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Beyerdynamic DT770 Pro X Limited Edition Review

Dunring

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I just got a pair of the new DT770 Pro X headphones and here's a quick summary until measurements are done. I purchased this preview version myself, so no conflict of interest if you buy one or not.
More photos attached to the post, so it doesn't clutter things up. I've had every Beyerdynamic model for my business, so have a good perspective having had the chance to use over 300 different headphones and IEMs. Lacking test equipment, I'll give lots of comparisons to popular models. In a nutshell, these sound the most like the Truthear Zero Red but with 2db-3db recessed mids around 600hz and a fairly aggressive treble climb up to where snare drums hit and female vocalists go into higher ranges. Vocals and acoustic instruments like violins don't have the same lush/full sound like they do on the Truthear Zero Blue version, Sennheiser HD600/650, or Thieaudio Ghost, which is as nice as the Sennheiser HD650/6XX at a much better price.

To test them, I used:
SMSL DO400
Topping D10b + SMSL Drop HO150x
Moto G Power phone with and without Apple 3.5mm to USB adapter
16 bit 44.1khz FLAC
Destiny 2
I test everything in it since the sounds are so familiar after years of playing, and just keep a solo player clan for getting engrams each week.
Fightmare#2666 Club Engram Clan ID: 6424964

The Moto G Power did get them loud enough at max volume, but they sounded really good as long as you don't need headroom to equalize or party level volumes. With the Apple adapter it was unlimited volume and sounded terrific with FLAC files. On the DO400 and the temporary stack I pulled out they got better, but not night and day better. These really can do well with less power as long as your source files are good (i.e. lossless). I just ran in Windows exclusive mode for each test on the PC. My advice is just get a $9 Apple adapter on these. You won't need more power than that, even if you equalize with a preamp reduction. The main worry is their power handling is 210mw which is 1/5th of it's older brothers, so be really careful not to leave an amplifier in high gain mode or they might go up in a puff of smoke.

Imaging is excellent on these, as good as the Sennheiser IE600, in Destiny 2 I could instantly identify an enemy behind me. If anyone asks for a closed back gaming headphone, this is my new recommendation. Soundstage is on the money, not fake big or too small, just like the DT770 or MMX300. The only downside for gaming is the dip in the male vocal range is where footsteps can happen also, so a 3db boost at 600hz might be needed if you yearn to hear the pitter patter of little enemy feet in all situations.

For music, the bass is present and extends way down, but doesn't bleed into the mids or sound overly boosted. It's there if the song calls for it, but the DT770 250 ohm still pounds with more authority than these do in the bass department. For those bass obsessed, just get the Artti T10 and you'll be bouncing in your chair to hip hop songs. These aren't going to make you vibrate out of your chair like a hovercraft from the bass response.

Mids are a mixed bag. Male vocals are recessed and somewhat distant, with a hollow sound at times, not sure if it's the ear cup resonance or the kind of pre/post ringing in the 32 ohm DT770 with those drivers. It'll take measurements by someone with the equipment to analyze it. On the DT770 250 ohm it's not present though. Female vocals are good except when singers like Ellie Goulding or Sia go into their higher ranges and then it's higher/louder than they usually sound. It's not shouty or sibilant, but on the edge of too bright/thin at times. Amy Lee from Evanescence and Adele weren't as affected. If you value vocals and stringed instruments like violin, cello, etc. you'll be a lot happier with the Thieaudio Ghost for less money, or the Sennheiser HD650/600 for more (or used for the same price).

Treble: It's a Beyerdynamic, but it's not the dread peak like the DT990 600ohm I keep around for testing. It's a little bright, but the sound is the climb from mids to treble seems pretty aggressive. Songs with a lot of snare drums get annoying, I'd bet that where it peaks. The rest is detailed and sounds good, and higher treble isn't absent of air, but its not emphasized either. I think they played it fairly safe with the tuning.

Overall, it's better than the MMX300, DT700 Pro X, and 32 ohm DT770 but not as much fun as the DT900 Pro X. For closed back headphones I'd recommend them for a gamer who likes music and just wants one pair. For music fans, it's really if your library isn't focused on vocals and acoustic instruments. The drivers are fast and for EDM or rock it's very good. These are not going to fit every genre of music though. The Thieaudio Ghost is better for music, just not as good for gaming. I have a Sennheiser HD650 and it's still kingpin for acoustic and vocals along with the HD600.

They fit the same as other models, pads are the same traditional velour from the original DT770. The shells seem a little thinner plastic if you tap on them. They still feel solid with the same slider adjustment but it feels smoother and less clicky. The cable is the 9ft mini XLR, but a shorter one for travel would have been a good idea. These are compatible with the other 3 pin mini XLR cables.

The published specs:
impedance 48 ohms
weight headphones without cable 305 g
Headphone frequency response 5 - 40.000 Hz
STELLAR.45 driver
Sound pressure level @ 1 mW/500 Hz 98 dB
Sound pressure level @ 1 V/500 Hz 112 dB
T.H.D. @ 500 Hz < 0.05 %
Maximum short-term power handling capacity 210 mW
Ambient noise isolation 16 dBA
Length and type of cable 3 m / straight cable detachable, single-sided

I'm going to stick with my Hifiman HE5xx for a daily driver, but it was really nice to have a new favorite closed back pair to recommend to casual or serious gamers. For specific music that's not vocal or acoustic focused it would be fine. The DT177x would be better for most music though if closed back is the requirement. Noise isolation was as good at the DT770, which will block a central AC sound or a computer fan, but not much more like a landscaping crew rolling past. Overall, they're excellent for gaming, but for music they require equalizing, most won't be happy with them out of the box. They have good potential though if you don't mind tuning them with EQ.
 

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Nice review. My primary issue with the DT770/1770/700 Pro X, other than the overemphasized treble, is the dip present in the lower-mids, causing quite a hollow sound. Thankfully with literally just one EQ filter you can remedy that issue.

I'm assuming the DT770 Pro X is more similar than different to the DT770. If I understood correctly, the DT770 Pro X uses the driver from the 700 Pro X but are tuned to sound more like a DT770. I have a feeling these will become a permanent addition to the current lineup after the limited edition run.

Here's the filter for the regular DT770 (Adjust gain to taste and to account for unit variation):
PK 210 Hz Gain 4.0 dB Q 2.0
 
I just got these and at first were super harsh. I let them play with some bass heavy music for a little while and it seemed to change them quite a bit. Since that point the sound hasn't changed that I can tell. It seems they just needed a little exercise to give them a little mechanical break in. I bought these because I don't have anything that isn't open backed, and wanted something I could listen to at night without bothering my wife. Plus, I like that they are an anniversary addition and have the newer driver tech in them. For reference I have a pair of DT1990, DT880 600ohm, Beyer Tygr, HD6xx and HD58x. I also have a really old pair of HD600 that need some love. This is the first pair of closed back cans I have ever owned. My short term opinion with a day of listening on them, is I really like them. They are nice and punchy with good snap and dynamics. To me they have a very clean and transparent feel. The bass is tight and doesn't not bleed into the lower mids like it can on the Tygr. I can say there isn't any real lushness to the sound, it is very dry and clean, so if you are in love with your HD6xx, these are going to be a very different experience. Treble is a bit more forward, but seems to be better controlled than on the DT880 600ohm. Soundstage is better than I expected compared to how much everyone talks about closed back having no soundstage. To me they soundstage very good for a headphone with good separation and depth. If you value punch, dynamics and detail these do a great job. I can see where some might feel these are a little bit hot, but I am will to have that trade off for a nice snare drum thwack. Overall since I bought the DT1990 a few years back, I haven't really had the urge to listen to the HD6xx or HD58x. I bought the 880 600ohm more just to have them and got a deal on a brand new pair for $75 but don't use them much. Usually I use the Tygr when I want something light to wear and easy to listen to, but most of the time, I end up just going to get the DT1990 even though I don't find them as comfortable to were as the Tygr because the Tygr are just a little more bloated than I like. The DT1990 is a much better headphone than any of the others that I own, it makes it hard to want to listen to anything else. With the DT770 PRO X LE it gives me a lot of what I like about the 1990, in a closed back form factor, but still light and easy to wear without breaking the bank. If you like a dryer, cleaner sound with good clean bass extension and good sound staging in a closed back...these are great bang for the buck. I am actually looking forward to listening to them again tonight.
 
I wouldn't call them terrible, but they definitely take the DT770 a bit further into V-shape territory.
Anyway to slap a pair of Dekoni Elite Velour on in and see what it looks like. :cool: I have them for the DT1990, but I like the stock tuning better. When I get a chance I'm going to dig them out and give them a try. I also have a pair of Elite Hybrids that I might try also, but think they may be way to bass heavy. Thanks for all your research btw!
 
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Anyway to slap a pair of Dekoni Elite Velour on in and see what it looks like. :cool: I have them for the DT1990, but I like the stock tuning better. When I get a chance I'm going to dig them out and give them a try. I also have a pair of Elite Hybrids that I might try also, but think they may be way to bass heavy. Thanks for all your research btw!
While I do actually still have a pair of the DT770 Pro X here, I don't have any Dekoni Elite Velours earpads. Sorry!
 
A short listen with Dekoni Hybrid are the best fit of any of the Beyer's that I have tried them on yet. I might keep them on there since it's the first time they have actually made any of my headphones sound better so far
 
Anyway to slap a pair of Dekoni Elite Velour on in and see what it looks like. :cool: I have them for the DT1990, but I like the stock tuning better. When I get a chance I'm going to dig them out and give them a try. I also have a pair of Elite Hybrids that I might try also, but think they may be way to bass heavy. Thanks for all your research btw!

Happen to have the Dekoni pads and measured them on the DT 770 pro X. I've got the Elite Velour Beyer pads and the Elite Hybrid Hifiman pads. ;)

Check them out on my squiglink.
 

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Wow thanks! I haven't tried them with the velours yet but I'm guessing the HE Hybrids will have similar impact as the ones specifically for the Beyer's. It seems to match my listening impressions. At least I know I haven't gone completely deaf!
 
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Happen to have the Dekoni pads and measured them on the DT 770 pro X. I've got the Elite Velour Beyer pads and the Elite Hybrid Hifiman pads. ;)

Check them out on my squiglink.
A 10dB dip around 200Hz is nothing to write home about.
 
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A 10dB dip around 200Hz is nothing to write home about.
Yeah technically they could be better on paper but they do some things right that make me really like them as a daily driver. I mean...the HD 650 is down something like 10dB from 100Hz down. For $200 they have some great things going for them. When I want closer to ideal, I'm rocking the DT1990 anyway. These are closer to what I was hoping the Tygr was going to be like. While an easy headphone to listen to...the Tygr is just a lot more muted in sound with a much thicker and slower almost muddy mid bass, with no real sub bass authority even though it can trick you into thinking it's there. The 770X is a much more dynamic, punchy and detailed set than anything else in the Beyer line up beside the DT1990 from what I have heard.
 
I've always found the DT770 bass to be a little 'one note' and a bit 'dis-attached' (as if bass is too separated from the rest).
I blame this one note bass on the dip at 85Hz and the peak at 120Hz which the DT770 Pro X also has.
The dip at 200Hz is also part of this 'one-note bass' and responsible for the 'dis-attachment' to the rest of the music.
A small dip there (after elevated bass) is actually desirable as it prevents 'muddy' sound.
The way Sennheiser did this with the HD620S is near ideal (a small dip)
hd620s-connector-hole-sealed.png
 
I had a fun experiment: installed DT 700 Pro X drivers, pads and foams to DT 770 Pro X. This can be done without any mods, as both headphones share the same internal parts, as well as the pad rings even though they are not needed with DT 770 Pro style pads. Both models also seem to have pretty similar cup structure, as with same parts they sound almost identical considering the difference in clamping force.

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DT 700 Pro X pads alone are interesting as well, but with a hole between 2,5-4 kHz. By adding the thicker foam from DT 700 Pro X too, treble would line up with the harman target.
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I had a fun experiment: installed DT 700 Pro X drivers, pads and foams to DT 770 Pro X. This can be done without any mods, as both headphones share the same internal parts, as well as the pad rings even though they are not needed with DT 770 Pro style pads. Both models also seem to have pretty similar cup structure, as with same parts they sound almost identical considering the difference in clamping force.

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View attachment 372258

DT 700 Pro X pads alone are interesting as well, but with a hole between 2,5-4 kHz. By adding the thicker foam from DT 700 Pro X too, treble would line up with the harman target.
View attachment 372259
Interesting thanks for doing it. I would say not super surprised, but nice to confirm it
 
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