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Blind test - objectivists with tin hearing?

Soniclife

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I have one main problem. My audio rig is used in the family area. And we are constantly switching inputs and sources. The only time the same input would be used would be when I'm using only one specific source. So it would be hard for me not to know.
I get that, this sort of test is often hard to do in the real world. How about the following test that might make you challenge yourself on how good long term acoustic memory is.

Do the classic mp3 vs flac test with a software tool that gives instant switching, e.g. foobar, use headphones or speakers, whatever works for you, use the highest mp3 bitrate you can pass the test with. When you are comfortable with this move on to the next stage.

Foobar offers 4 buttons to press to work out what is what, A, B, X & Y. For the next stage before you press any of them mute, press the button then un-mute. You can do this 3 button press as fast as you like. Can you still pass the test?

For the next stage leave mute on for 60 seconds across the switch. Can you still pass the test?

The beauty of this test is you know no cheating is going on as you are in total control of it, and you know an audible difference that you can determine blind exists, and continues to exist through the test, the only thing that changes is the long term memory part.
 

garbulky

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I get that, this sort of test is often hard to do in the real world. How about the following test that might make you challenge yourself on how good long term acoustic memory is.

Do the classic mp3 vs flac test with a software tool that gives instant switching, e.g. foobar, use headphones or speakers, whatever works for you, use the highest mp3 bitrate you can pass the test with. When you are comfortable with this move on to the next stage.

Foobar offers 4 buttons to press to work out what is what, A, B, X & Y. For the next stage before you press any of them mute, press the button then un-mute. You can do this 3 button press as fast as you like. Can you still pass the test?

For the next stage leave mute on for 60 seconds across the switch. Can you still pass the test?

The beauty of this test is you know no cheating is going on as you are in total control of it, and you know an audible difference that you can determine blind exists, and continues to exist through the test, the only thing that changes is the long term memory part.
I probably can’t pass that test. I think I tried that once and it was a sighted comparison and I still couldn’t pass it
 

andreasmaaan

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I probably can’t pass that test. I think I tried that once and it was a sighted comparison and I still couldn’t pass it
I've also struggled depending on the MP3 bitrate and the program.

If you're interested, you could try with a lower bitrate - just low enough that you can detect the difference with fast switching.
 

Soniclife

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I probably can’t pass that test. I think I tried that once and it was a sighted comparison and I still couldn’t pass it
That's why I said to choose the highest bitrate that you can pass it with, so that you start from a known passable test.
 
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The experiment shows that those objectivist listeners have clearly chosen the right approach for themselves in evaluating gear:)
 

Killingbeans

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Why? Does the experiment reflect an approach that 'objectevists' are certain to use when evaluating gear? Because I dont see it, sorry.

All I see is that confirmation bias is a bitch, no matter if you're an 'objectivist' or a 'subjectivist'.
 

j_j

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I wonder - does this mean we can't comprehend everything we hear? Something must be focusing what parts of the sound we take away our impressions of.
I know this is an old thread, but for odd reasons I stumbled on this, and that is PRECISELY what happens, and it's your own cognitive processes that vary the focusing.
 

Cosmik

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I know this is an old thread, but for odd reasons I stumbled on this, and that is PRECISELY what happens, and it's your own cognitive processes that vary the focusing.
So what does that mean for listening tests? 'Cognitive processes' suggests something objective; the brain responding to its surroundings. As though as long as the immediate environment is controlled, the listening test is happening on a level playing field. But surely people bring with them their own imaginations and memories. If half the panel had just heard about Kennedy's assassination on the car radio and half had not, would that not spoil the test no matter how rigorous the conditions in the room were?
 

j_j

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So what does that mean for listening tests? 'Cognitive processes' suggests something objective; the brain responding to its surroundings. As though as long as the immediate environment is controlled, the listening test is happening on a level playing field. But surely people bring with them their own imaginations and memories. If half the panel had just heard about Kennedy's assassination on the car radio and half had not, wouldn't that spoil the test no matter how rigorous the conditions in the room were?

Of course, that's why positive and negative controls are necessary. You always have to know if the subject is "broken" so to speak. In the case you mention mostly one would see distraction, and failure to notice positive controls.

What such things are not likely to do is change absolute sensitivities, except to completely eliminate them if the individual is uncomfortable.
 
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