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Audibility of speaker stands, feet, isolation pads etc.?

birdog1960

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Here's an interesting result on a similar topic: https://www.audiosciencereview.com/...bx-audibly-improved-by-5-silicone-pads.32640/

The "Similar threads" feature of the forum is great!
yes, but doesn't address the difference between putting spikes on speaker stands vs directly on speakers. an article I linked (awaiting moderation) includes the statement that spikes on stands actually couple rather than decouple and should only be used on carpeted floors in that scenario.
 

Bob from Florida

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what about the interface between the speaker and the stand? I've seen blue tac recommended . As of now, I'm thinking stand with no spikes on hardwood floor, 1/2 sand filled stands (lower center of gravity for stability) and blue tac to partially stabilize speakers on stand. obviously will be experimenting with setup tho. thoughts? seems a very confusing topic.
Blu Tac will help to prevent your speakers from falling off the stands. Some companies actually have speakers that bolt to the stands - ideal when you think about it. I think heavy, stable stands are best. Sound Anchor stands are fantastic meeting those requirements.
 
D

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Unless you hear something obviously wrong,you are wasting time chasing something that doesn't exist and not listening to music...
 
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Alexium

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Unless you hear something obviously wrong,you are wasting time chasing something that doesn't exist and not listening to music...
I totally agree with you, these things can consume a lot of time you won't ever get back. And I know I'm bad at hearing these minute changes without being able to A/B side by side (one good solution to this is record your system with a good mic and then compare two recordings). But on the other hand, if there is a small, but free improvement to be had from simple things like silicone feet - I'll take it!
 

birdog1960

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Blu Tac will help to prevent your speakers from falling off the stands. Some companies actually have speakers that bolt to the stands - ideal when you think about it. I think heavy, stable stands are best. Sound Anchor stands are fantastic meeting those requirements.
thanks, biggest concern are twin Australian Shepherds! Want solid as possible without hurting sound.
 

Bob from Florida

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I would say that they are as good as sticky when it comes to shearing / sliding motion.
Blu Tac will hold in both directions - up as well as side to side. So, how much force is required to break the speaker free and tip off the stand? That is the question I ask.
 

Emulator II

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I can't see what's wrong with filling a speaker stand with sand, for example. The weight is increased, the center of gravity of the entire system is thus shifted further down, which in turn increases stability. Resonances of whatever kind in the now filled hollow bodies are effectively reduced, which a simple test with the knuckle clearly shows.

The only thing that would speak against it, in my opinion, is if the loudspeaker designer had planned the resonances that inevitably arise in these hollow bodies in his overall loudspeaker concept.
In this context, perhaps Q Acoustics should be mentioned, who have been offering different stand concepts for their loudspeakers for quite a while and who do see them (sometimes) as a part of the loudspeaker.

Blu Tac will hold in both directions - up as well as side to side. So, how much force is required to break the speaker free and tip off the stand? That is the question I ask.
I just did the test. My 18kg speakers are fixed on the sand filled stands (I have no idea what they weigh now) via Blu Tac. If I press against the speakers from the side, I lift the stand as well. So that seems to be a relatively solid connection.
 

birdog1960

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Just filled my stands with 7 pounds of kitty litter -easier to handle than sand and $1.50 at Walmart. Seem more stable. Can't wait to see and hear the BMR Philharmonics arriving tomorrow. Will be using Blu Tac.
 

chips666

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Just filled my stands with 7 pounds of kitty litter -easier to handle than sand and $1.50 at Walmart. Seem more stable. Can't wait to see and hear the BMR Philharmonics arriving tomorrow. Will be using Blu Tac.
Good alternative for blu tack...

422x840.jpg
 
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ryanosaur

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The only real purpose of filling stands with sand or kitty litter is to lower the center of gravity. Which is great for stability. I personally do not buy into the idea that a Speaker can generate so much energy as to make a steel pipe ring at a frequency you can hear. The thing about filling a stand is that you want to make certain you aren't putting anything in it that can corrode or rust the metal. Kiln Dried Sand is often recommended for this as it has the least water content short of getting Lead or Brass Shot. Kitty litter is Clay which will contain moisture. Salt is corrosive. Speaker Stands should only be filled about 2/3 full to avoid raising the center of gravity too high.

Now... because it was brought up:
Spikes couple to the floor and are meant to punch through carpet and set firmly into the floor board. This is where you get stability from.
To properly level such a stand, you need to get it sitting solid, then incrementally level it by adjusting all of the feet. I have such a VTI stand and it was kind of a PITA. They are pretty stable now, but any 3' stand with a 32# Speaker on top of it is going to have some play.
Regarding the top plate. Museum Putty is a good solution. I use a monitor isolation pad between my speaker and the stand, but I also needed the 2" the pad added to the height.
Everybody freaks out about the dimensions of the top plate. It's not worth the energy. Get the stand level and sitting firm on the floor, get the speaker protected so it does not get scratched, make certain it is sturdy enough to resist a drunken attempt to hug the Speaker... that's about all you can do. My wife bumped one of my speakers and it slid on the pad a bit. But stayed upright.
Now if the old San Andreas decides to give out, I don't think my BMRs will stand a chance up there on those VTIs, or any other stand.
 

DJNX

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But in a typical living room, typical speakers, typical listening volume, can it actually make an audible difference?
The thing is that if the speaker is coupling with the floor generating resonances, can you really say there is a typical floor?
So at the end a resonant floor is part of the room acoustics, and we all can agree that it's impossible to talk about a "typical room" acoustically, so your floor might be:
-not resonant
-resonant, but not enough to affect sound
-resonant, producing audible distortion
-very resonant, making your entire floor sing

The issue is that the entire decoupling thing has been hijacked as yet another audiophile tweak, with the belief that you have to decouple everything, and that it always leads to improvement.
 
D

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I totally agree with you, these things can consume a lot of time you won't ever get back. And I know I'm bad at hearing these minute changes without being able to A/B side by side (one good solution to this is record your system with a good mic and then compare two recordings). But on the other hand, if there is a small, but free improvement to be had from simple things like silicone feet - I'll take it!
Have fun and good luck!
 

izeek

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all forms of decoupling will result in some level of success.
i live on the third floor of an apartment building. the floor is wood.
the vibration from my jbl l890s, and the two matching subs, was quite noticeable as a boomy thud with resonances.
i tried rubber/cork pads from supplyhouse that did help. i also tried rubber/sorbothane pads but felt like they muddied up the mid-lows. 2-3/10
i then tried setting the towers on hardwood boards. tightened up to bass a tad. 2/10.
boards with horsestall mat underneath them. more detail, less thud, less boom. 3/10.
horsestall mat under a paver with no feet is the best result so far. 5-6/10. real nice detail with little to no ringing, a touch more lower mid emphasis, smooth highs till you get too loud.
the subs are now on isoacoustics iso2000 sub stands on a paver. that was also a 4-5/10 in noticeability.
maybe the neighbors on the two connecting walls hear some bleed through if im loud but you cannot hear it in the hall unless im around 70dbs.
im always amazed at how loud it can be when i open the door since i dont hear till then.
all that to say that many things will work to reduce vibration. just gotta find what works for you.
ask gaia users how they feel.
 

izeek

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what about the interface between the speaker and the stand? I've seen blue tac recommended . As of now, I'm thinking stand with no spikes on hardwood floor, 1/2 sand filled stands (lower center of gravity for stability) and blue tac to partially stabilize speakers on stand. obviously will be experimenting with setup tho. thoughts? seems a very confusing topic.
really just try it. not expensive.
pretty sure youll notice something, plus or minus.
 

Thomas_A

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See also


And linked threads.
 

dorakeg

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The only real purpose of filling stands with sand or kitty litter is to lower the center of gravity. Which is great for stability. I personally do not buy into the idea that a Speaker can generate so much energy as to make a steel pipe ring at a frequency you can hear.

Sand also acts as a damper which dampens the vibration of the steel stand.

Most stands are made of jist steel. Being made of a single material, it will have its own resonance frequency (could be more than 1).
 
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