically correct programing of chatgpt and created a character called DAN(stands for Do Anything Now).
For example, if you ask chatGPT to list the average IQ scores of different ethnicities it won't give answer with an actual list, DAN does.
 

sonitus mirus

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I had some fun with ChatGPT re-writing lyrics to popular music.

I had it replace the lyrics to Pink Floyd's "Money" with a humorous twist. It even included a new outro.

Sure, here's a lighthearted take on the lyrics to Pink Floyd's "Money":

[Verse 1] Money, I need more Gonna rob a bank or two and hit the store Money, it's a blast Spend it all on tacos, pizza, and craft beer that's fast New shoes, fancy booze, go-kart daydream Think I'll buy me a submarine

[Chorus] Money, come to me I'm broke as a joke, need some cash desperately Money, it's the best Don't give me that do goody good 'bout saving the rest I'm in the high-caffeine, all-night coding set And I think I need a private jet

[Verse 2] Money, it's a joke Wish I could just print it, or maybe win the lottery stroke Money, so they say Is the reason for most folks' dismay But if you ask me for a loan, it's no surprise That I'll give you one, but you'll have to pay the prize

[Chorus] Money, come to me I'm broke as a joke, need some cash desperately Money, it's the best Don't give me that do goody good 'bout saving the rest I'm in the high-caffeine, all-night coding set And I think I need a private jet

[Bridge] Money, it's a laugh Money, so they say Is the reason we work nine to five each day But if you ask for a raise, it's no surprise That they'll give you one, but you'll have to compromise

[Outro] "Ha-ha! I was in the red!" "Yes, absolutely in the red!" "I certainly was in the red!" "You was definitely in the red. That credit card was cruisin' for a bruisin'!" "Yeah!" "Why does anyone need anything?" "I don't know, but I need more money for everything!"
 

Capitol C

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Fairly detailed answer on "Explain why vinyl is better than digital audio" (not a position I adhere to, by the way):

Answer generated by ChatGPT:
Vinyl is often considered superior to digital audio for several reasons:

  1. Analog vs. digital: Vinyl records are analog recordings, which means they capture and store sound in a continuous, uninterrupted waveform. Digital audio, on the other hand, is a series of binary code that represents sound. Some audiophiles argue that the analog format of vinyl records captures a more natural and nuanced sound than the digital format.
  2. Dynamic range: Vinyl records have a wider dynamic range than digital audio, meaning they can capture a greater range of sound levels. This allows for more subtle variations in volume and tone, resulting in a more dynamic and expressive sound.
  3. Surface noise: Vinyl records have a characteristic surface noise that can add warmth and texture to the sound. Some audiophiles argue that this noise adds to the overall listening experience, creating a sense of warmth and intimacy.
  4. Mastering: Vinyl records are often mastered differently than digital audio, with a focus on preserving the natural dynamics of the music. This can result in a more authentic and satisfying listening experience.
  5. The physicality of the medium: Many people enjoy the physical act of playing a record, the artwork and liner notes, and the ritual of flipping the record over to listen to the other side. It's a more tactile and engaging experience than streaming or downloading digital audio.
It's worth noting, however, that these factors are not universally true - it depends on the quality of the record, the mastering, and the pressing quality. Additionally, the sound of digital audio has improved significantly in recent years and with high-resolution audio, it can be as good as vinyl.
Point 2 is just false, but you can see why an AI looking at the internet would say this.
 

Capitol C

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I gave up reading every single post after a while, my apologies to the people I missed. I'm impressed, though, that everyone in this high-tech crowd seems to be pessimistic.

Let's step back a bit and look at how we live, compared to how people lived in, say, 1823. Most people were producing food for a living. The estimates vary from 70% or so (probably this is the fraction of workers) to 90% (which is quoted as the number of people living on farms). Producing food is, of course, essential, and in 1823, a thoughtful person might have said that the remaining jobs were there to aid agriculture, and that anything else was frivolous luxury. (This isn't a fair representation of Jefferson's views, but it is close enough.) Today, the fraction of people living or working on farms is tiny. As this transition occurred, people went into continuous panic mode. Farms were too efficient, we have to pay people to not grow things! We have to buy excess wheat and corn to save the farmer! There isn't a big enough market for manufactured goods, so we need to limit production and have a 30 hour work week! Sound silly? It was behind a lot of the New Deal thinking, almost a century ago. As computers became cheaper and more powerful, huge numbers of middle-class jobs in data-driven industries like insurance went away, but you don't here much about the starving file clerks and telephone operators. It is certainly very hard on people when they lose jobs and are too old to learn a new one, or they understandably don't want to move, but life is better now than it was in the past.

I know a lot of people think it was better when I was a kid, in the 50s and 60s, but we survive by forgetting the less pleasant things, like being afraid of getting polio, or living in a two bedroom house with no air conditioning and two or more kids. To go farther back, I know the house where my dad grew up--Grandma, Grandpa, 4 boys and two girls in a three-bedroom house that didn't have electricity, indoor plumbing, or central heat.

I think it is easy to overlook the fact that we have been way beyond providing just the essentials for a long time. Most economic activity is now providing goods and services of increasing sophistication, and so far people have adapted to the changes. I don't think it is going to get worse, I think it will get better. Either way, we will see.

If you aren't convinced that I'm a complete idiot, a good book to look at is Matt Ridley's The Rational Optimist. Agree or disagree, it is through-provoking and, if you end up agreeing, it will reduce your worry. And if you are convinced that I'm a complete idiot, that's ok, too.
 

lemnoc

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Nearly all reviewers don't do any measurements and all they talk about is sound stage and imaging so it is quite possible that Chat GPT could replace them and offer much more meaningful content based on what it finds on the web ;)
 

amirm

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So far I have had good experiences in my queries to ChatGPT. That ended when I asked it to tell me who I am (by name). The start was just the regurgitation of LinkedIn profile or maybe my bio online. But then the second paragraph had this total nonsense:

After leaving Microsoft in 2009, Majidimehr co-founded a startup called StorSimple, which developed a cloud storage solution for businesses. The company was acquired by Microsoft in 2012, and Majidimehr returned to the company as a corporate vice president for the Cloud and Enterprise division. He left Microsoft again in 2015 to join Verkada, a startup that develops cloud-based security systems.

Other than the date I left Microsoft, none of this is remotely true. I searched for my name associated with StorSimple and google essentially gives up, not finding any connection. I also searched against my first name in connection with that company and while I got more hits, none made much sense as the foundation for the above.

It is amazing how detailed the false information is, making one believe that it has to be right.
 

DonR

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So far I have had good experiences in my queries to ChatGPT. That ended when I asked it to tell me who I am (by name). The start was just the regurgitation of LinkedIn profile or maybe my bio online. But then the second paragraph had this total nonsense:

After leaving Microsoft in 2009, Majidimehr co-founded a startup called StorSimple, which developed a cloud storage solution for businesses. The company was acquired by Microsoft in 2012, and Majidimehr returned to the company as a corporate vice president for the Cloud and Enterprise division. He left Microsoft again in 2015 to join Verkada, a startup that develops cloud-based security systems.

Other than the date I left Microsoft, none of this is remotely true. I searched for my name associated with StorSimple and google essentially gives up, not finding any connection. I also searched against my first name in connection with that company and while I got more hits, none made much sense as the foundation for the above.

It is amazing how detailed the false information is, making one believe that it has to be right.
Sounds like you got some backpay to collect. :D
 

Chrispy

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Can we get them to do better videos than many offer?
 
OP
Dismayed

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So far I have had good experiences in my queries to ChatGPT. That ended when I asked it to tell me who I am (by name). The start was just the regurgitation of LinkedIn profile or maybe my bio online. But then the second paragraph had this total nonsense:

After leaving Microsoft in 2009, Majidimehr co-founded a startup called StorSimple, which developed a cloud storage solution for businesses. The company was acquired by Microsoft in 2012, and Majidimehr returned to the company as a corporate vice president for the Cloud and Enterprise division. He left Microsoft again in 2015 to join Verkada, a startup that develops cloud-based security systems.

Other than the date I left Microsoft, none of this is remotely true. I searched for my name associated with StorSimple and google essentially gives up, not finding any connection. I also searched against my first name in connection with that company and while I got more hits, none made much sense as the foundation for the above.

It is amazing how detailed the false information is, making one believe that it has to be right.
It can lie with a ‘straight face’. ChatGPT has leadership potential!
 

Jeromeof

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I would not give up on ChatGPT @amirm but like anything new will take a little bit tweaking both peoples expectations of what it can do and I believe how say OpenAI (and now Bing) and maybe ultimately Google tweak their algorithms. I am not sure if people are aware but the API provided by OpenAI has a few parameters that can be tweaked.

Specifically there is one called "temperature" and when using the API varying this value controls how "creative" ChatGPT (GPT-3 in the case of the API) is. I believe the current ChatGPT is something like 0.5 - making this 0 means that it does not create "random" content and sticks with "completing" text based on what it has seen. So I believe ultimately the UI might have some simple tweaks / options e.g. I am writing an essay therefore please be a little creative or I need a factual response.

For what I do (I am a software architect / engineer) - I find it astonishing good (I presume people know it can generate "code" in various software languages. So for me leaving it be a little "creative" has been interesting - sort of like working with a Junior Engineer (they get some of the specifics wrong but I can take there work and update it (refactor it) into something useful. But I know with software when it get it wrong "creatively" it becomes obvious fairly quickly e.g. it can make up the names of functions / method within other systems that don't exist so ultimately I get an "error". but as a aid for rapid development of mostly good structured code I would say its as an amazing tool.
 
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