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10 Tips on Shooting in Dark Light Conditions

inspiring

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Most of the reason people buy DSLR cameras because they want the quality of the picture increases especially in dark light conditions. DSLR cameras have much larger image sensors than compact cameras so the potential for getting a great photo is definitely bigger.

But if you can not menyetting and use it well, then the images with DSLR cameras will not be maximized as well. In this article I will share some tips when shooting in dark enough light conditions, for example indoors or at night.

1. Use high ISO - When shooting in dark light conditions and with camera in hand, we recommend using high ISO about ISO 800-6400 (depending on light level).

High ISO will make the photo quality becomes less good, But if the light conditions are very dark and we do not have tools like a tripod or flash, then the only way to keep the photo is not dark / sharp is to use high ISO.


2. Aperture Priority Mode (A or Av) - The camera mode I rely on is A / Av mode. This mode is quite reliable for various conditions, including dark light conditions.

If you are experienced enough, Manual mode (M) is also pretty good. Mode A is quite practical. When shooting in dark light conditions, rotate the opening value to a small number such as f / 3.5 or even smaller.

The smaller the number, the larger the lens aperture. The value of this opening depends on the lens attached. There is a lens that can open up to f / 1.4 but most zoom lenses are maximally open at about f / 3.5, f / 4 or f / 5.6.

Aperture is a window in the room. The bigger the window, the brighter the room. When the light conditions are dark, large openings are required.


3. Wear large open lens - Connecting from the above tips, large aperture lens is advantageous in dark light conditions. With large open lens, such as 35mm f / 1.8 or 50mm f / 1.8, we can put a lot of light into the camera.

When using a very large opening, ISO does not need to be too high, ISO 400-1600 is usually enough. Another effect of large apertures that are unfocused backgrounds will be blurry, while the focusing subject will be sharp. Ideal for portrait people / models.

4. Continuous drive - Taking pictures in a row can help in dark light conditions. The goal is to get one sharp photo. How to enable consecutive photos is in the drive mode menu.

Choose layered plaid symbols, then when taking photos. Hold down the shutter / shutter button and the camera will take the photo in a row. Choose the best photos from some of the photos you have created.

5. Notice the direction of light that falls onto the subject of the photograph - Observe the fall of light to the subject. For example when photographing people, observe whether the light that falls into the face quite evenly? Or his face is covered with shadows?

If possible, communicate to the subject to turn towards the light.

6. Wait for the right moment - If the subject can not be set, then wait for the right moment to shoot. When a fashion show for example, there is a time 1-2 seconds when the subject pose and silence. It was a good time to take pictures.

7. Hold grip - When shooting in very dark light conditions, usually the shutter speed becomes quite slow. At that time, we must consolidate camera grip and good breathing exercises.

Hold your breath and exhale slowly while pressing the shutter button gently. Set your body position and do not let the camera vibrate when you press the shutter button.

8. Movement Effect - We can create a moving person effect by inserting motion blur elements. The trick is to use a slow shutter speed and then a little panning (moving the camera) so that the subject of the photo and background a little blur. The effects of this movement sometimes succeed, sometimes failing because it is too blur / shake.

9. Use a tripod - Tripod is ideal for shooting a subject that is not moving at night, Such as photos of natural scenery, city, sky or indoors. By using a tripod, we do not worry slow shutter speed causes a photo blur.

We can also use the smallest ISO (100/200) to get the image with the maximum quality. Tripods will not help when photographing moving subjects such as human or animal photos.

10. Use flash / flash - If the light that illuminates the subject is not good (dark, evenly, the color does not match). So the solution is to use flash. In DSLR cameras there is usually a built-in flash (Built-in flash).

This flash can help illuminate the subject, but usually the result is hard and eliminates the subject dimension. I suggest using an external flash (speedlight). If shooting indoors, Point the flash to the ceiling so that the light will be reflected back to the subject.

The result is a softer and more even light, the subject dimension also looks more real and natural. Make sure the ceiling is not too high or has a color that does not match, because the reflected light will have a color according to the color of the ceiling.


(In a very dark light condition because the sun is not yet rising and the temple lighting is very dim, I wait until the nun looks at the light coming from the light outside the temple room ISO 3200, f / 1.4, 1/100 sec)
 

Frank Dernie

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#2
Tripod and Noctilux for me!
I detest the look of pictures taken with on-camera flash and getting falsh right takes a lot of kit, skill and space IME :)
 

Frank Dernie

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The Noctilux pricing is not for feint of heart.
I bought mine 25 years ago used, when prices were slightly more sane. Had its rangefinder re-set for digital sensor (the film setting allowed for a small amount of film buckle in the guides) and coded for the M digitals a few years ago, mind you I don't use it much, a bit heavy, I used it indoors a lot when on holiday in Italy and Hungary.
The new f0.95 is even dearer and much bigger and heavier and whilst sharper the boke is not as smooth, and since most of the image is boke at f1 it needs to be nice IMO.
 

Frank Dernie

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High quality lenses are exceptionally expensive to make (unlike high quality electronics where the most expensive bit tends to be the case).
One of the high refractive index glasses in the f1 Nocti takes 4 weeks to anneal, elements need to be positioned to microns and their position compensated for temperature changes.
If you want to see -really- expensive lenses the high quality lenses made for video take some beating :)
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/lenses/phd/4291107378/ci/25248/N/3908282147
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Lenses/ci/1884/N/3908282152
 

RayDunzl

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Blumlein 88

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I bought mine 25 years ago used, when prices were slightly more sane. Had its rangefinder re-set for digital sensor (the film setting allowed for a small amount of film buckle in the guides) and coded for the M digitals a few years ago, mind you I don't use it much, a bit heavy, I used it indoors a lot when on holiday in Italy and Hungary.
The new f0.95 is even dearer and much bigger and heavier and whilst sharper the boke is not as smooth, and since most of the image is boke at f1 it needs to be nice IMO.
Yes, I was surprised to see such an expensive lens with such an unattractive bokeh. In some shots I looked up it nearly undid the niceness of the lens in an aesthetic sense.
 
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