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Bike Advice

Snarfie

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#41
Buying new i would suggest at least decent set of gears (Front an back), breaks an cranck (pedals) from one brand.
One of the best qualities for years of cycle fun are Shimano 105, Ultegra an Dura Ace. Between the 3 from a quality point of view there are no big difference besides weight.
So a 105 set will do fine an is sold brand new including frame ready to go for a round 1000,- euro or less. A Ultegra around a 1100,- an more. In special deals a 105 could go for around 700,- euro mostly older models but brand new.
You have than an light aluminum frame. The difference between a modern alu frame an carbon is not that big/inaudible:facepalm: for novice/average cyclists.
But a carbon frame is at least twice as expensive an could break easily if you have a minor accident. So if you don't want to take part of the Touré de France or other pro competitions a alu frame is fine.
 
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#42
I got myself a cyclo cross bike last year to add to my old pub bike and hard-tail. Changed the saddle as Cannondale was a killer. Really love being able to go pretty much anywhere and unless you want a more sedate ride or are looking to specialise I can really recommend one. In the UK it is almost impossible to get any half decent new bikes under 1000 GBP and second hand prices seem inflated.

We also have an indoor exercise bike as it is better for hanging clothes off. Seriously though my wife didn't want a bike on rollers in the house so I bought a DKN bike (not sure if it is available in the states) and got about 30% off with a discount code. I can recommend them because we have had the bike for about 6 years and used it reasonably regularly. We also had a couple of problems with the bike and they were dealt with promptly. I would look for bikes with at least a blue tooth connection as even on this old thing you can hook it up to an app and this gives you more options for tackling the monotony. Or you can do what my wife does and just watch TV.

As suggested you might get a better deal buying second hand particularly if you have the space. Good luck
 
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#43
Buying new i would suggest at least decent set of gears (Front an back), breaks an cranck (pedals) from one brand.
One of the best qualities for years of cycle fun are Shimano 105, Ultegra an Dura Ace. Between the 3 from a quality point of view there are no big difference besides weight.
So a 105 set will do fine an is sold brand new including frame ready to go for a round 1000,- euro or less. A Ultegra around a 1100,- an more. In special deals a 105 could go for around 700,- euro mostly older models but brand new.
Buying new i would suggest at least decent set of gears (Front an back), breaks an cranck (pedals) from one brand.
One of the best qualities for years of cycle fun are Shimano 105, Ultegra an Dura Ace. Between the 3 from a quality point of view there are no big difference besides weight.
So a 105 set will do fine an is sold brand new including frame ready to go for a round 1000,- euro or less. A Ultegra around a 1100,- an more. In special deals a 105 could go for around 700,- euro mostly older models but brand new.
You have than an light aluminum frame. The difference between a modern alu frame an carbon is not that big/inaudible:facepalm: for novice/average cyclists.
But a carbon frame is at least twice as expensive an could break easily if you have a minor accident. So if you don't want to take part of the Touré de France or other pro competitions a alu frame is fine.
if you don't want to take part of the Touré de France or other pro competitions a alu frame is fine.
I was hit by a car, There was. only scratches on my Kestral Talon carbon frame. It did better than I.
 

Snarfie

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#44
I was hit by a car, There was. only scratches on my Kestral Talon carbon frame. It did better than I.
Then you were lucky (probably not head on) if you hit a wall even not that hard the change that a alu will survive is beter than a carbone frame (will more easily shatter) other metal frames can even bend what that will do with the balance of the bike is another story. I also have a Stevens Xenon carbon frame an have fallen a few times only some carvings.
 

dasdoing

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#45
Another turbo training indoor cyclist here. The worst thing about indoor cycling is that it is lethally boring. Silly as it may sound, I often watch old TdF or Giro stages on YouTube while pedalling. Another thing is that it is sometimes difficult to get comfortable on the bike. A saddle which is perfectly ok in summer becomes a torture device when cycling indoors during winter.
my butt would always hurt until I got a ISM split nose saddle. this is a solution for agressive positions though. I never felt my butt again
 

MRC01

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#46
... One of the best qualities for years of cycle fun are Shimano 105, Ultegra an Dura Ace. Between the 3 from a quality point of view there are no big difference besides weight.
...
The difference between a modern alu frame an carbon is not that big/inaudible:facepalm: for novice/average cyclists.
But a carbon frame is at least twice as expensive an could break easily if you have a minor accident. So if you don't want to take part of the Touré de France or other pro competitions a alu frame is fine.
That's generally true, and I resemble that. My primary road bike is a '99 Trek 2200 with Shimano 105. I've put about 15,000 miles on it over the years and the only thing I've had to replace is the tires, brake pads, chain & sprockets. The headset, bottom bracket, wheel bearings, brakes, derailleurs are all OEM and work like new. Even now it's like a new bike: smooth, quiet, fast and responsive. Sure I'm a mechanic and it's very well maintained, but it still speaks well of the quality & durability of the parts. I've been waiting for it to break so I can get a new bike, but that still hasn't happened...

One area I disagree: there is more to the frame than weight. Aluminum is inherently soft so the frames use oversize tubing to attain the necessary strength, which makes them quite rigid. This sacrifices comfort and road feel. Carbon frames have the best of both worlds: lighter than aluminum with the excellent comfort and road feel of steel. On my Al frame Trek, I use a suspension seatpost that I wouldn't need with a carbon frame. My next road bike will have a carbon frame, but at the rate my current bike is going it might be another 20 years before I get it...
 

PierreV

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#47
The correct number of bikes to own is always N+1 (with N being the number of bikes you currently own).
And, unsurprisingly, the differences between bikes are much more noticeable than the differences between amps or dacs.

Going back to indoor biking, the main points are imho

1) full adjustability Kickr / Watt bike style and component compatibility for the saddle which is the most likely thing you will want to fine-tune.
2) heavy flywheel and smooth operation
3) good build quality

Now, riding indoors may be incredibly boring but I solved that side of the equation by putting one of the indoor trainers at the sweet spot of the main hifi (WAF or PAF could be a factor there) and by recycling an old 55" TV and home theater in the gym room. I bought what was then (around 2005) the "top of the line " kettler and I have now clocked 80000 km on it.

IMG_20210128_195605.jpg


It works just as it did initially and the only wear and tear is metal fatigue at the pedals. They started to appear after 60000KM, so that's OK with me

IMG_20210128_195519.jpg


I think there is some inflation in the current feature sets and pricing of the most recent home trainers, part of it because it has become some kind of fashion item, part of it because of the subscription model and the technical bells and whistles they feel cool to add but will feel like and look like cheap tablets three years down the road...
 

MRC01

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#48
The correct number of bikes to own is always N+1 (with N being the number of bikes you currently own). ...
True, but getting married stopped the progression. I had 7 "bikes" (quotes used because one was a unicyle) when I got married. Now I still have 7, 5 of which are those same ones from 21 years ago.
On the brighter side, one of them is a wonderful Santana road tandem that she doesn't want me to get rid of... It's so much faster than a road bike and twice as fun. Anyone who hasn't ridden a good road tandem is missing a lot of fun.
 
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#49
Then you were lucky (probably not head on) if you hit a wall even not that hard the change that aluminum will survive is better than a carbon frame (will more easily shatter) other metal frames can even bend what that will do with the balance of the bike is another story. I also have a Stevens Xenon carbon frame an have fallen a few times only some carvings.
It was not head on. Thank God. But it was flush. I knew what to do I rolled with it. Flipped the bike and landed on a small grassy island just barely big enough to break my fall. Three days in hospital.
 
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#50
That's generally true, and I resemble that. My primary road bike is a '99 Trek 2200 with Shimano 105. I've put about 15,000 miles on it over the years and the only thing I've had to replace is the tires, brake pads, chain & sprockets. The headset, bottom bracket, wheel bearings, brakes, derailleurs are all OEM and work like new. Even now it's like a new bike: smooth, quiet, fast and responsive. Sure I'm a mechanic and it's very well maintained, but it still speaks well of the quality & durability of the parts. I've been waiting for it to break so I can get a new bike, but that still hasn't happened...

One area I disagree: there is more to the frame than weight. Aluminum is inherently soft so the frames use oversize tubing to attain the necessary strength, which makes them quite rigid. This sacrifices comfort and road feel. Carbon frames have the best of both worlds: lighter than aluminum with the excellent comfort and road feel of steel. On my Al frame Trek, I use a suspension seatpost that I wouldn't need with a carbon frame. My next road bike will have a carbon frame, but at the rate my current bike is going it might be another 20 years before I get it...
Shimano 105. is excellent. Coupled with the fact that it is almost free if offered as OEM makes a it a natural choice for even the better carbon frames.
 

Dialectic

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#52
Reviews of these are littered with paid shills.
So true. I bought a Rogue Echo Bike last March, having read that this bike was bombproof, indestructible, etc.

After 10 months of use, there's significant belt noise (not as bad as a K-car on a cold morning, for example, but still annoying), and I can't get assistance from Rogue's reportedly good customer service department.
___

I am not able to recommend any recumbent bike (I just don't know about them), but please, please, whatever else you do, do not get a Peloton.
 
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#53
"....Please, whatever else you do, do not get a Peloton." Not that I have a dog in that fight, but would you care to elaborate?
 

Dialectic

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#54
"....Please, whatever else you do, do not get a Peloton." Not that I have a dog in that fight, but would you care to elaborate?
If we set aside cultural factors and the nature of the Peloton streamed classes (reportedly "cultish"), Pelotons are very expensive devices and, because they incorporate Android touchscreens with a limited update lifespan, are disposable. They are the most expensive bikes with built-in apps/touchscreens, and the build quality does not appear commensurate with the price.

My preference would be to get a bombproof bike and, if I needed the motivation of a class, use a smartphone or ipad to watch a free one on YouTube.
 
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#55
Well you loss me at "cultish" and '"most expensive" Personally I enjoy the solitude of cycling I understand those who seek the company and motivation of others. i frequently rode in groups also. There is nothing like the feel of a finely tuned machine and that often comes at a price. Earlier in this thread someone else suggested a cheaper alternative to the Peloton. I try to keep in mind that what is expensive to me .may be pocket change to others.
Choice of bike is a personal one. I see no reason to disqualify the Peloton.
 

Snarfie

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#58
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Snarfie

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#60
pro-teams have to use their sponsors material though. using what they use isn't automaticly a garantee you use the best, and even less that it is the best option for you
So you consider campagnolo as the best also in a time trail. I'ts well known that from a quality point of view these days their are no big diffrences between the 2 brands except for the high priced campagnolo's.
 
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