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  1. Thomas_A

    THD has a much bigger effect on sound than you think

    One could also use the human whistle.
  2. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    BTW, I made a simple recording of pink noise: a mono center speaker vs stereo speakers, only "left ear" below in mono. https://www.dropbox.com/s/atkjsqe4oujdx5e/mono%20vs%20stereo.wav?dl=0 Far from ideal experiment, but can you hear the timbral shift?
  3. Thomas_A

    What headphones would you like Amir to measure next?

    Time for the Chinese-branded AKG K271 Mk2? I would like to see the direct comparison with the Austrian model to see if and what has changed. (And the DT-150/DT100 pad...)
  4. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    I tried with my simple setup at home (again) using OM1/Omni1 microphones taped to my ears. At LP where the steady-state curve is sloping a la Harman. Microphones are not calibrated to diffuse field which may cause loss in the HF region. The first file is the raw file and must be listened to...
  5. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    It will be It will be a judgement of what is "linear" or not. One could call my speakers linear on-axis with +/- 2.5 dB, but could also be called "stereo compensated". My years of listening and DIY have at least made me satisfied.
  6. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    It will be a hard test binaurally but certainly possible. I have suggested previously to test the same speakers with different EQ. Both within +/- 1.5 dB. One where there is a peaking at 3-4 kHz and 7-8 kHz, and one with the opposite EQ, i.e. dips at 3-4 khz and 7-8 kHz. I could perhaps do...
  7. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    Yes reflections do mitigate the stereo problem. This is also why any corrections would be within the spec of most speakers. And as I mentioned, no such tests have been done. We assume that a perfectly linear response from a mono speaker also is the best speaker in stereo. But this assumption...
  8. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    And I am quite confident that a QM60 or pI60s will come up as a top speaker also in a binaural contest. As you know 2 kHz dip which is had at +/-23° stereo setup cannot be compensated. You can only compensate partly by not exaggerating the response 3-4 kHz and 7-8 kHz. Not one speaker is equal...
  9. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    It is old knowlegde, also in Tooles book. Stereo dilemma.
  10. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    I am referring to the Revels here. The experiment that needs to be done is to have three speakers with as good response as possible placed in center and stereo setup, say +/- 0.5 dB on axis and likewise smooth off axis Play pink noise alternating the center and stereo. Adjust the stereo...
  11. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    One could argue so. However very much of music content lies in the center of the phantom image, such as voices. There is just no optimal solution other than to add a center channel if you want correct timbre across the whole image. For stereo playback, there are only compromises which questions...
  12. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    If you put a speaker with a linear response +/-1.5 dB against speakers with +/- 5 dB it will be quite certain which will win. With respect to stereo system corrections you need to test speakers that are within +/- 1.5 dB. Such a test has not been performed in the Scientific literature. Yet.
  13. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    But he admits that the 2 channel speakers sounds different from the ideal speaker in mono. He also says that don't use 2-channel, because it is flawed. If you are using 2-channel, the timbre will be different from the same speaker in mono. So the ideal speaker in mono is not the ideal speaker in...
  14. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    The F52 has a dip around 3 khz and several smaller Revels are voiced with slight dips 3-4 khz and even 7-8 kHz and are highly praised: https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?threads/revel-m105-bookshelf-speaker-review.14745/#post-458254...
  15. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    I would say it depends on many things. The main things IMO are how the speakers dealt with the stereo system errors and also how the recording was made, taking into account the ratio of direct to reflected sound. I preferred B for piano because in my mind of the more natural timbre.
  16. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    Headphones needs to be used. Neutral ones.
  17. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    When I read about their new methods, they seem to capture the impulse response which is then processed on any music of choice. Is that correct? So does that solve the room issues?
  18. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    So this is what I don't understand. Is the listening position judged to be in nearfield relative to the room size? What is the direct/reflective ratio here? If the direct sound is dominating here, I can understand better.
  19. Thomas_A

    Binaural blind comparison test of 4 loudspeakers - II

    In that case, you would need a headphone that has a target curve according to the green line in the Olive link. Otherwise I don't understand how you can get the correct impression of the tonality of the recordings. A "Harman target" headphone will sound dark and bass-heavy. The files however...
  20. Thomas_A

    The IKEA Eneby 12 inch measurements

    It is more likely that Teenage Engineering has something to do with IKEA Eneby. And perhaps some secret "loudspeaker guru" from Sweden. https://teenage.engineering/products/ob-4
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