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Audiophile jewelry - most beautiful Cd players, turntables and other gear

SimpleTheater

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If anyone is ever interested in the ML1, please be aware that, according to the Positive Feedback review, you will need to add $1,899 for WyWire Silver phono cables to really make it a great TT. "Goodbye provided cables, and hello WyWire Silver phono cables! That doubled the definition right there!"

For those of you who have never heard a cable "doubling the definition", well you're not an audiophile.

And they're a bit of audiophile jewelry to boot.
1617746529479.png
 

LTig

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If anyone is ever interested in the ML1, please be aware that, according to the Positive Feedback review, you will need to add $1,899 for WyWire Silver phono cables to really make it a great TT. "Goodbye provided cables, and hello WyWire Silver phono cables! That doubled the definition right there!"

For those of you who have never heard a cable "doubling the definition", well you're not an audiophile.

And they're a bit of audiophile jewelry to boot.
View attachment 122483
Looks rather like a typical mains cable of a hot iron...
 

Wes

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Yeah, this is audio jewelry at its best. Whoever designed this thing has absolutely no clue how a turntable works. Arm bearing and platter bearing need a 100% rigid connection, otherwise the tiniest movement of the platter translates into movements of the pickup and hence into a signal which is not related to the music.:facepalm:
They just need to levitate the arm as a unit with the platter.
 

Frank Dernie

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Yeah, this is audio jewelry at its best. Whoever designed this thing has absolutely no clue how a turntable works. Arm bearing and platter bearing need a 100% rigid connection, otherwise the tiniest movement of the platter translates into movements of the pickup and hence into a signal which is not related to the music.:facepalm:
Sort of true but none of the likely movement will be high enough in frequency to be picked up and output by a seismic transducer, which is what a pickup cartridge is.

At v low frequency the cartridge body moves along with the stylus, which is just as well otherwise the system wouldn't be able to track the record.
As frequency rises the cartridge body starts moving more than the stylus, so there could be output but it is spurious.
At resonance the cartridge body is potentially moving much more than the stylus so if excited by warps etc there can be a very big electrical signal but it is generated by the cartridge body oscillation, not groove modulation.
At resonance is the phase shift followed by the cartridge body starting to move less and less until around 2x the resonant frequency (depending on cantilever damping) the cartridge body becomes effectively stationary and its output entirely generated by stylus movement. From this frequency up the cartridge output will be a (fairly) accurate transduction of the groove.

The main requirement of the arm/platter "stiffness" is to maintain alignment not to make the output accurate, that is achieved by the basic physics of the way the transducer works.
In fact the more rigid the arm the higher frequency it couples plinth vibration to the cartridge body - which we do not want to vibrate since it is the "stator" of the transducer.

It still isn't simple because any vibration mode which doesn't have a node at the cartridge body will give output which isn't on the record but none of a record deck is "rigid" over the whole audio band - nowhere near in fact.

"Rigid" has been used in the marketing of record playing kit for so long it has stuck, but it is not as important as published, and I am sure there are plenty of well engineered record players that get a good balance of distributed stiffness and mass but plenty wrongly asserting the importance of stiffness alone, particularly at the "fashion" end of the business.

Having written all that this one won't be stiff enough to maintain basic cartridge geometry so is indeed, shite.
 
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Frank Dernie

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When I did my DAC comparison about 10 years ago this was one of the ones I borrowed, mainly because I loved the styling but the build quality looked good too.
Despite it not sounding enough different to the others to reliably tell which was which I did buy it because I liked the styling it so much.
It was doubly stupid because not much later I bought a Devialet amp and it became redundant, it now is in my bedroom with other favourite kit I can't bear to sell.
 

LTig

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Sort of true but none of the likely movement will be high enough in frequency to be picked up and output by a seismic transducer, which is what a pickup cartridge is.

At v low frequency the cartridge body moves along with the stylus, which is just as well otherwise the system wouldn't be able to track the record.
As frequency rises the cartridge body starts moving more than the stylus, so there could be output but it is spurious.
At resonance the cartridge body is potentially moving much more than the stylus so if excited by warps etc there can be a very big electrical signal but it is generated by the cartridge body oscillation, not stylus movement.
At resonance is the phase shift followed by the cartridge body starting to move less and less until around 2x the resonant frequency (depending on cantilever damping) the cartridge body becomes effectively stationary and its output entirely generated by stylus movement. From this frequency up the cartridge output will be a (fairly) accurate transduction of the groove.

The main requirement of the arm/platter "stiffness" is to maintain alignment not to make the output accurate, that is achieved by the basic physics of the way the transducer works.
In fact the more rigid the arm the higher frequency it couples plinth vibration to the cartridge body - which we do not want to vibrate since it is the "stator" of the transducer.

It still isn't simple because any vibration mode which doesn't have a node at the cartridge body will give output which isn't on the record but none of a record deck is "rigid" over the whole audio band - nowhere near in fact.

"Rigid" has been used in the marketing of record playing kit for so long it has stuck, but it is not as important as published, and I am sure there are plenty of well engineered record players that get a good balance of distributed stiffness and mass but plenty wrongly asserting the importance of stiffness alone, particularly at the "fashion" end of the business.

Having written all that this one won't be stiff enough to maintain basic cartridge geometry so is indeed, shite.
Thanks a lot. So I assume a TT with a magnetic bearing which can only move in the vertical axis would be OK?
 

Frank Dernie

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Thanks a lot. So I assume a TT with a magnetic bearing which can only move in the vertical axis would be OK?
It depends on the detail, as ever with dynamic systems. The platter will have a mass and the magnetic restoration force will vary with axial travel so there will be dynamic coupling, just like a spring/mass system. How effective it is, and over what frequencies will depend on design detail.
Also FWIW of all 6 degrees of freedom which can couple to the platter the one(s) that are most important to isolate are any generating horizontal movement at the LP surface normal to the cartridge body (the sum channel for the cartridge) which is a combination of horizontal and rocking isolation. Vertical isolation is of secondary (real) importance, although, yet again, this has been the only part talked about by fans for decades.
 

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