• WANTED: Happy members who like to discuss audio and other topics related to our interest. Desire to learn and share knowledge of science required as is 20 years of participation in forums (not all true). Come here to have fun, be ready to be teased and not take online life too seriously. We now measure and review equipment for free! Click here for details.

AXPONA 2017: DEG and High-resolution audio

amirm

Founder/Admin
Staff Member
CFO (Chief Fun Officer)
Joined
Feb 13, 2016
Messages
22,082
Likes
32,230
Location
Seattle Area
#1
DEG which is a trade group is pushing for better efforts around high-resolution audio. Here is the list of companies poised to stream high resolution audio:

093A8767.jpg


I had a long chat with Marc Finer above. I explained how disappointing it is to find high-res files that have problems, are still compressed like the CD is, etc. He fully understood the issues and promised that this go around the recording engineers are involved. And that labels are standardizing the work-orders to include high-resolution files as a deliverable in addition to MP3, CD, etc. And that they will be providing proper provenance and metadata (album information). I offered to help in any way I can (my group and I worked with DEG while I was at Microsoft on introduction of high definition optical media).

Let's hope all of this comes to fruition.
 

Cosmik

Major Contributor
Joined
Apr 24, 2016
Messages
3,075
Likes
1,929
Location
UK
#2
I explained how disappointing it is to find high-res files that have problems, are still compressed like the CD is, etc.
I hope you're not advocating that badly mastered is OK for CD, but that we have a special, expensive audiophile master for the high res..? This would be a very cynical ploy IMO. A far nicer strategy would be for consumer players for the car etc. to have a 'dynamic range limiter' button that applies compression as a selectable option.

CD is just as capable of reproducing an 'audiophile master' as high res. Science tells us that the only difference is a truly minuscule amount of noise if you turn the volume right up - no listening tests required..!:)
 

amirm

Founder/Admin
Staff Member
CFO (Chief Fun Officer)
Joined
Feb 13, 2016
Messages
22,082
Likes
32,230
Location
Seattle Area
#3
I hope you're not advocating that badly mastered is OK for CD, but that we have a special, expensive audiophile master for the high res..?
I am not advocating that but it is a reality that will not change. CD is targeted at mass market and no audiophile is going to tell the labels otherwise. Our only hope is that when the provide lossless download/streams or high resolution, they give us pre-CD-mastering version.
 

Jinjuku

Addicted to Fun and Learning
Patreon Donor
Joined
Feb 28, 2016
Messages
640
Likes
268
#4
Why don't labels include a meta tag for Dynamic Range?
 

Jinjuku

Addicted to Fun and Learning
Patreon Donor
Joined
Feb 28, 2016
Messages
640
Likes
268
#6
Because they are clueless and don't want to know about anal audiophiles.. they just pump out music , stack it high sell it low.
If they are pimping the 'Hi-Res' label it would help. It's like factories that tout they are ISO certified. The consumer doesn't realize that all that means is they could be turning out junk but the process is consistent.
 

Fitzcaraldo215

Major Contributor
Joined
Mar 4, 2016
Messages
1,427
Likes
537
#7
I feel your pain, guys. Fortunately for me, I am a classical music fan, and none of the above problems are remotely a factor in what I buy and listen to. My interest actually is > 95% in hi rez, natively recorded and played back as such, and for me in multichannel, of course. Classical and pop music recording appear to live on different planets, or even in different galaxies.

It appears we do not all have the same battles to fight in order to get good sounding music.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom