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Bike Advice

Sal1950

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#21

MRC01

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#23
... I like the bike with trainer as everything I do to my bike has benefits on the trainer. Seat, seat height, handlebars and position, clip pedals and biking shoes.
With the bike tuned/fitted to you your ready to get outside once the weather gets nice. And that's the best riding.
That's an important point. Training for big rides, I find that almost half the work is toughening up my @$$ (more specifically, the hip sit bones) so I can sit in the saddle for 5+ hours per day without pain & bruising. So a winter training must have the same seat and config as my actual bike.
 

Blumlein 88

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#25
I think the OP was not really looking to go biking outdoors. He wanted a comfortable good quality piece of indoor exercise gear hence the recumbent configuration. I'm may have lead the thread astray mentioning how good bikes are cheaper than good indoor bikes. My apologies.
 

Willem

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#26
I think the OP was not really looking to go biking outdoors
I admit that I also forgot about this. At the same time, depending on the climate, riding in Winter is not impossible. I went out for a ride today for some shopping. There was some snow, and the temperature was just above freezing, and that is by no means prohibitive. For lower temperatures and more snow than this an old mountainbike with snow tyres would be better than my nice classic town bike with 32 mm tyres (you don't want to use a nice bike on salted roads). Fit a pair of wide Continental Topcontact Winter II winter tyres and you are all set for anything short of really nasty winter weather. These tyres use car winter tyre technology (and not spikes) and are a revelation. The 50 mm wide size on an old mountainbike with fenders is a great combination.
 

paddycrow

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#27
Have you considered a rowing machine? I like that it involves more muscle groups in a workout.

Edit to add: I see someone beat me to it on pg 1!
 

Willem

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#28
I have, and it is still an option, but they are not cheap (not even the Decathlon ones), and even so not quite like the real rowing experience. But yes, you train more muscle groups. For me, the beauty of a bike trainer is of course that I can train precisely the muscle groups that I will need for cycling.:)
 

paddycrow

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#29
I have a Concept 2 rower, it was pretty reasonable. Current pricing is $900 for Model D, $1100 for Model E. I really like how easily it breaks down and stores upright.
 

JohnnyHonda

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#30
When my knees decided that they had enough jogging, I moved to a recumbent Schwinn bike. Not high tech, just simple operation and smooth flywheel at a reasonable price. My first one was crushed by the moving company so, I’ve had two models, both were around $400. I’ve been happy with both and I ride it about 5 times a week for the past 14 years. Measures speed, caloric output, heartrate but most importantly, its easy to use and get a good workout. Get one where you don’t have to step over a crossbar, makes it much easier to get on and off. Just an inexpensive, yet effective exercise tool.
 

Blumlein 88

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#33
When my knees decided that they had enough jogging, I moved to a recumbent Schwinn bike. Not high tech, just simple operation and smooth flywheel at a reasonable price. My first one was crushed by the moving company so, I’ve had two models, both were around $400. I’ve been happy with both and I ride it about 5 times a week for the past 14 years. Measures speed, caloric output, heartrate but most importantly, its easy to use and get a good workout. Get one where you don’t have to step over a crossbar, makes it much easier to get on and off. Just an inexpensive, yet effective exercise tool.
This is the one I had in mind that might be okay for around $400. Not the greatest feeling one, but it does work and not seem to fall apart.
 

Sal1950

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#34

Phorize

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#36
Since the house arrest lockdown, I haven't been able to go to the gym as before. So waifu and I are looking to buy a (recumbent) exercise bike. I see them on-line with prices ranging from less than two hundred dollars, to two thousand. I just want something that is decent and going to last, and not fall apart. McIntosh quality for Topping prices. I don't need blue meters, or anything like that. LOL

Since I know that ASR members are all physically (and mentally) fit, I'm asking advice. Anyone have any suggestions on decent quality but not through the roof priced home exercise gear?
I have one word for you:

Kettlebell
 
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#37
Heart monitor v work load

I always used a heart monitor. The theory being you should be working in the range of 60%-*0% of your max heartrate((220-your age). This is necessary to make sure you are actually benefitting from your workout.
The trend is going to power output. How many watts you are putting out. This is probably better for the advance rider.
Using a bicycle with a trainer does provide one advantage. Automatic resistance adjustment. The faster you pedal and the bigger the gear the greater the resistance.
Using the heart monitor you can actually warm up and dial in your target heart rate. Very beneficial if have you have cardiovascular problems
Warning!
I f you are transitioning from a sedentary life style to exercise get a physical first.;)
 

Leporello

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#39
That's an important point. Training for big rides, I find that almost half the work is toughening up my @$$ (more specifically, the hip sit bones) so I can sit in the saddle for 5+ hours per day without pain & bruising. So a winter training must have the same seat and config as my actual bike.
Another turbo training indoor cyclist here. The worst thing about indoor cycling is that it is lethally boring. Silly as it may sound, I often watch old TdF or Giro stages on YouTube while pedalling. Another thing is that it is sometimes difficult to get comfortable on the bike. A saddle which is perfectly ok in summer becomes a torture device when cycling indoors during winter.
 
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#40
You don' t need equipment. Jumping jacks, push ups, sit ups, squats, lunges, running in place are better. The 7 Minute workout APP is awesome! I admit I own a pair of dumb bells.
 
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